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Week 28

 

  1. A Weathering order chart of various minerals arranged in order of their resistance to weathering and decay lists _________________ as being the most resistant.

    1. zircon

    2. magnetite

    3. Ilmenite

    4. quartz

  2. For potters wanting to avail themselves of regional materials where they work, whether being marketed or not, a ___________ is a very important item of equipment.

    1. Potters wheel

    2. ball mill

    3. blunger

    4. pug mill

  3. To save kiln space is to save fuel, and this is what this remarkable piece of equipment is about. The saving of kiln space using ________________, as opposed to flat shelves, ranges from 20% for squat things like teacup saucers to an much as 60% for certain types of domed lid.

    1. Half shelves

    2. wadding

    3. setters

    4. posts

  4. My wife, May, and I have used a ________________ for many years to keep a precise control of glaze thickness.

    1. Graduated cylinder

    2. hydrometer

    3. triple beam balance scales

    4. measuring cups

 

This weeks questions come from The Potter's Alternative, by Harry Davis, c.1987, Chilton Book Company

 

 

Note from Pres: Recently there was a Question of the Week where there was curiosity of what book I would have if I only had one. I stated at the time, that it depended on the circumstances. In extreme need, I stated Pioneer Pottery. This book, The Potters Alternative, also meets the extreme need criteria and I believe is even more appropriate in catastrophic rebuilding society types of need. . . heaven forbid.

 

Answers:

  1. 4. quartz-Weathering order:quartz, zircon, tourmaline, magnetite, Ilmenite, white mica

  2. 2. ball mill-For potters wanting to avail themselves of regional materials where they work, whether being marketed or not, a ball mill is a very important item of equipment. A small ball mill (jar) is essential for experimental work at any time, but a larger mill makes it possible not only to exploit interesting materials which are not being marketed, but also to use valuable materials in bodies - also probably not marketed - that do not respond to treatment in a blunger. I refer to materials that do not slake in water, but offer very little resistance to the action of a ball mill. As explained elsewhere this often applies to potentially plastic materials as well. Incidentally, milling rather than blunging bodies is preferred by industry in some parts of the world. The choice would be governed by the character of the materials available.

  3. 3. setters-To save kiln space is to save fuel, and this is what this remarkable piece of equipment is about. The saving of kiln space using setters, as opposed to flat shelves, ranges from 20 per cent for squat things like teacup saucers, 50 per cent for bowls and as much as 60 per cent for certain types of domed lid. Setters are intended for use with high temperature wares, and are not ideal for earthenware - especially where a high-fired bisque is followed by glazing at a lower temperature. Setters are not suitable for items with handles, their essential role being for open shapes like bowls which have their greatest width at the mouth.

  4. 2. hydrometer- My wife, May, and I have used a specific gravity hydrometer for many years to keep a precise control on glaze thickness. Many glazes were used in more than one thickness, and this was also the basis of a number of decorating techniques. Striking colour contrasts are possible from a single glaze simply as the result of varying the thickness. Some people might deplore the use of an instrument of this sort, arguing that a good craftsperson should be able to sense these things by touch and feel. However, even when using an instrument such as a hydrometer, there are still many factors that lie beyond its control. It is still necessary to take room temperature, or at least the extremes of room temperature, into account, and to be aware of variations in the density of bisque ware. By using such a tool, a predetermined density, which in any case was originally decided upon empirically, can be repeated with ease. To be able to indicate to an assistant what a previously determined density was, is also useful. This was very much the case in Peru where we had the added difficulty of explaining such things to assistants with no background to help them sense what was required.

 

Note from Pres: Mr. Davis describes several ways of improvising to make equipment, one example being the use of an aluminum curtain rod to make a hydrometer.

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I'm in a quiz mode this am-I do not have this book.

1

2

3

1

Another #4 answer is -you will need a triple beam to make this measurement but a digital scale is also a new modern version that will work as well

My guess is this is the answer that you are looking for as the book is from the 80's

Edited by Mark C.

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On 10/3/2017 at 9:06 AM, Mark C. said:

I'm in a quiz mode this am-I do not have this book.

1

2

3

1

Another #4 answer is #2-you will need a triple beam to make this measurement but a digital scale is also a new modern version that will work as well

My guess is this is the answer that you are looking for as the book is from the 80's_I use my Graduated cylinder every time I make glazes but it requires a scale

 

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