Jump to content
augal

Kiln Not Reaching Temperature In A Reasonable Timeframe

Recommended Posts

I have an olympic kiln model s23 he .  I just put new coils in it, fired the kiln empty the first time as instructed, it fired ok on a slow bisque to 04.  the next firing I did a bisque firing to 04, and it seemed to take a little longer than I remembered i thought but dismissed it as imagination.  The third firing was also slow bisque to cone 04, after 24 hours it was still firing and had reached 1650.  I shut it down, the bartlett controller did not show an error. What can cause this to happen?  Would the connectors not being tight enough cause this to occur?   It is still cooling and I am searching for answers while I wait .   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you fire an empty kiln after installing the elements and watch that the elements all fired red hot. Lid needs to be full open. I did have this happen with my Duncan and found my top set wasn't firing. I would check all the element connection to make sure they have a good locked on connection. 

Also you can check the amp on the power cord. 

I do not know anything about this kiln. I couldn't find it in a google. give us some more details. Is it Manual with a kiln sitter or digital electric?

 

If nothing else call Olympic Tech support number: (800) 241-4400

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all elements are firing, when i fired it empty i checked through the peephole, i suspect the connectors as i had a very hard time getting them crimped .  thank you for the response and the tech number.  tomorrow when it is cool i will check the connections.  i had wondered if that could reduce amps 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The crimps need to be very firm-the right tool is needed and some hand strength .Any loose connections will make for excessive heat at that point.

Lets see what Neil says he's the electric kiln repair guy here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i found a loose connection and one very loose connection that had heated. you are right about the hand strength needed, i had a hard time .  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use them - large amp connections use them all the time.Crimps are cheaper and many manufactures use them.As long as you have clean wire as well as the right size connector.THE RIGHT SIZE IS MOST IMPORTANT AS THE SCREW NEEDS TO LAND ON ALL THE CONDUCTORS. ops caps on

I would use conductive copper coat as it takes heat well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is odd that the controller didn't put up and error code. It must have been firing just fast enough to keep it happy.

 

Crimp connectors on kiln should be outlawed. It's difficult for many people to get them tight, and if you mess anything up it's really difficult to fix it. Make sure you're using a tool that's made for crimping, not just a pair of pliers. I use a tool like THIS. Those connectors that Min showed are good, although the allen wrench head on the screw is a bit unwieldy. I really like the ones Paragon uses, although they require a ring terminal on the end of the feeder wires. They're the easiest to use, though, because the element and feeder wires don't have to fit into the same hole and you can use a nut driver to tighten them. For running test where elements need to be unhooked they can be beat. The downside is that they're ridiculously expensive. You get new ones with new Paragon elements, but buying them outright is pricey for a little connector. I've often considered making my own since brass is easy to drill and tap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another simple DIY connector is to simply use a nut and bolt. Bend the element pigtail into a circle, put a ring terminal on the feeder wire, and bolt them together with a washer on each side. I still see those on old kilns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my old days as an electrician we used brass split bolts -

they are very easy to get tight-this is was they look like and they come in all sizes.

I'm not a Home Depot fan but this is the image I was looking for.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Blackburn-6-SOL-STR-to-16-SOL-STR-Split-Bolt-Connector-6SBC-B2-5/100165861

 

On a side note Neils photo of a crimper is the ONLY kind to use-no pliers as he noted.

You only have one chance with your element pigtail with crimp why risk it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all of you have been very helpful, i need to replace one insulator as the bottom one got too hot because it was loose and damaged one end of the insulator at the connection.  the best place to get them is???? and would lowes have the high temperature connectors like it on there?  I do have a crimping tool, my dad did a lot of electrical work, wish he were here to oversee me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at the paragon connectors, they pose another question, the ring terminal that goes on the power wire....does it have to be a special one ? if i am not mistaken they are also crimped on arent they? 

My crimping tool is exactly like Neils but for me it took two hands to squeeze it near hard enough.  It was very hard for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use brass or copper connectors .No aluminum

I cannot say about a big box store as we do not have any in this county.

I'd buy them online as Neil suggests-get the right size or a size assortment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thank you both,  i did find the brass ones at the big box stores

the addition of a ring connector holds me back from the paragon,  i assume it cannot be the usual for electrical use. as you can tell i normally wire lights and normal things that you can use the wire nuts on :} just saw Neils response about ring connector,  i will figure it out, you all have helped point me in the right direction and given me enough information to as they say ...get it done! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×