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Rebekah Krieger

Kiln brick question

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Hello- it's been a while 

 

anyways I found some salvaged fire brick for .50 each at a salvage yard nearby. They are salvaged from an old coke kiln. The problem is, I'm a novice and have no idea how to  tell if they are high temp. I wanted to build a (slightly larger) version of the Phil Rogers test kiln for salt. His Book recommendation  is 42% alumina. Is there any way to tell one brick from another?  I don't want my kiln to collapse at low fire. I would like it to get up to 6-^8 so ^10 would be safer. 

Edited by Rebekah Krieger

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Rex Johnson    47

We salvaged bricks for our first kiln in 1972 from a some sort of smelting oven out in Trona, CA.

They were hard alright...and heavy. Turned out to be 3000+ degree bricks! Big diff from regular hard bricks.

Curious to see what you have.

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Rex Johnson    47

We realized it wasn't wise to use such heavy brick in the end so we used it for the chimney only.

We were building a cantilever arched kiln, and used regular hard brick. In hindsight I would have probably used high temp soft brick.

Things to consider are how long it will take to get the kiln to temp. Super hard furnace brick is going to take alot longer to heat up from what I recall.

However, if you're going to use it for salt, the tougher the brick the better I'd assume. Salt takes a toll on bricks.

Edited by Rex Johnson

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Mark C.    1,800

I would need to see the bricks-this new format is easy to post photos I think

Post some quality images of the whole brick as well as the name on front.

Make sure of the dimensions -are they 2.5x 4.5 x9 inch? 

Edited by Mark C.

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Joseph F    865
2 hours ago, Rebekah Krieger said:

 The book says that it is approximately 12 ft.³   It appears much smaller to me . 

Awesome. Is this what you are building? That seems like a really nice size to be honest.

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neilestrick    1,381

12 cu/ft would be a nice size. You can get a good amount of pots in it, but not take too long to fill. That's good since you'll likely be doing a lot of testing.

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The bricks did not have any  writing in picture. The guy said there are numbers but he wasn't tech savvy to send me pic (someone else took the main photo) he told me I was welcome to go down and look. It's an hour Drive in south Milwaukee so I will have to wait for the opportunity to check.  He said he had all sizes , s"some that look like a pie shape" (which I am hoping are arch bricks) I don't suppose anyone would be willing to fire a test brick for me... (my electric kiln has only been fired to cone 7

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This may end up being a great purchase.  They look like standard straights (9" x 4.5" x 2.5").  $0.50 per brick is a great deal if they are high-duty or better.  Chances are they are super-duty bricks or even higher.  I ended up using a mix of high, super, and whatever is even higher than that in my wood kiln.  The only downside to higher-temp bricks is some can be very difficult to cut.  I used a circular saw with a masonry blade to cut bricks and a regular high-duty brick will cut in just a couple seconds.  The really hard bricks could take minutes and eat up a lot of the masonry disk. 

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Mark C.    1,800

Rebekah

Go buy those bricks

I enlarged your photo and they have stamped names on them -meaning they are high fire bricks -buy them ALL.

There are a few different stamps from that photo but its all good -go get them NOW-call the dude back and say they are sold you are com ing to get them.

Mark

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Joseph F    865

 I really need to get my butt checking stuff like this out more often.    .50 cent a brick is amazing. Congrats! keep us updated when you build your new kiln!

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Mark C.    1,800

When you are moving those bricks-please post some of the stamped names on them for me. Since  most of my bricks are from the west coast I would like to learn some east coast -or midwest names.

I have some classics like Jaybfine-empire-stockton

 

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neilestrick    1,381

Yeah, I'd just buy them. It's a good price and they should work just fine, even if they're not as high in alumina as is ideal. I've built a couple of small salt kilns out of random used hard brick and they all worked well.

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