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oldlady

Percentage Of Water To Glaze Ingredients Is ?

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oldlady    1,323

it was not too long ago that i saw the weight of water and ingredients for a typical 100 gram test batch of glaze.  something like 66 %  i think.  have looked up water and percentages here and only find things that are years old.  i am trying some new glaze recipes and i just want an idea of how much water to add to my 100 g of ingredients.  then i can test, test, test.

 

does anyone remember this?

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neilestrick    1,381

It totally depends on what's in the glaze. Glazes that are high in clays and feldspars will take more water to get the same viscosity as those that are low in clay and high in frits.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

that's what I would think too.The content would determine what it needs for water %. I usually put the water in the bucket first and then as the glaze chemicals. I err on the side of too little water which is easy to add. 

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

yes, Dick. That's about what I use in my blender for tests. 100 grams in a 1/4 cup. But when I am mixing 2000 or 10000 gram batches I tend to put less than anticipated water into the bucket leaving room to add. I think it is preferable to put some water into the bucket first and then add the dry mix. it 

Marcia

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Dick White    155

Marcia, we are on exactly the same page. For big buckets I know about how much total water will be needed and add about a quart less than that in the bucket and stir in the dregs from the bottom and brush down the sides with that color's toilet brush stirring brush. Then I add the dry materials as I measure them out, starting with the clay materials. Stir vigorously with the toilet brush after each addition. Starting with the clay materials creates a "soft" landing to immediately suspend the later "hard" materials that would otherwise sink straight to the bottom and hardpan. When all is in the bucket, I sieve it through 30 mesh into a spare bucket I keep just for mixing, still using the same toilet brush, and then put 2 cups of fresh water in the now-empty bucket to clean it out the last few lumps and through the sieve. Now I put an 80 mesh sieve on the first bucket and sieve the glaze back into the original bucket, using another cup of fresh water at the end to swish out the bottom of the bucket. At this point, I am only about a cup of water short and I test my way into the correct specific gravity. When done, I have only one bucket and 2 sieves to wash.

 

BTW, you mention blender tests. Did you know that thread size on the bottom of the Oster or Hamilton Beach brand blender pitcher is the same as a common mason canning jar? (Waring brand is not, only Oster or Hamilton Beach.) I put the test batch ingredients in a mason jar, set the blade and gasket on top, screw on the base, and flip it over onto the blender to buzz it. Then just put a lid on the jar to keep the test batch for additional line blends, etc. And, if your blender is Oster, you can get spare blades designed for milkshakes or ice cubes depending on the glaze/slip materials you are mixing.

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RonSa    189

speaking of mixing I found this paint mixer that fits perfectly into a mason jar. I cut the shaft to make it more comfortable to use

 

2592.jpg

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I tend to mix everything a bit on the thick side, usually about the consistency of pudding. If you do it like this, use about 1/2- 2/3 the amount of water to dry material, and give everything about half an hour (or longer) to slake before you try mixing. I sieve twice, using the water from rinsing all the mixing equipment, sieve and containers to thin the end glaze to the consistency I want, adding more water if necessary. It's a lot easier to add water than it is to take it out.

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Min    784

Lady, is any of this relevant if you are spraying your glazes when they are thick as pudding? For little 100 gram tests just mix it up so it looks like whole milk, after its slaked for a couple hours if there is a lot of gb or clay in it, and do single, double and triple dips to get a rough idea of what it looks like. 

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I just want to clarify: I don't leave anything pudding thickness. By the time I'm done rinsing everything, the glaze is usually in the milk level of consistency. I find it's just easier to adjust if you start off a bit thick to sieve

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PSC    54

On average i think a pint of liquid per pound of dry but i always mix less water for a think mix cause of the same as Callie ,after cleaning up and making sure you got all the glaze slurry in the glaze container the glaze get watered down.

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oldlady    1,323

i am so embarrassed.  i found the post i had been looking for and tried to remove the original about an hour after it went up.  messed up and deleted the reply instead of the original post.  it was 66% and it was in answer to a RonSa question about making glazes.  

 

the test is sitting there waiting for me to finish it now that it has absorbed all that water.  (clearly not enough)

 

i have been sorting stuff in the studio and throwing out pieces that have been around in the sort of maybe save it but you really do not like it piles that accumulate.  the trash truck comes today.  hope he has a lot of room.

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Here in Japan the "test tiles"  (actually sake cups) usually have samples of the glaze in question at various viscosities.  The differences for the same glaze can be startling, particularly regarding how the glaze interacts with the underlying clay body.   For example, a transparent feldspar/ash over a lightly iron bearing clay will be like green/gray celadon when thicker, and baby pink when thin (see Hagi ware).   So I guess it is not a question of what is "correct", but rather a question of what effect you want.

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