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Week 23

  1. To achieve deep surface texture with out the use of additives, brush _______________ onto the surface of a thickly thrown cylinder. Once the clay stiffens, stretch the form from the inside to bring out surface cracks.

    1. Course slip

    2. Terra Sigilita

    3. Sodium Silicate

    4. water

  2. After you have ____________ or ______________ a thickly thrown form, you can stretch the curves more by continuing to throw while pressing outward only from the inside.

    1. shaped, thrown

    2. fluted, faceted

    3. thrown, trimmed

    4. dipped, poured

  3. Since the mid 1700's , the printmaker's technique of _________________ was used to create detailed images on ceramic wares.

    1. Engraving

    2. lithography

    3. silk screening

    4. collography

  4. With little more than a _____________, a potter from the most sophisticated – or the most primitive -culture can embellish a piece with___________ lines.

    1. wiggle wire, perpendicular

    2. comb, parallel

    3. stamp, stamped

    4. none of the above

 

This weeks questions come from Surface Design for Ceramics, by Maureen Mills, paperback c.2011, Lark Ceramics Publications

 

Note from Pres: Another book with different approaches to surface design. Excellent book, but then there are so many of these out there. One other note is it also has an image of pot by John Baymore. 

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When doing multi answer blank questions I put them into the sentence to see how they fit. If they do not seem to fit, I throw that answer out, and continue eliminating until there is only one answer. Takes a few seconds, but it usually works.

 

best,

Pres

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Three-Two-One-Two, sit down, jump up, turn around and clap. Repeat until dizzy. I lucked out on the one I didn't know, cuz I have this wonderful book. 

Edited by LeeU

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Here are the answers to the Pkqw #23 . . .

Answers:

  1. 3. sodium silicate_To achieve deep surface texture without the use of additives, brush sodium silicate (a suspension agent usually used in casting slip) onto the surface of a thickly thrown cylinder. Once the clay stiffens, stretch the form from the inside to bring out surface cracks.

  2. 2. fluted, faceted-After you’ve fluted or faceted a freshly thrown form, you can stretch the curves more by continuing to throw, while pressing outward only from the inside.

  3. 1. engraving-From the mid-1700's the printmaker's technique of engraving was used to create detailed images on ceramic wares. Engraved onto a copper plate, coated with potter's ink, and printed onto a prepared tissue, the image was then gently transferred to the clay surface by pressing across the back of the tissue. Thin, clear glaze was applied over the top. While blue was the most common color produced, the work could also be brown, green or yellow depending on the temperature to which the piece was fired.

  4. 2. comb, parallel-With little more than a comb a potter from the most sophisticated – or the most primitive -culture can embellish a piece with parallel lines. If you get the chance, take a look at Karatsu wares from seventeenth-century Japan.

New question to be posted tomorrow . . .

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@S. Dean

Thank you so much for sharing, I had no idea they were done this way.

Found this video filmed at Stoke On Trent that shows the whole process.

I wonder though, what do they use for ink? I was very surprised to see they could just wash the paper under water without the ink running off

 

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