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Diz

Making 'breakable' Cups

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Diz    2

Yes - we want the cups to break.  I have a request from our local theater group for cups that will break when a toast is made.  Haven't had this request before so I would like help to do it the correct way the first time (as they need them within 2 weeks).  My first thought is to throw them very thin with my cone 5 clay and have both firings just go to bisque and use cone 05 glazes.  Your opinions on this method or better ways to do this would be appreciated.  I also have cone 10 clay available to use.

 

Thanks!

Diz

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Tyler Miller    331

I was asked to do this two years ago when I fell in with some theatre people. Ceramic is unsuitable for breakaway props. Industry uses a thin acrylic for this. One, because they want non-sharp edges, two because they want something light that won't injure actors or, worse, audience members. The glaze can be sharp, and clay is heavy. Picture Stanley Kowalski's plate smashing and bottle breaking with real ceramic--the actors would need safety glasses

 

Proper breakaway props have nearly no mass, very light. Also, very cheap. Like, a six pack of beer bottles was around $20 USD?

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tricetra    4

If they just want some for show eg not to hold any liquid, then why not use dried green ware and paint with acrylic paints that way there is no sharp edges ;-) just an idea. xx

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bciskepottery    925

A friend used bisque ware for breakable items in a theater production.

 

I understand in some countries, small shot-size bisqued cups are used in place of disposable plastic, etc. by some street vendors -- drink the tea and then smash the cup on the ground back into clay.

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Diz    2

yes , Tyler's comment makes perfect sense and I will pass it on.  Thanks for the input - safety first.  I appreciate the comments and help.

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Mark C.    1,797

Bake it out of cookie dough like a fortune cookie-will break easy

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Denice    243

Maybe you could do a low fire bisque on the Cone 10 porcelain, it would be nice and white and smash easily.  Do you have a test kiln and time to test some ideas.   Denice

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I like the greenware idea, however it doesn't give the same satisfying SMASH sound.. hehehe
(Does anyone else smash their cracked or chipped bisque with gusto??)

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oldlady    1,323

no, i use a hammer.  where do you find a gusto?  :rolleyes:

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On 8/27/2017 at 0:57 AM, Stone Spiral said:

I like the greenware idea, however it doesn't give the same satisfying SMASH sound.. hehehe
(Does anyone else smash their cracked or chipped bisque with gusto??)

Unfortunately I don't , they tend to make it to glaze and hated after that! ;) haha

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Benzine    609
On 8/24/2017 at 10:48 AM, Tyler Miller said:

I was asked to do this two years ago when I fell in with some theatre people.

I just love that phrasing, "Fell in with some theatre people"...

"That Tyler, he was on a good path, until he got mixed up with those performing arts folks..."

In regards to the question, sugar glass is what they usually use for any prop glass (bottles, windows, etc.)  It breaks like glass, with little chance of injury, and the ability to snack on the resulting pieces.

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