Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

Recommended Posts

Hi folks, I have been thinking a lot of late of the types of things that would be good experiences for beginning throwers, withing to improve their throwing skills. so a few listings of ideas in this thread would be helpful for anyone wishing to develop greater throwing skills and control on the wheel.

Basic

  1. 9" cylinder with 3# of clay. This should have a flat bottom, evenly compressed, side walls tapering slightly in thickness to the rim that should be slightly thicker than the side walls at the top. Cut several vertically in half to gauge your progress using a cutting wire from the base to the top.
  2. 8" diameter bowl with 3# of clay. Remember that a true bowl has a rounded interior, so when opening up develop a rounded bottom instead of a flat bottom as in the cylinder. Again cut several of these in half to check progress. Always remember that a bowl will need extra thickness at the base to support the outer walls from collapsing. 
  3.  10" plate with 3# of clay. Begin using softer clay, and make careful compression across the area of the plate, as the biggest problem with plates is the lack of compression causing "s"  shaped cracks.

Basic + Hump

  1. Vessel- small cup off of tennis ball size piece of clay.  Throw several off of a 4-6# Ball of clay, center the  entire ball as much as possible into a cone, then center the top portion of the cone into a tennis ball size, well centered. Throw a cylinder shape, use a rib  to define the base, and cut from wheel with a cutting wire, and remove to a bat. Repeat until all of the ball is used up.
  2. Bowl-throw several bowls using a baseball sized ball of clay off of a 4-6# hump of clay.  Try to make the form a bowl shape, cut and remove as in the vessel, and check progress.
  3. Apple baker-Start this form with a baseball sized piece of clay. Open the form as in a bowl, slightly away from center leaving a center stem area. Open the center stem area and pull upwards into  narrow cone, close the cone with your fingers, necking inward. Then finish shaping the outer bowl area. cut and remove from the wheel. Check progress with these also to assess the two pulled shapes in the single form.

 

 

 

These are just thoughts and I wouldn't have had the apple baker in this list until lately. However, I do believe that the simplicity and complexity of the form will help to improve throwing skills of anyone wishing to advance their skill level.

Please feel free to add projects that you believe that will advance throwing skills for a beginner, intermediate, or advanced thower.

 

best,

Pres

Edited by Pres
Rae Reich caught a directional error-corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like this idea.  I've had some trouble throwing and getting the shapes I wanted, so I've gone back to to basics too.

It might be useful if you upload sketches showing what kind of shapes you want.  That way people can cut their pots in half and see how they compare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll throw the shapes and take pictures just to see where I am at in this. I think my cylinders are still not the best. I have a hard time getting the very bottom of the walls even. I will try this next time I am in the studio.

Interesting stuff pres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Pres said:

Have you ever thrown an apple baker?

I have no idea what that even is. The only forms I have thrown are:

  • mugs, cups, beakers, yunomi, etc.
  • bowls, of all sizes and types.
  • plates, platters
  • vases

I haven't made anything else, and the things I have made in these categories are pretty limited. But I am sure mine will need work, which will be helpful as you can draw a line on them in paint or something so others can see what they should be going for. I gather this is the goal of this post right? My bowls and plates should be near perfect though. I assume my cylinders will need some loving. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2017 at 8:01 AM, Pres said:

Hi folks, I have been thinking a lot of late of the types of things that would be good experiences for beginning throwers, withing to improve their throwing skills. so a few listings of ideas in this thread would be helpful for anyone wishing to develop greater throwing skills and control on the wheel.

Basic

  1. 9" cylinder with 3# of clay. This should have a flat bottom, evenly compressed, side walls tapering slightly in thickness to the rim that should be slightly thicker than the side walls at the top. Cut several horizontally in half to gauge your progress using a cutting wire from the base to the top.
  2. 8" diameter bowl with 3# of clay. Remember that a true bowl has a rounded interior, so when opening up develop a rounded bottom instead of a flat bottom as in the cylinder. Again cut several of these in half to check progress. Always remember that a bowl will need extra thickness at the base to support the outer walls from collapsing. 
  3.  10" plate with 3# of clay. Begin using softer clay, and make careful compression across the area of the plate, as the biggest problem with plates is the lack of compression causing "s"  shaped cracks.

