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Steve@EFP    0

I've been firing kilns for over 40 yrs using a welding shield, but am having trouble seeing the cones at cone 9-10 reduction firing.  It may be my eyes, but I'm wondering if anyone has some tricks to make the cones more visible?

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LinR    10

I'd love to know that secret too. I've had all sorts of suggestions none of which worked.  The only thing that does work for me is having a clear space from my peephole to the cones and clear behind those to the back of the kiln.  But then I have a small kiln.  Good luck.  I'll be watching to see what other people do.  Lin

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

a while back someone suggested brushing a stroke of cobalt was on the back ridge. I tried it but it didn't help. I think the best is the clear area to see the brick pattern behind the cones as LinR says.

Marcia.

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JohnnyK    87

I've tried gas welding goggles but the cones are hard to see, so the next firing I will try my arc welding lens. I'll let you know what happens.

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rakukuku    122

our technicians use a hair dryer to blow flames away from the peep hole to see the cones. 

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RonSa    189

I can't help but wondering if blowing air into a peep hole can change what is happening or supposed to happen to the cones?

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oldlady    1,323

ron, sometimes having an imagination in overdrive is not a good thing.

Edited by oldlady

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Mark C.    1,807

A few notes on this - putting chemicals on cone' s can change the temp they melt .

Blowing on cones with hair dryer can also affect cone melt temps-John Baymore-posted a note on the tech reasons on this

I personally have blown with my mouth gently to help-

Welding glazes are the best way and placing a chunk of soft brick behind the cones.Think as this as a visual backstop . This can be a thinner and small piece of soft brick ,so cut  it so it does not take up much space. I do not do this but I do pay attention to whats behind the cones and how it will look thru the spy hole-also make sue the view is a side view not one where they fill towards you .

Edited by Mark C.

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RonSa    189

ron, sometimes having an imagination in overdrive is not a good thing.

 

da Vinci imagined flying like a bird and a few hundred years later the Wright brothers accomplished that. A few decades later we landed on the moon.

 

Philippe Kahn in 1997 was so excited about his new born daughter that he cobbled together a cell phone with a digital camera to share images of her to his friends while he was still in the waiting room. He had called a friend to run to Radio Shack to pick up the parts he needed. The first cell phone picture was taken and the rest is history. http://100photos.time.com/photos/philippe-kahn-first-cell-phone-picture

 

An active imagination is a good thing. If you don't use it you lose it.

Edited by RonSa

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Mark C.    1,807

Factiod

Radio Shacks are all gone-out of business-tansy corp is no more.

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RonSa    189

Factiod

Radio Shacks are all gone-out of business-tansy corp is no more.

 

Sprint bought them, then got sued by the creditors who claimed that Sprint sabotaged the brand name. Radio Shack was auctioned off and in July 2017 Kensington Capital Holdings bought it for $15 million . Of the approximately 5000 stores in 2012 there are 70 stores still open under the RS name.

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Mark C.    1,807

OK I'm corrected -The drive to fox lake Il is a bit far for me.

I saw a few dozen closed stores this month while driving up to Anacortes and back this month.I have yet to see one thats open anymore.

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GEP    863

RE: eclipse glasses

 

I saw an opthalmologist on the news say that SOME welding goggles could be used to view the eclipse. I knew that kiln goggles are welding goggles, so I looked into whether I could use my kiln goggles to view the eclipse. Turns out that welding goggles come in different shades. You need #14 goggles to view an eclipse, and most kiln goggles are #5.

 

In other words, eclipse glasses are too dark to look at cone packs. And you can't use kiln goggles to watch an eclipse.

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LinR    10

Blowing into the kiln can also mean that you might blow the crumbs of soft brick in the peep hole all over your glazed pieces.  If you do blow in be careful to intake your breath turned away from the peep hole.  Lin

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Rex Johnson    47

...thought it was just me but yeah, looking into a high fire reduction kiln the last couple firings, I could not see a thing.

Tried blowing into the peep but dude...either I'm loosing lung capacity or just facial hair, or both.

What's the answer ?

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cabako    9

I am doing an oil firing this friday or saturday to hopefully cone 10 in reduction.  I have a 3-4 inch large peep hole forced /air entrance point.  I have the cones in direct line of sight but they are towards the back of the kiln...not sure how this is going to work out.  I plan to use only dark sun glasses to see in...

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JohnnyK    87

Dark sunglasses won't work. I've used gas welding goggles and they didn't work well. I'll probably be doing a bisque/glaze firing this weekend and plan on checking the cones using an arc welding lens. I'll let you all know how it works.

JohnnyK

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Mark C.    1,807

OK heres the deal looking into kiln can hurt your eyes you need PROTECTIVE eyewear-Lighter wielding glasses will protect you-sunglasses will not.

Do some research and get the right eyewear -they  are sold at almost every ceramic shop and online .

There has been a lot written about this subject so just use the search button to find those posts.

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neilestrick    1,381

I always used #5 welding goggles, which are what you would use for oxy-acetelene welding. Arc/mig welding goggles are #10, and are probably too dark. Sunglasses are not adequate.

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