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BlackDogPottery

Cream Glaze Recipe

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Hi Everyone.

 

I'm trying to make a glaze that's white but on the warm cream side. I already have a good recipe I like that makes a solid white without any kind of oxides (tin) that is a little too sterile... I'm firing to hot ^5- cool  ^6. Any options on making it creamier like adding a little Iron oxide? I'm afraid it would make it green like I've seen some Iron oxide glazes go. I have added granular rutile to this before and it was nice just not what I was looking for. 

 

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by BlackDogPottery

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

My personal preference is rutile for this. 2% will give a cream color in many bases. Iron is a stronger colorant. You may not need as much to get a cream. 

maybe 1/2 % for iron. Depends on the many varieties of iron. As always, testing is required.

Marcia

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GEP    863

I agree with using Rutile. But try powdered Rutile, not granular Rutile. Granular Rutile probably gave you freckles of tan, not an overall cream.

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RonSa    189

On Marcia suggestion I tried rutile and experimented with 1% to 6%  in 1% increments to see what happens. I wound up liking 3% best while 2% and 4% also looked good.

 

6% at a good ^6 with a 10 minute hold had a couple of bubbles which refiring got rid of.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

yes powdered Rutile. Granular anything is not a colorant but used more for speckling clay bodies. I have never seen granular rutile. But light toned powder rutile is one of my favorite colorants for toning glazes to my taste.

 

Marcia

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Joseph F    866

I didn't think of rutile. Not only will it probably mix better and leave you with no speckling issues, but the titanium in it will also add visual interest to the creamy glaze. 

 

Good plan!

Edited by Joseph F

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Do some experiments with different opacifiers: tin, zircopax and titanium dioxide. They all make different whites. I find tin by itself is quite soft, zircopax by itself is quite stark, and titanium can wind up yellow in larger quantities. Play around with them mixed together.

 

I've found that rutile sends the base glazes that I use more towards a beige than a cream. It depends on what you're looking for.

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I agree with using Rutile. But try powdered Rutile, not granular Rutile. Granular Rutile probably gave you freckles of tan, not an overall cream.

 

Any ideas about the kind of rutile? I was looking for some and came across Rutile Light and Rutile Dark not sure what to choose.

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My personal preference is rutile for this. 2% will give a cream color in many bases. Iron is a stronger colorant. You may not need as much to get a cream. 

maybe 1/2 % for iron. Depends on the many varieties of iron. As always, testing is required.

Marcia

 

Will do. Testing testing testing

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GEP    863

 

I agree with using Rutile. But try powdered Rutile, not granular Rutile. Granular Rutile probably gave you freckles of tan, not an overall cream.

 

 

Any ideas about the kind of rutile? I was looking for some and came across Rutile Light and Rutile Dark not sure what to choose.

I use Rutile Light, and that's what I recommend for you as well, if you are trying to make cream.

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Pres    896

Rutile, one of the best things around to make light tan or cream. At the same time if you read the books that have been printed in the last 10 years, Rutile does quite a bit for glaze stability and durability. I believe it does helps to create nice crystals in the glaze also. I also use Rutile light.

 

 

best,

Pres

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oldlady    1,323

working with the glaze book, i re-discovered what you might want.  the name is Tom Buck's cream breaking red and it is for cone 6.  i made it years ago and do not remember its original color.  later it was combined with another glaze to make a lovely, dark purple.

 

cream breaking red

feldspar G200              41

gerstley borate             22

whiting                           9

strontium carb                3

silica                              25

 

add

tin oxide                         13

red iron oxide                   6   mine is spanish

 

i looked for the test tile but my records start with my use of little loafers clay in 09 and there is nothing earlier.  one of the first tests mentioned adding this glaze to Teal to produce a pale teal and then turning it all to purple.  was a great color but now it is gone.

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image_zpsabzlxjbm.jpg[/URL]

the one on the left is the standard recipe - the right is the one I use- I substituted 2%tin and 5% rutile to get the pink color. 

 

Note - it looks horrible on the brown stoneware.  That I use

Edited by Rebekah Krieger

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