Basic + Hump

  1. Vessel- small cup off of tennis ball size piece of clay.  Throw several off of a 4-6# Ball of clay, center the  entire ball as much as possible into a cone, then center the top portion of the cone into a tennis ball size, well centered. Throw a cylinder shape, use a rib  to define the base, and cut from wheel with a cutting wire, and remove to a bat. Repeat until all of the ball is used up.
  2. Bowl-throw several bowls using a baseball sized ball of clay off of a 4-6# hump of clay.  Try to make the form a bowl shape, cut and remove as in the vessel, and check progress.
  3. Apple baker-Start this form with a baseball sized piece of clay. Open the form as in a bowl, slightly away from center leaving a center stem area. Open the center stem area and pull upwards into  narrow cone, close the cone with your fingers, necking inward. Then finish shaping the outer bowl area. cut and remove from the wheel. Check progress with these also to assess the two pulled shapes in the single form.

 

 

 

These are just thoughts and I wouldn't have had the apple baker in this list until lately. However, I do believe that the simplicity and complexity of the form will help to improve throwing skills of anyone wishing to advance their skill level.

Please feel free to add projects that you believe that will advance throwing skills for a beginner, intermediate, or advanced thower.

 

best,

Pres

Small edit, Pres. In Basic 1. Cut cylinders vertically (we know what you meant, but if you print out for hand-outs) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few thoughts on Apple Baker

 

AppleBaker.jpg

AppleBakerTop.JPG

 

The throwing skills here are similar to a  bowl as it is a wide flared cylinder with a second interior cone wall. This form will expand your throwing skills. 

AppleBakersStacked.JPG

Benzine likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Baking apples. . . Tablespoon of water, teaspoon of butter, spices-I use cinnamon and ginger, sweetener(sugar, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey), as a diabetic I use none, others(nuts, granola, etc) Liquor(?) 

 

Apple baked 7 1/2 minutes in microwave oven. 40 minutes will work in a regular oven. Great Winter desert.

BakingApple.JPG

Benzine and Joseph F like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might for those of you that don't worry about the extra carbs that the crust added does. However, for me with T2 diabetes that I control with a tight diet and exercise, those crusts would kick my numbers into outer space. So I do the baked apple instead. Even if you don't use it, try it for a wheel throwing exercise.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the design of those and couldn't help but wonder what else you could use them for. Thought it somewhat resembles a lemon reamer. If the middle bit was a titch wider at the base you could carve sharp channels into the center part and if one of the scallops on the rim was sharpened a bit it could be the pour spout. I like having more than one use for pots,  it's got me thinking....

Babs likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Min said:

Thought it somewhat resembles a lemon reamer. If the middle bit was a titch wider at the base you could carve sharp channels into the center part and if one of the scallops on the rim was sharpened a bit it could be the pour spout. I like having more than one use for pots,  it's got me thinking....

Yes Min, the same process is used to throw a juicer for oranges and lemons. You have to start with a larger amount, 2-3# of clay. Center, and then follow pretty much the same, but make the center hole larger and pull to a low domed cone, then use ribs to make rounder. You can then do one of two after forming the bowl. use wet rib to put drain lines on the dome, or leave till later and carve. Before removing from the wheel add a pour spout to remove the liquid. The technique works in all sorts of ways.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Pres said:

Might for those of you that don't worry about the extra carbs that the crust added

It was meant as a joke Preston since we can't really eat fired clay

 

12 hours ago, Min said:

Looking at the design of those and couldn't help but wonder what else you could use them for.

Woodtuners make these and call them ring holders

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, I realized that, just pointing out that for some the need to do things differently is important. I haven't had a full cookie since 2009. 

 

I had not thought about ring holders. . . ceramic would work to. Wonder how many Apple Bakers have been re serviced as ring holders. Maybe someone didn't know what it was?

