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Week 32

 

  1. The term “kiln atmosphere” is used to define the character of the heat distribution and the amount of _________________ inside the firing chamber during the course of a firing.

    1. sulfides

    2. carbon

    3. oxygen

    4. nitrogen

  2. Stained surface are __________________ . What you see before firing looks very much like the final product. This is important to those who don't like the transformation that glazes undergo during firing.

    1. Glossy in surface

    2. Hide clay/making imperfections

    3. WYSIWYG

    4. excellent sealants for functional ware

  3. ________________is crucial to the look of the glaze. Crystals seem to form at temperatures between 1800-1500F in a kiln that is ________________properly.

    1. Cooling

    2. Heating

    3. Water smoking

    4. Candling

  4. When firing opalescent glazes, a ________________firing recommended to achieve the opalescent character. It is recommended that opalescent glazes be applied in multiple coatings over a dark clay body.

    1. slow

    2. fast

    3. reduction

    4. incremental

 

This weeks questions come from Electric Kiln Ceramics A Guide to Clays and Glazes, by Richard Zakin, c.2004 Third Edition, krause Publications.

 

Note from Pres:The first edition of this book(which I have) was one of a tide of firsts entering into electric kiln ceramics and mid-fire clay bodies and glazes. Much of the information is available elsewhere, but Richard Zakin was much a pioneer here with his first edition. The 3rd edition is even better.

 

 

Answers:

  1. 3. oxygen-The term “kiln atmosphere” is used to define the character of the heat distribution and the amount of oxygen inside the firing chamber during the course of a firing. The kiln atmosphere has a very strong influence on the look of the Work. The design of the electric kiln encourages very consistent heat conditions throughout the firing chamber and allows an ample flow of oxygen into the chamber at all times.

  2. 3. WYSIWYG-Stained surfaces have a number of significant advantages:

    • They are very simple to use.

    • These surfaces are WYSIWYG (What you see is What you get). What you see before firing looks very much like the final product. This is important to those who don’t like the transformation glazes undergo during firing.

    • They Work well alone or in combination with slips and glazes.

    • The color is excellent when fired in the electric kiln.

    • Because they don’t cover or obscure the clay body, relief and engraved or impressed imagery is shown to good advantage.

    • They are more consistent and reliable than most ceramic surfaces.

  1. 1. Cooling- Extend the cooling cycle of your firings. Cooling is crucial to the look of the glaze. Crystals seem to form most at temperatures between 1800F. To 1500F. In a kiln that is cooling slowly. Even at lower temperatures, however, color and texture respond to slow cooling.

  2. 2. Fast-Opalescent glazes have a high gloss and a strong metallic and opalescent character. A fast firing is recommended to encourage the opalescent effect. It is recommended that opalescent glazes be applied in multiple coatings over a dark clay body. They flow a good deal and their color can vary due to this glaze flow, from thin in such areas as the edges of the form, to thick where they have had a chance to pool. These color changes have appeal because they create an interesting play of light and dark.

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I'm going with 3-3-1-1, tho I 'm not sure about developing opalescence--I wonder if there is a difference between electric firing and other methods. 

 

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Yeah for all of us nerds from the early days of computers when printouts would look so much different from screen documents WYSIWYG was a great step forward in that what you saw on screen was what you got printed out. Usually used in reference to word processors, it also came to spreadsheets and all sorts of other documents.

 

best,

Pres

Marcia Selsor likes this

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my first computer was a Commadore 64. Then an Apple 512. I taught computer graphics by having to use commands to draw a line in the late 70s.

Not sure I ever saw wysiwyg used. I though maybe Glaze Nerd had a new phrase.

Marcia

 

Pres likes this

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