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nancylee

Ok, I'm Asking An Incredibly Simplistic Question

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I'm swallowing my pride and asking cause I have been playing with this, and I can't figure it out. Let's say I take a greenware pot and carve into it. I want to have one color in the carvings, and another on the surface. I understand how to get the first color into the recesses, then wipe away the color from the areas that are not recessed. How do I get color on the unrecessed areas without messing up the color in the recesses?? I thought of wax, but sometimes I have hundreds of dots, or squiggles, etc. It would take forever. Do you bisque fire the greenware with the first color in the recesses and then add the second color? 

 

Another issue I'm having trouble with: I put black underglaze (or engobe) on greenware and carved through it. I then put underglaze on the piece and wiped away the extra. Much of the black came off as well, showing the raw clay. Do you put the second color on after bisquing? I can't get a neat and clean look no matter what way I did it. 

 

Thanks - I know these seem basic, but I'm playing with adding colors and having a lot of questions/failures. 

Nancy

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You are close to the right answer. You can solve both of your questions with wax. Regarding your second question, after you apply the black underglaze, coat the entire piece in wax before carving the designs for the second color. Carve through the wax, brush on the second color, then wipe away the excess of the second color. The wax will protect the black underglaze from being wiped away. Bisque fire once.

 

This answers your first question as well, apply the color for the unreccessed areas first, coat with wax, carve the recessed design through the wax, apply second color, then wipe away the excess.

nancylee and D.M.Ernst like this

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You are close to the right answer. You can solve both of your questions with wax. Regarding your second question, after you apply the black underglaze, coat the entire piece in wax before carving the designs for the second color. Carve through the wax, brush on the second color, then wipe away the excess of the second color. The wax will protect the black underglaze from being wiped away. Bisque fire once.

 

This answers your first question as well, apply the color for the unreccessed areas first, coat with wax, carve the recessed design through the wax, apply second color, then wipe away the excess.

Thank you, Mea!!! I do suffer from a non-mechanical mind. I have a really hard time figuring out things like this. Book smart, mechanical stupid, that's me!! Much appreciated! 

Nancy

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Alternate method would be to put one color of slip/underglaze on, then apply a second coat of underglaze(second color) over top. Carefully carve through the first color exposing the second color. You may even carve through both exposing the clay underneath thus getting three values in the decoration.

 

Wax is a wonderful thing, using wax decoration over clay creating designs in the wax, and then washing with water will etch the wax design in to the clay.  Very fun!  However make certain your kiln and area is vented well, as the fumes are not something you want to be breathing.

 

 

 

best,

Pres

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Alternate method would be to put one color of slip/underglaze on, then apply a second coat of underglaze(second color) over top. Carefully carve through the first color exposing the second color. You may even carve through both exposing the clay underneath thus getting three values in the decoration.

 

Wax is a wonderful thing, using wax decoration over clay creating designs in the wax, and then washing with water will etch the wax design in to the clay.  Very fun!  However make certain your kiln and area is vented well, as the fumes are not something you want to be breathing.

 

 

 

best,

Pres

Thank you!! That's a really cool idea!! I think I saw the multiple colors/layers  in a Korean master potters video on youtube!! It was beautiful! 

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nancy, i tried to explain what i did to have a blue surface with white lines in the carvings to a fellow potter.  it was blue slip that i carved through, covered the entire bowl with a white matte glaze and fired it..  she asked several times more "but how did you get the white lines?  it took 5 times for her to understand that white glaze on white clay makes white lines.  it even worked on 112, a buff with specks.

post-2431-0-57401700-1493661424_thumb.jpg

post-2431-0-57401700-1493661424_thumb.jpg

Sallyd, nancylee, Roberta12 and 3 others like this

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This is exactly what I would recommend. :) I do a ton of decoration this way. Probably on 60% of my work is done with wax resist. :) 

 

And yes, vent the kiln or stay WAY out of the way when you're firing, the fumes are nasty. The kiln at my dad's is in a shed outside. The last time I fired I had to run back over a couple hours later because I forgot to put the plugs in. Ugh so nasty. I did it as fast as I could while holding my breath. 

