Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am meeting with an architect this week who will be designing my new studio. The concept is this: a main clay workspace that is 36x36'; a closed off, but connecting 44x16' space that will be divided up into "clean" studio with office, a  kiln room and a storage room.  There will be a small bathroom, and heat throughout (heated concrete floor), but no cooling. The sealed off kiln room will be ventilated to the outside in addition to having an opening window (two electric kilns). My raku kiln is outside. 

 

My concerns are:

 

---ventilation in the clay space: I plan on having multiple opening windows, as well as a double garage door that can open for clay deliveries and airing out. I very conscious of dust, and clean up continuously, but you know how it is!  I am on the water, so there is often a breeze to help/hinder when windows are opened. Suggestions? 

 

---lighting? There will be multiple solar tubes installed,  clerestory windows all around. Right now the debate is: Built-in ceiling LED lighting (flood) or use hanging LED Shop lights that can be moved/adjusted if need be. Shop lights require cleaning..built in's not so much. Thoughts?

 

I do about  50/50 handbuild and wheel work...any other thoughtful advice in this planning process? ---This is not my first studio, but it is the first I have built from scratch and I am very excited. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pamela,

I used to have a large studio in my HS that I taught at. An air cleaner as long as you are putting money into this would help you a lot. I had one similar to this in my classroom:

 

https://www.baileypottery.com/Bailey-Pottery/Product-Details/ProductName/%20MODEL-1800H-HEPA-AIR-CLEANER-C1369

 

At the same time, I think you need to consider can LED in the ceiling. We recently redid a kitchen, and the can lights are great. I have LED's in my present shop, and wipe downs occur every couple of weeks, but again to LED's of any type are the way to go especially if you get daylight bulbs. YOu never know when you will want an evening studio bash/kiln opening sale and the lighting is important.

 

I don't see anything about a sink trap, or sludge trap. I used a Gleco trap in the studio in the last few years at the HS, and it worked very well, was easy to clean, and had replaceable sludge bottles. I really think you should also consider your sink situation. 

 

best,

Pres

 

I'll keep thinking.

douglas and PamelaLBL like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you! We are planning a large double work sink with a sludge trap for both sinks to drain into. I am on a septic system, so really have to be careful. I will, besides the under-sink trap, be using the ol' pvc pipe set upright in the drain trick! I recently installed LED lighting in my home, and love it. The only question I have, is that it is not "mobile" should I decide to move work tables, slab roller, wheel location etc. after being in the studio for a while, which is why I am considering the LED shop lights, (which I currently have in my existing space.) 

 

 

So much to consider!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pamela,

I used to have a large studio in my HS that I taught at. An air cleaner as long as you are putting money into this would help you a lot. I had one similar to this in my classroom:

 

https://www.baileypottery.com/Bailey-Pottery/Product-Details/ProductName/%20MODEL-1800H-HEPA-AIR-CLEANER-C1369

 

Do you run the cleaner when the studio is empty of people? Otherwise, wouldn't there be dust particles flying about for one to inhale?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what a wonderful problem!  do not cover your tables with cloth- canvas holds dust at all times.

 

use slate for a wedging table, get it from a billiards dealer who has a broken table.  or get a large piece of bluestone, flagstone, whatever it is called in your neck of the woods.

 

build everything you can on wheels of the proper size, they are inexpensive at harbor freight.  

PamelaLBL and LeeU like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the LED hanging lights. Mark C. recommended them to me for my new studio. I love the light.

I would sit down and draw out the flow chart of process...making clay, wet working for hand building and wheel, drying, bisque firing, glaze mixing, glazing.

Firing again. Plot out the work flow. Have as much as possible on wheels, 

 

Marcia

PamelaLBL likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cleaner is quiet enough that it could be run when people are in the room, however, we would run it during clean up time, and leave it running between classes and after school when working in the studio cleaning.

 

best,

Pres

PamelaLBL likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggest 4 foot led lights-direct wired . That means they operate on 120 volts. The covered shop lights that holds 4 bulbs are cheap-they have a plastic lens cover so the only dust would be on top surface .

The bulbs are at LED-king on eBay for about 11$ each

The fixtures are bought elsewhere locally.

When planning a new studio work flow is the most important from clay in to work out -think that thru a lot .

Rolling Carts are the ticket .

I would put in a air dust circulator hanging  above that is 1 micron

I'll add more later

PamelaLBL likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get good lighting. What ever that entails is totally worth it. I work in a garage with meh lighting at night, which means I don't work as much at night because of it. One of the things I want most is better lighting. I just need to get my butt in gear and light up my garage. But my to-do list is absurd.