 

best,

Pres

Joseph F likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Pres said:

Ron, I realized that, just pointing out that for some the need to do things differently is important. I haven't had a full cookie since 2009. 

We stopped eating gluten, as it was tearing our stomachs up and making me and my wife ache. We didn't realize it but over the last 30 years we have developed a sensitivity to gluten. We have cut it out completely and feel much better. It is hard to do. I agree the apples look better with the pie crust deliciousness, but there is no way I could eat that now. 

I might make an apple baker. It looks interesting to throw and we love apples. Yum. I had forgot about this post. I need to throw the bowls and cut them in half too.

 

Edited by Joseph F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend that I bowl with, he was having severe health problems, and was finally diagnosed with a blood test for gluten intolerance. Now he has gained back up in weight, eats gluten free, and has gained back his strength. These things hit us as we get older and are weaker to fight them off, and it may be that our bodies reach a peak point where exposure becomes too much.

Joseph, if you post the bowls, that would be helpful. If anyone wants to share the print out, go ahead what its here for. Teachers also. Just don't take credit.;)

 

It would be nice to build a strand of beginning projects to help along those looking to gain/improve wheel skills.

best,

Pres

Joseph F likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it does.

Could not find a pic of Matt Long's whiskey cup. I have his video where he shows how to make this. Here is my knock-off whiskey cup.

 

Whiskey Cup.JPG

Edited by dhPotter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, RonSa said:

Woodtuners make these and call them ring holders

Oh, that's what I couldn't think of! Knew it reminded me of something. I can totally see making these as a learning exercise for new potters but was thinking in terms of selling them. So many customers saying they are looking to downsize or at least not add to what has already filled up their cupboards that a specialized pot would be harder for me to sell.

Not a drinker so I don't really get the whiskey cup, does the spiral in the middle start going round and round after a few? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, dhPotter said:

Yes it does.

Could not find a pic of Matt Long's whiskey cup. I have his video where he shows how to make this. Here is my knock-off whiskey cup.

 

Whiskey Cup.JPG

 

Why? I don't understand. What's going on with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Joseph F said:

We stopped eating gluten, as it was tearing our stomachs up and making me and my wife ache. We didn't realize it but over the last 30 years we have developed a sensitivity to gluten. We have cut it out completely and feel much better. It is hard to do. I agree the apples look better with the pie crust deliciousness, but there is no way I could eat that now. 

I might make an apple baker. It looks interesting to throw and we love apples. Yum. I had forgot about this post. I need to throw the bowls and cut them in half too.

 

FWIW#1

Cooking  is a passion and I bake my own bread.  I've had many people over the years say to me that they can no longer eat gluten but for some reason my bread doesn't bother them.

Since I don't really do anything special or buy any special flour except bread flour (hard flour to our friends over the pond) which creates more gluten when kneaded, I can only surmise that commercial bread has something added that bothers these people.

Of course this is not to say that people like my niece who has been allergic to gluten since birth can eat my bread. If you think you have a problem with gluten then you should get tested to make sure it isn't something else.

FWIW#2

I was gifted an apple baker years before I started throwing pots (like the one Pres displays) and they are horrible to bake in. I've found a glass Pyrex dish bakes an apple (without pastry) way better and in less time. Of course that is not to say they wouldn't be a great seller.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorta one step on from apple cooker, with Min on the one pot must be versatile in use to make it in my kitchen, same technique with bit extra, a candle stick holder, made by then opening centre core of clay , pulling up, turning down for flat rim, doing same to outer rim, attaching a little handle , wee Willie winkie style.

Min likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, dhPotter said:

Sputty,

Holds the chill longer?

The drinks seem colder and the second drink is definitely colder - less ice. 

OK - so sort of like a heat-sink in reverse? I've never seen anything like it. Very interesting.

I wonder if the French would be interested - the apéro (apéritif) is a way of life here, and whisky is - strangely - very popular. I might be able to convert my neighbours to a super-cooling vessel...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.