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Potter's Quiz of the Week: Week 21

 

  1. For spraying glaze on pottery, many consider the best solution to be the _______________.

    1. Atomizer

    2. Gravity feed

    3. Siphon feed

    4. All of the above

  2. When choosing brushes for most glazing, which type of bristle material seems least appropriate of the following, goat hair, badger/squirrel blends, hogs hair, and synthetic/natural blends.

    1. goat hair,

    2. badger/squirrel blends,

    3. hogs hair,

    4. synthetic/natural blends.

  3. A glaze opacifier that is often passed over in contemporary practice is _______________, as it has a tendency to promote crawling where thick; and can cause chrome fuming when using some stains, chrome and even rutile(some rutiles have small amounts of chrome). For the above reasons and because it can be expensive many potters are replacing it with other opacifiers, or using a combination that uses _______________ at around 4% and some other opacifier like zircopax.

    1. Zinc oxide

    2. Titanium oxide

    3. superpax

    4. tin oxide

  4. A specialized technique using _____________ is may be used in conjunction with naked raku, choride fuming, and other types of low fire glaze firing. Interestingly enough, ___________ does not carbon trap, so it allows a contrast between the clay and the ________________ surfaces.

    1. silica

    2. silicone carbide

    3. mica

    4. terra sigillata

 

This weeks questions come from Glazing Techniques, Edited by Anderson Turner, c. 2015, The American Ceramic Society

 

Note from Pres: This is a compendium of several articles form Ceramics Monthly(I believe), you will find it very informative when looking for help on most glazing techniques. It even has a section on brush making.

 

 

 

Answers:

 

  1. 2. Gravity feed-. . . . but for spraying glaze on pottery, there is a better choice, a gravity-feed spray gun. These are usually smaller in size, intended for holding only a small quantity of liquid, and easy to wash out. The container is located on top of the gun and fluid drains into the gun by gravity, not pulled up by suction. For our purposes, the gravity-feed gun is the only way to go.

  2. 3. Hogs Hair-Natural hair brushes are usually the best option for glazing. However, not all types of natural hair brushes will work. While hog bristle brushes are made with natural hairs, these stiff, white hairs are not the best option for glazing. Goat hair is also a white bristle but has a plush, soft feel and is a favorite for many artists. Badger hair and blends of soft hair like squirrel also make fine brushes for use with engobes and glazes. The final type is a blend of natural and synthetic bristles. These brushes vary, depending upon the combination of hairs. Some natural bristles are soft and limp when loaded with glaze. By adding some firmer synthetic or natural bristles within the soft hairs, the brush can hold its shape better and give nice coverage.

  3. 4. Tin oxide-The use of only tin as an opacifier is often modified in contemporary practice. Tin makes a lovely, buttery, very opaque, white glaze. It also increases surface tension in a glaze and may aggravate crawling problems where the glaze is thick (e.g. in corners). Tin in amounts of 5% or above will also cause a color reaction with small amounts of chrome that will cause the tin glaze to turn pink (chrome fuming). This can be delightful if anticipated, but is often not kind to your color plans as a surprise. Many of the green and teal stain colors and some black stains contain chrome, and some rutiles contain small amounts of chrome impurities that can cause chrome-tin pinking in high-tin glazes. For the above reasons, as well as the expense of tin oxide, many artists today use a zirconium opacifier, or a combination of some tin (for denser whiteness) with some zirconium opacifier. This would keep the amount of tin low (say under 4%), yet allow good opacity. Zirconium is weaker than tin in strength, and the usual rule is 1.5% zirconium to replace 1% tin. If chrome-tin pink fuming is a problem, drop the tin a bit, and add that amount multiplied by 1.5 of zirconium opacifier.

  4. 3. Mica-Mica, a mineral often used in cosmetics for it shimmery essence and in electronics for its insulating properties, is a very refractory mineral. It easily withstands the 1472°F (800°C), (cone 015), temperature a lot of bare-clay ï¬ring techniques call for, making it ideal for using in several low-ï¬re techniques such as naked raku, ferric chloride saggar, horsehair ï¬ring, clay saggar and pit-ï¬red ceramics. Detailed explanations of these ï¬ring techniques are well covered in the book Naked Raku and Related Bare Clay Techniques published by The American Ceramic Society (www.CeramicArtsDaily.org/bookstore).

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Wow I have no idea, my knowledge about materials is really insufficient but I'll try

 

1. 3 (the first teacher I had used a siphon feed spear gun, and the second one a gravity feed spray gun which both worked really well so I'm not sure...)

2. 3

3. 1

4. 1

 

Looking forward to seeing the answers

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Sorry folks, but all fours is not cutting it. I didn't think this was extremely difficult, but harder than what I have been doing of late. I does refer to some obscure minerals, and some other things, When dealing with this material sometimes it was difficult to find a distrator so sometimes a generic all or nothing is the only last choice. Remembering also that this is according to the articles in this book.

 

Sorry for the difficulty,

 

 

best,

Pres

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I know of a lot of folks who make/made their own brushes. Over the years I have used all of the brushes for different things. I used to use hogs hair to apply slip, til I found better ones, I have used natural and blends for most everything else. Love Hake brushes for large areas and brush marks. Like a brush to hold lots of glaze without dripping. I have a few Asian mop type brushes that I use also.

 

best,

Pres 

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I had a potter friend who made his own brushes usually from road kill or hunting carcasses. White tail deer are very popular sources for brush makers in Montana. Deer, skunk and raccoon are not on list.

My friend's brush strokes varied according to the material. beautiful work.

 

Marcia

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Sorry folks, but all fours is not cutting it. I didn't think this was extremely difficult, but harder than what I have been doing of late. I does refer to some obscure minerals, and some other things, When dealing with this material sometimes it was difficult to find a distrator so sometimes a generic all or nothing is the only last choice. Remembering also that this is according to the articles in this book.

 

Sorry for the difficulty,

 

 

best,

Pres

I think there are more options than the book refers to. If one does not have the book, than yes, it is very difficult.But still fun and educational!

Marcia

Pres likes this

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OK since these are from a book I never read I'll go out on a limb guessing-actually I have taken CM since the early 70's so I most likely read this stuff-the bigger question is do I still recall any of it?

drum rolllllllllllllll

2

4

2

4

Edited by Mark C.

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