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Since there has not been a new question posted of late, I will ask one of my own.  Do you resist in any way when working?

Take it however you want in these times, but for me I will stick to using a resist when working with decoration or glazes on my pots. In the past I have used wax over glazes before spraying on more colors, used latex or shellac over leather hard clay before washing the pot with a sponge to carve a relief design, used wax on the bottom to protect bisqued areas from glaze for glaze firing, used paper resist to spray through designs, and used multiple layers of resist with spraying to create more complex designs. I have applied resist materials with a brush, a roller, fingers, aluminum foil, doilies, lace fabric, and other items. 

 

best,

Pres

 

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Yeah, when I read the topic title, I was thinking the same thing as Babs.  I thought it was a deeper question.  Like, "Do you resist conforming to certain ideas, in regards to Ceramics?"

 

As it pertains, to the real question, ever since seeing the process posted here, I regularly use resist, over an underglaze on leatherhard clay, to carve through, then use another color to create an inlay.    I've shown several students this, as well, to use on their projects, for precise detailing.

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I posted the topic, on purpose to raise a bit of discussion, Ben. Seems like I have.  I resist also at times, resist cleaning the studio, but not so much anymore since I want to live to a ripe old age still working on the wheel until I go of natural causes.

 

best,

Pres

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Marcia,

Those are excellent examples of the shellac resist possibilities. I find it easier to work with the shellac than wax, but use both. Thanks for posting.

 

best,

Pres

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Yes.  I've used paper and sprayed over it.

I've scribbled with crayons and glazed over.

I've used shellac and sponged away the surrounding clay.

I resist going to the studio (unheated greenhouse) when it's cold. 

I resist throwing away glaze, even though it's too old, and flakes off the pot as soon as it is dry.

59dce840cc0b5_FlakedGlaze.jpg.ca5fde9c5ab53b66c2cfdb1a39a8f7f8.jpg

D.M.Ernst likes this

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9 hours ago, Benzine said:

Beautiful work Marcia, but why is that one ware in a torture device?  Did it misbehave?

Thanks, Benzine. I like this technique and enjoy sitting and painting. That is a potter's easel used mostly by Spanish Majolica painters. I like it for working on round pots as it can be turned and also held at an angle.

M

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9 hours ago, Pres said:

Marcia,

Those are excellent examples of the shellac resist possibilities. I find it easier to work with the shellac than wax, but use both. Thanks for posting.

 

best,

Pres

I am a teacher at heart and examples are nice for explaining. 

Marcia

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Yes, great examples make for great teaching, and Marcia your Majolica rig has been in pictures before here, has it not? Either that or I saw a similar rig somewhere else. Either way, if I had not seen it before, I would have wondered like Ben.  On teaching, I was taught in my undergrad school not to do work in front of students, as that was grandstanding. However, as I seasoned, I realized that doing work in front of students even though not as a demonstration did many things for my teaching, an example of problem solving, completion of a process from a to z, reputation in that I did not just teach. Others also, but in the end more positives than negative. Especially if I never was so involved I didn't do job 1-Teach.

 

best,

Pres

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2 minutes ago, Pres said:

 On teaching, I was taught in my undergrad school not to do work in front of students, as that was grandstanding.

@PresI am curious here. What is the reason for this? 

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2 hours ago, Pres said:

Yes, great examples make for great teaching, and Marcia your Majolica rig has been in pictures before here, has it not? Either that or I saw a similar rig somewhere else. Either way, if I had not seen it before, I would have wondered like Ben.  On teaching, I was taught in my undergrad school not to do work in front of students, as that was grandstanding. However, as I seasoned, I realized that doing work in front of students even though not as a demonstration did many things for my teaching, an example of problem solving, completion of a process from a to z, reputation in that I did not just teach. Others also, but in the end more positives than negative. Especially if I never was so involved I didn't do job 1-Teach.

 

best,

Pres

where's the like button?

 

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When I said I worked in front of the students. . . I usually started a handbuilt pot with a demonstration. This demo would be about slab, coil, extrusion or combinations. However, these beginning pieces would take more than a day demo to complete well. Parts of the demo might be about decorating slabs, another demo might be about assembling slabs, another might be about following a scaled drawing. So in the end I killed a lot of birds with that stone. The students also saw a piece from beginning to end, and this often meant for me to work at a table right along with the students even though I was not demo. . ing. These pieces often got given to the district, auctioned off, or some gift to a visiting dignitary... . .yeah, Brownie points.

 

best,

Pres

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Marcia, 

I figured, that it was some type of prop/ support, for decorating.  That seems incredibly handy.  Is that something you built, or purchased somewhere?

 

Demoing for students, makes all the difference.  If you can show them how you get from Point A to Point B, even if they don't use the exact same process, it really helps.

 

I have no idea, what is going on with the "Like" button.  Sometimes I can use it for some posters, but not others.  Almost always, I can use it for my own posts, but yet, not others.  I mean, OBVIOUSLY I like what I'm saying, so noting such with a button seems redundant...

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Marcia and I don't have one. Anyone else that you notice, let us know. Admin is looking into this anomaly.  Hard to know as the user will not see if they have a like button.

 

best,

Pres

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you do. I just hit it!

11 hours ago, Pres said:

When I said I worked in front of the students. . . I usually started a handbuilt pot with a demonstration. This demo would be about slab, coil, extrusion or combinations. However, these beginning pieces would take more than a day demo to complete well. Parts of the demo might be about decorating slabs, another demo might be about assembling slabs, another might be about following a scaled drawing. So in the end I killed a lot of birds with that stone. The students also saw a piece from beginning to end, and this often meant for me to work at a table right along with the students even though I was not demo. . ing. These pieces often got given to the district, auctioned off, or some gift to a visiting dignitary... . .yeah, Brownie points.

 

best,

Pres

I like this, Res. But you can never "win the day" without a like button. 

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14 minutes ago, Fred Sweet said:

Awwwww, Marcia, now I don’t want a like button either!  ;-)

Marcia and I . .. well we're in a rather exclusive club!

 

best,

Pres

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I was curious to see if the topic would veer into more political commitment but I guess that was not the the point with this question.

Personally, since I don't sell my work as I am still in the process of learning, I can't say I resist in any way, politically & socially speaking but it has always been in te back of my mind. As a maker, how can I make meaningful work? The work of Ayumi Horie is quite inspiring in that regards.

Is anyone here trying to have a social or political stance through their work? Or is it something that is not part of the picture?

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