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Pres    896

Week 15

Preamble note from Pres: As wheel throwing to me is pretty individual, with many different techniques of opening up, pulling and so much else, I have had a difficult time with choosing questions this week that are not just opinion. After all, I would rather folks could answer the questions without having the book. Not that this particular book is not full of excellent hands on projects, techniques and processes. For beginners, and some intermediate throwers it is worth looking through or owning.

 

  1. The essential elements of a pot, all of which have an effect on its overall______________, are named as if they were body parts.

    1. Texture

    2. proportions

    3. shape

    4. form

  2. Unlike the cylinder, the walls of a ___________ aren't usually thrown to a uniform thickness; walls are thicker near the base fo support the form to prevent it from collapsing.

    1. Plate

    2. teapot

    3. bowl

    4. dish

  3. When learning to throw, after each of your first few attempts, ________________________to study the thickness throughout will allow you to fucus on the areas that need improvement.

    1. Feel the interior and exterior walls

    2. cut a cross section through the center

    3. use a needle tool in several places

    4. use calipers

  4. Several smaller objects or a grouping of objects to be assembled may be thrown by the technique known as __________________________.

    1. throwing off the “humpâ€

    2. extrusion

    3. pulling handles

    4. hump molds

This weeks questions come from text in Ceramics for Beginners, wheel throwing, Emily Reason c. 2010, Lark Books, a Division of Sterling Publishing.

Note from Pres: This text I purchased after retiring. I bought it with the idea that adults in the Winter HS classes would find it useful. I has been very handy, for them and at times even for me. It is surprising how many solutions that you know, that sometimes you forget.

 

 

Answers

  1. 4. Form -The essential elements of a pot, all of which have an effect on its overall form, are named as if they were body parts. . .

  2. 3. Bowl - Unlike a cylinder, the Walls of a bowl aren’t usually thrown to a uniform thickness; walls that are thicker near the base help to support the bowl’s curve so that it doesn’t collapse as you throw it.

  3. 2. cut a cross section through the center - As you practice throwing cylinders a good way to see how well you've distributed the clay throughout a thrown piece is to cut through each of your first few attempts with a wire tool and view the cross section.

  4. 1. throwing off the “humpâ€- Throwing off the hump is a great way to throw several small pieces from one large lump of clay. You wedge only one piece of clay, and from it create multiple lids or spouts-or even tiny pots-that would otherwise be difficult to center effectively because they’re made with such small amounts of clay.      

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

This one is tough. What is the difference between form and shape? 

1-2

 

2-3

 

3-2

 

4-1

 

Marcia

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Judith B    52

Wow these are tricky. I'll go with 

1 - 2

2 - 3

3 - 2

4 - 1

 

But yeah I second Marcia, what is the difference between for and shape? Is it a 2D/3D difference?

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LeeU    330

Form vs. shape made me pause as well. Thinking about it, I figure form is applicable to the three-dimensional structure (form) of a pot, whereas shape references areas such as the shape of a design, brushed or drawn in glaze onto the form of the pot, or the square shape of a tile.

 

Anyway--4;3;2;1.

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Pres    896

Yes, shape is flat or 2 dimensions, whereas form is in 3 dimensions. Throwing is in 4 dimensions!  :blink:

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