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Marcia Selsor

what is your favorite wax resist?

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During the Sunshine Cobb demo/workshop this past weekend at the Red Lodge Clay Center, the topic of wax resist came up. One person said the Wax resist from Columbus Clay was a "game changer". in Montana, many people have used the Liquid Wax from Archie bray developed in the 1950s for Hamada's visit. I have been using Aftosa wax for several years because I can see it. Its blue.  Anyone have a favorite?

Marcia

 

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Ceramic Supply. Rinses totally clean out of brushes with just water. Never gums them up. Dries quickly and completely, not sticky. You can add food coloring to wax to make it easier to see. It takes a surprising amount to do the job.

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A Luddite here.  I still use hot wax.  Have good hood ventilation, a good temperature controlled pan, a fire extinguisher next to it, and I watch it like a hawk.  Have never found a liquid emulsion that works as well. 

BUT... I also do not do intricate fine-lined wax resist work.  Much bolder strokes for decoration.

best,

.......................john

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I have used some liquids in the past, but of late mostly hot wax. I have a tendency to dip bottoms on the chalices, for a super clean edge, and like to do the same on mugs and pots with foot rings that are cut to be feet. However, everything else gets wet washed to remove glaze from bottoms.

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My favorite 

I also use paraffin in a hot pan outside-the pan is 14 inches wide and we use it for all unfooted forms.

I need both types to make a living at this clay thing.

I think the ceramic shop in PA has this wax still-or so I was told.

Edited by Mark C.

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I have used hot wax diluted with mineral oil for a lighter coating at less heat. I have also used a variety of liquid wax. for masking I use liquid latex. I ike the edge it gives to sprayed on glazes.

Thanks for all your answers. 

So what is Forbes wax?

Marcia

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12 minutes ago, Marcia Selsor said:

So what is Forbes wax?

I don't know per say. I tried a bunch of waxes when I started. They all frustrated the crap out of me. Forbes is liquid and can be brushed and is almost instantly dried wax on the pot. It is odd because you can put it in a cup use it, then pour it back in the jar and it doesn't change consistencies. I don't know how it works. But it is beautiful. It doesn't gum up and get all nasty. Its just really nice.

Edited by Joseph F

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6 minutes ago, Joseph F said:

I don't know per say. I tried a bunch of waxes when I started. They all frustrated the crap out of me. Forbes is liquid and can be brushed and is almost instantly dried wax on the pot. It is odd because you can put it in a cup use it, then pour it back in the jar and it doesn't change consistencies. I don't know how it works. But it is beautiful. It doesn't gum up and get all nasty. Its just really nice.

who is the distributor?

 

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Forbes is a great wax resist when applied to bisque clay. It dries fast and is easy to clean up.  It can be somewhat hard to see when applied, so it's  a good idea to add food coloring to it.  However, it's not so good for applying over some glazes - it can peel away and leave a ragged edge. Sometimes thinning it with a little water can help overcome the overglaze issues.  Generally though,  Mobilcer and Aftosa are much better for overglaze work.  I think it this is because they are petroleum based.

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(Generally though,  Mobilcer and Aftosa are much better for overglaze work.  I think it this is because they are petroleum based)

Forbes is just to thin for me-I like the thicker wax even though I thin it down with water.It makes glaze run off super well and thats a plus as its less time sponging. Moblizer is easy to see without adding anything to it.It stays on even for many weeks if needed .

Since I now have a  near lifetime supply  wax is a non issue at least for another decade or more.

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Talking about resists, can anyone recommend a brand of shellac, ideally one that's available in the UK?    Unsure if some blend of shellac/resin from a DIY place would be suitable for resist work and 'hydroabrasion' (which I believe is the term).

Edited by hantremmer

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Any canned shellac typically used for woodworking will work, though there is no need to pay extra for the blonde/supper blonde varieties. Standard orange is fine as we don't care whether the finish will alter the natural color of the wood. An issue with shellac is it is alcohol based. You cannot wash out the brush in plain water, but must use alcohol solvent or - old painter's trick here - household cleaning ammonia for the initial cleaning of the brush.

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