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Week 31

  1. _______________ is a highly plastic clay originating in the decomposition of volcanic ash. It is extremely fine and can be dispersed widely throughout bodies and glazes, in which it is used to impart plasticity and an ability to keep a glaze slop in suspension.

    1. Bauxite

    2. Colemanite

    3. Bentonite

    4. Ball clay

  2. One of the primary phases of silica, cristobalite, is important to the ceramist. The others are quartz, tridymite, and silica glass. _________________bodies have a anti-craze properties due to its unique expansion rate.

    1. Bauxite

    2. Cristobalite

    3. Colemanite

    4. Anorthite

  3. A ________________ is an 18th -century French cheesecake. Also the small mould in which it was baked. In modern potter's usage, a _______________ is any small deep bowl often with a single side handle and a lid, used for baking and serving individual portions.

    1. albarello

    2. aquamanile

    3. pipkin

    4. ramekin

  4. The ___________________ was a popular tavern joke of the 17th to 19th centuries in Europe. The handle was hollow and the ale was drunk by sucking it up through one of several spouts. To make the suction work, all of the others holes, obvious and secret, had to be covered.

    1. frog mug

    2. puzzle jug

    3. tavern tankard

    4. ale tester

 

This weeks questions come from The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques, by Frank Hamer, c.1975 First Edition, Watson-Guptill Publications.

 

Note from Pres: It had to happen for those of you who know your books. Of all of the ones in my collection, I probably value this above all the rest as a reference for all things ceramic. Mine has the original paper jacket, even though tattered, and is in excellent condition even though I have often used it reading portions and the entire book more than once. If you don't have it, get it.

 

 

Answers:

  1. 3. bentonite-A highly plastic clay originating in the de- composition of volcanic ash. It is extremely fine and can be dispersed widely through bodies and glazes, in which it is used to impart plasticity and an ability to keep a glaze slop in suspension. Up to 2% can be safely added to all bodies and will improve plasticity. Up to 1% can be safely added to glazes and the slop water made slightly acidic by a few drops of calcium chloride solution.

  2. 2. Cristobalite-Silica. SiO2. One of the primary phases of silica which are important to the ceramist. The others are quartz, tridymite and silica glass. See Silica phases. These four phases are chemically identical but are physically different in their molecular structures. They there fore exhibit different physical properties. It is for its unique expansion rate that cristobalite is used in ceramics. Cristobalite bodies have anti-craze properties.

  3. 4. ramekin-Ramequin. An 18th-century French cheesecake. Also the small mould in which it was baked. Hence in modern potter’s usage, a ramekin is any small deep bowl, often with a single side-handle, and often with a lid, used for both baking and serving individual portions.

  4. 2. puzzle jug-A popular tavern joke jug of the 17th to 19th centuries in Europe. The handle was hollow and the ale was drunk by sucking it up through one of the spouts. To make the suction Work, all the other holes, both obvious and secret, had to be covered.

 

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15 hours ago, Pres said:
  1. A ________________ is an 18th -century French cheesecake.

 

I think a cheese tartlet would be more accurate; also fondue variants, depending on where in France you are. Cheesecake is an entirely different thing!

Edited by Sputty
More extremely interesting information, without which your life would be incomplete.

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5 hours ago, Sputty said:

I think a cheese tartlet would be more accurate; also fondue variants, depending on where in France you are. Cheesecake is an entirely different thing!

Well Sputty, don't shoot the messenger, I quoted directly from text, and I am sure that the interest here was more in the mould than the tartlet/chessecake or other such delicacies.

best,

Pres

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30 minutes ago, Pres said:

Well Sputty, don't shoot the messenger

Of course not.

But words are interesting, are they not, and their definitions and derivations? I certainly learned something, with respect to fondue possibilities, at least. And most potters are cooks, I find.

Lots of pots have names which hint at their history. Salt Pig, for example, where 'pig' refers to 'earthenware vessel' in a Scots dialect.

I love the history of pots, including their names, and I don't think anyone - me included - needs shooting, TBH. I am but another messenger.

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Yes, speaking of words and derivations. . . think about the word mould used in the text that ID's the text as coming from Europe not the USA, as we would spell it mold. This day and age, to preserve the original text, I have to put the word into my spell checker, as I do believe original text should be preseved.

best,

Pres

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