 

One thing, Nancy: I have heard Forbes wax resist is really good but I have never used it. I have a gallon of unfortunately discontinued Laguna wax resist that I love. It sets within about half an hour (as long as it's not incredibly humid) and when I carve through it the wax very rarely rips or peels off. I have tried Amaco (works great but takes overnight to set up) and Aftosa (horrible! horrible! lumpy, clumpy, uneven, takes forever to dry and peels right off when you start carving) and I cannot recommend either of them for the reasons I mentioned. 

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nancy, i tried to explain what i did to have a blue surface with white lines in the carvings to a fellow potter. it was blue slip that i carved through, covered with a white matte glaze and fired. she asked several times more "but how did you get the white lines? it took 5 times for her to understand that white glaze on white clay makes white lines. it even worked on 112, a buff with specks.

Are you sure that wasn't me? LOL! I am that thick!

Those are fabulous, BTW!

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This is exactly what I would recommend. :) I do a ton of decoration this way. Probably on 60% of my work is done with wax resist. :) 

 

And yes, vent the kiln or stay WAY out of the way when you're firing, the fumes are nasty. The kiln at my dad's is in a shed outside. The last time I fired I had to run back over a couple hours later because I forgot to put the plugs in. Ugh so nasty. I did it as fast as I could while holding my breath. 

 

One thing, Nancy: I have heard Forbes wax resist is really good but I have never used it. I have a gallon of unfortunately discontinued Laguna wax resist that I love. It sets within about half an hour (as long as it's not incredibly humid) and when I carve through it the wax very rarely rips or peels off. I have tried Amaco (works great but takes overnight to set up) and Aftosa (horrible! horrible! lumpy, clumpy, uneven, takes forever to dry and peels right off when you start carving) and I cannot recommend either of them for the reasons I mentioned.

 

I'm not sure what wax I have. It seems fine. Set up pretty quickly.

My kiln is out in the big garage which at this time is still open to the outside. When we close it up, maybe someday before Imdie, I'll have to buy a vent system. :)

Thank you?,

Nancy

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thanks, nancy.  no, it is not being thick, it was her being distracted and unable to listen and concentrate for more than a minute.  and also trying to make something so simple very complicated.  i cannot paint so carving is my thing.  and brushing wax is the absolutely worst thing i can imagine doing.  i have wax that i purchased back in the 70s and it is unopened.

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thanks, nancy.  no, it is not being thick, it was being distracted and unable to listen and concentrate for more than a minute.  and also trying to make something so simple very complicated.  i cannot paint so carving is my thing.  and brushing wax is the absolutely worst thing i can imagine doing.  i have wax that i purchased back in the 70s and it is unopened.

I hope you know that I was saying that I am "thick." Not you or the wax!! :)N

Nancy

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thanks, nancy.  no, it is not being thick, it was being distracted and unable to listen and concentrate for more than a minute.  and also trying to make something so simple very complicated.  i cannot paint so carving is my thing.  and brushing wax is the absolutely worst thing i can imagine doing.  i have wax that i purchased back in the 70s and it is unopened.

The interiors of the two bowls at the front would tell me you're not bring entirely truthful about your I ability to paint Old Lady! All these are lovely! Carving is my thing too.

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nancy, i tried to explain what i did to have a blue surface with white lines in the carvings to a fellow potter.  it was blue slip that i carved through, covered with a white matte glaze and fired.  she asked several times more "but how did you get the white lines?  it took 5 times for her to understand that white glaze on white clay makes white lines.  it even worked on 112, a buff with specks.

 

These are GORGEOUS. Do you paint on the matte white glaze and then wipe it off, leaving it in the carving? 

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giselle, the secret is the matte white glaze.  it is translucent.  the same as my avatar.  the glaze covers the very blue slip just enough to make it the color you see.  the entire exterior is covered in the white glaze.  these, like most of my work, were greenware, single fired after the glaze was sprayed on.  and the slip was simply the clay slurry with cobalt added.  simple.

 

it is just as simple as my previous post describes, slip, carve, glaze, fire.  no wax, no work.  all done.

 

celia, the flowers are stroke & coat applied with tiny sponge teardrop shapes glued to  short pieces of chopsitcks.  Q-tips add the dots of yellow in the centers.

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celia, the flowers are stroke & coat applied with tiny sponge teardrop shapes glued to  short pieces of chopsitcks.  Q-tips add the dots of yellow in the centers.

 

Well it certainly works and looks lovely!

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