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glazenerd    816

John:

I did some quick reading, and speaking for me only: think the problem runs deeper than that. The whole theory of Darwinism is based on the rise of mankind out of the African continent. So, in order to establish and confirm that theory, development and migration followed that premise. Accepting evidence to the contrary would pose questions: cannot have that! Showing bias in the factual historical record is never a good thing.

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glazenerd    816

The history of Porcelain.

 

There is no precise date to separate the production of proto-porcelain from that of porcelain. Although proto-porcelain wares exist dating from the Shang Dynasty (1600–1046 BC)

 

By the late Sui Dynasty (581–618 AD)and early Tang Dynasty (618–907 AD) the additional whiteness and translucency had been achieved.

 

By the time of the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644 AD), porcelain wares were being exported to Europe.

 

Eventually, porcelain and the expertise required to create it began to spread into other areas of East Asia, during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD). Ding Ware became the premier porcelain of Song Dynasty. Porcelain was exported to the Persian Empire during this time; and Persian porcelain was developed shortly after.

* dates generalized due to lack of exact information.

 

By the time of the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644 AD), porcelain wares were being exported to Europe. In 1517, Portuguese merchants began direct trade by sea with the Ming Dynasty, and in 1598, Dutch merchants followed. The first mention of porcelain in Europe is in Il Milione by Marco Polo.

 

Meissen Porcelain 1708

 

Von Tschirnhaus and Johann Friedrich Böttger were employed by Augustus II the Strong and worked at Dresden and Meissen in the German state of Saxony. A workshop note records that the first specimen of hard, white and vitrified European porcelain was produced in 1708.

 

Soft paste porcelain.

 

Saint-Cloud manufactures the first soft paste porcelain bowl1700–1710.

Chantilly porcelain, soft-paste, 1750

The pastes produced by combining clay and powdered glass (frit) were called Frittenporzellan in Germany and frita in Spain. In France they were known as pâte tendre and in England as "soft-paste".

 

William Cookworthy discovered deposits of kaolin in Cornwall, leading to the development of porcelain and other whiteware ceramics in the United Kingdom in 1768. Cookworthy developed the original formula for the now famous: English bone china.

 

The European name, porcelain in English, come from the old Italian porcellana (cowrie shell) because of its resemblance to the translucent surface of the shell.

 

(Urban Legend) porcelain was discovered accidentally at Meissen (Germany), when after plowing a new field; the farmer scraped the white clay off the hooves of his horses.

 

Nerd..information sourced from Wikipedia

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Pres    896

John:

I did some quick reading, and speaking for me only: think the problem runs deeper than that. The whole theory of Darwinism is based on the rise of mankind out of the African continent. So, in order to establish and confirm that theory, development and migration followed that premise. Accepting evidence to the contrary would pose questions: cannot have that! Showing bias in the factual historical record is never a good thing.

Glazenerd,

 

While much of what Darwin wrote has been proven true, there are theories out there that there were several pockets of change bringing about modern man. At the same time, we are constantly rewriting history based on archaeological finds. For example a 14K old village in British Columbia that shows man was in the Americas much earlier than previously reckoned. So I will not refute or stipulate, only keep an open mind.

 

 

best,

Pres

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