 

Congrats on building your own studio. I hope to do this in 5-10 years as well when we move and buy enough property for me to build a pottery studio and a kazagama!

 

Please update us with pictures so we can all live through you!  B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the dust info

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/13039-ceiling-mounted-hepa-air-filter/?hl=delta&do=findComment&comment=95402

When thinking about work flow think how to avoid moving it as much as possible in the less steps.

duct control info:

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/14523-clay-studio-hepa-vacuum-with-cyclonic-separator/?hl=vacuum

since your space is so large I world consider a rolling vacuum unit that is hepa-they make them cheaper in the construction field than in the clay feild.

The bags are spendy.

 

As to cool breezes place your windows to make the most of that breeze .

A high window and low one for kiln room to vent is best so the heat rising will vent well

I would put an exist fan in that room up high as well for summertime heat.

Is this going to be profession ? clay work as that may change my thoughts some?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good input, thanks so much! As this is not my first studio, I have all the equipment (though do we ever have all we need?) and a solid idea of my personal work flow and space needs. The main workspace is actually a bit larger than I would like (adds a few extra steps!) but I am building it looking at future property resale value---it will be designed to easily convert to a three car garage with workshop and office when I am dead and gone. I do not want it to look like a converted garage, but a space designed for my work and enjoyment.  I am lucky in that I have an excellent contractor and an architect who understand function and clean space. I will be participating in local studio tours and will be the host sales space for other local artists during these tours, but not sharing actual workspace on a regular basis. 

 

Air filtration is a big deal to me, not only for my lungs sake, but for my granddaughters as well---they both love playing in the mud, but not sure how serious either will be. Meanwhile, I want their little lungs kept healthy!  The kilns will be individually vented, and the kiln room in addition to having an opening window, will also have an exhaust system.

 

LED lighting is the way to go I believe, and built in with the addition of plenty of ceiling receptacles to add hanging fixtures if needed as suggested! One of my pre-requisites is lots and lots of outlets! 

 

Having everything possible on wheels is definitely a must, yes! 

 

No separate glazing room---just a totally separate area off the kiln room entrance; however the kiln room large enough to mix glazes in. 

 

Does anybody have any plans or know a source of plans for wheel tables? You know, where the wheel is inset in a surround? My google skills must be poor, because I can't seem to find any.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One last thing about the LED, multiple switches! As in a kitchen where you have multiple work areas, a studio also is the same. I love the fact that an island has a separate switch for two cans over it, and counters have lighting under cabinets on separate switches, and general lighting on other switches.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes, as to the table with the wheel built in.  mine actually rests on the part of the table that the manufacturer made.  the legs of the table were measured from that height to make the table useful.  let your carpenter see the table and for any good workman, that should be enough.  i have pictures that i took today.  naturally, it is a messy place, it is a studio.  i do not use a splash pan so if you want one, modify something.  look for them in my gallery.  the way to do that is click on my avatar right here and when the page goes to my profile, click on gallery just below the avatar..  look for the studio setup.  it will take awhile, lots of pictures.  and naturally, the one you want is the last instead of the first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome, I'd love to setup my own studio from scratch some day.

 

Some things I'd include in my own studio:

- Drains in the floor.  You're in a garage, so I suppose you're ok to hose out the doorway.  Heck, I want this in my house!

- Plywood walls, not sheetrock.  Ability to hang stuff anywhere is a huge benefit, as is the resistance to water so you can simply hose down the walls on cleanup days.

- Recessed can lights, on multiple switches + track lighting system.  Use can lights for regular stuff, use track lights for spot light/directional/gallery

- Gallery space.  Some sort of clean, white, gallery-like space you can use for presentation or for photographing/documenting your work.

- ALL furniture on locking casters so you can move it around by yourself.  Don't get the cheap Harbor Freight ones, they don't have good lock options, get good quality casters in higher weight capacity than you'd need.

- Air scrubber/cleaner for indoor air quality.

- Compressed air system for general use or for pneumatic extruder.

- Lots of electrical outlets (on GFCI in case you get wet on cleanup day and because wheel throwing).  Also at least 1-2 drop-downs from ceiling for misc tools or supplemental lighting, etc.

- Spray booth or some sort of setup that will collect overspray and dust from glaze spraying or dry grinding on kiln shelves, wares, etc.

- Glaze mixing area/table, dry chemical storage, wet glaze storage.

- Sink trap and hazardous waste container.

- Central vacuum system, so I can vacuum up stuff without having shop vac in room and to keep dust down/no sweeping

- Stereo system that goes to 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×