Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello!

I have recently made the transition from earthenware to stoneware to create mugs and dinnerware. I am fairly confident I applied the glaze to thickly to these mugs as I have made three and all three have small thin hairline cracks around the areas of thicker glaze... bummer.. a lesson learnt. 

I wonder if i can save these mugs though? The cracks are only on the outside surface there are no cracks to the bottom or inside. Shall I write them off (use might be dangerous) consider them seconds or try to repair the cracks? I have seen a few methods of repairing on google, I don't want the repairs to be too obvious, Would be nice if i could repair and re-glaze to blend the appearance of the repair. 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, I may be a little sentimental over these as they are my first function stoneware makes.. 

Emma

 

DSC03005.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think whether you want to repair them, or sell them as seconds depends on what image and reputation you want to build.

Every piece you sell will be out there, contributing to your public image. If you're not 100percent satisfied with it, I'd hammer it down. I personally think in the long run, it might work out better to have very high standards, but that's only my opinion.

 

I can't answer on the technical aspect of the refiring, sorry

Edited by Judith B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hammertime. DUN DUN DUN DUN 

Not worth someone pouring a nice hot cup of coffee going to sip it and the bottom cracks open and leaks hot coffee on their nice business suit. 

Very pretty effects though. If your attached to it, keep it as a pencil jar in your house or something. But as far as selling it. I would say no. You can make more and the new ones will be better.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you really need to keep something with such an obvious flaw? The time spent trying to repair it is much better spent on making another. One persons humble opinion.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Emma Jo said:

Shall I write them off (use might be dangerous) consider them seconds or try to repair the cracks?

Like everyone else is saying, hammer time. Except, first I would probably put them in the sink and fill them with boiling water, think the crack might then go right through the wall. Be an interesting experiment. 

It's really hard to tell by the picture but is there (thin) glaze going over the edges of the crack? If there is then the crack could be from a bisque dunt and was there before you glazed them. They can be really hard to see but smooth edges on a crack usually means it was there when the kiln fired up not down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what they said.  You will make many more pots.  As Joseph suggested save it for a pencil holder or vase.  Best piece of advice I ever got was "there are no precious pots"   You will learn from every single problem that you have in pottery.  And Min's suggestion was also spot on for future work!

Roberta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might save it up for one of those moments where you're so angry about a kiln mishap that you need to throw something for the sheer catharsis of it. You really don't feel bad about smashing things at that point! (And it allows you to hang onto the piece until you're ready to let it go.) Don't sell it or give it away with a crack that big.  It's a coffee scald accident waiting to happen. The crack will only enlarge with subsequent firings, or over time with use.

 

Seriously, you're going to make so many mugs in your time with clay, you're not going to know what to do with them all.  Take what you've learned from this one and apply it to the next dozen or so. 

Roberta12 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×