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Pres

Pottery Knowledge Quiz Of The Week (Pkqw): Week 7

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Hi folks, again we have another quiz based on a book. I chose some of the questions this week to clarify terms that I have heard potters use interchangeably when they shouldn't be, so be careful.  

 

 

Week 7

  1. _______________ is the ability of liquid to penetrate and be distributed through a material. It specifically relates to the working action of a dry clay surface when in contact with water.

      1. Porosity

      2. Shrinkage

      3. Marbling

      4. Absorption

  2. _______________is the quantity of the pores or voids in a clay body.

      1. Porosity

      2. Shrinkage

      3. Marbling

      4. Absorption

  3. _________ _____ is caused by a contamination in the clay, best described as a half moon shaped pit in the pot, with a light or dark nodule in the center. This can occur immediately after firing, or several years later as calcium chloride expands.

      1. Contaminated grog

      2. Lime pop

      3. Alkali salting

      4. Wet blistering

  4. Preventing S-crack formation in pottery in thrown pottery is dependent on __________________ alignment of the clay platelets during the throwing process. Much of this is dependent on the coning , opening up, and compression stages of the throwing.

      1. Linear

      2. asymmetric

      3. concentric

      4. random

This weeks questions were taken from text in The Potters Studio Clay & Glaze Handbook, Jeff Zamek, 2009. Quarry Books

Note from Pres: I could have gathered hundreds of questions from this book, but chose those which I thought would be of interest to the largest audience. I believe that I will return to some books after some time to add more. For those of you interested in glazes, and clay bodies, this is a well constructed and informative text.

 

Answers:

  1. Absorbency and Porosity (Answers to both 1 & 2 are included in the text here) 1. (d) Absorption 2. (a) Porosity

  2. Two terms that are frequently used interchangeably but describe different conditions ore absorbency and porosity. Absorbency is the ability of liquid to penetrate and be distributed through a material. It specifically relates to the wicking action of ct dry clay surface when in contact with water. Porosity is the quantity of pores or voids in a clay body.

  3. ( B) Lime pop occurs when moisture in the air comes into contact with a carbonized lime nodule, causing its expansion in an unyielding tired clay body. This can occur when the pottery is removed from the kiln. li can also happen years later, as lithe expands (in the torm at calcium hydroxide). Lime pop is a semi-elliptical 1/8- to 1/2-inch (3- to l3-mm) crack in low-temperature bisque or high-temperature fired ware. A conical hole reveals a black or white nodule (lime) at the bottom.

  4. © concentric  See image below.     

post-894-0-17080200-1495051116_thumb.jpg

D.M.Ernst likes this

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I love wrangling with my ancient memory via these PKQW things (tho I can't seem to retain the acronym long enough to write it, even after double & triple checking it).

My best shot:

1-(4) absorption;

2- (1) porosity;

3.  (2) lime pop, and;

4- (1) linear. (My reasoning-dim memory, probably wrong-is that concentric platelet algnment (i.e. as in wheel throwing) is an imposed, continual, single directional curve-so it is the combination of the spin on top and along the length of the linear platelets that helps prevent the S crack. 

Edited by LeeU

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1. 4

2. 1

3. 2

4. 3 (revised from 1 although I think that the clay platelets are aligned linearly with each other in an overall concentric shape)

Edited by S. Dean

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