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Hi I have recently purchased a Skutt 1027

Specifications:

Model:   KS-1027
Volts:    208 
Amps:   48
PH:       1 

 

Is it possible to upgrade it to get up to cone 10?

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Interestingly, skimming through the tech specs on the 1027s on the Skutt website, several are listed as maximum temperature 2250F = cone 10. Others list max temp 2250F = cone 6. I think the Skutt tech specs are a bit garbled?

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Interestingly, skimming through the tech specs on the 1027s on the Skutt website, several are listed as maximum temperature 2250F = cone 10. Others list max temp 2250F = cone 6. I think the Skutt tech specs are a bit garbled?

 

If you look through the Skutt specs on that kiln, they list the 3" brick version as cone 10, but the 2.5" brick version as cone 6. it doesn't make sense to me, though. The L&L kiln of the same size is cone 10 for all brick thicknesses and wiring configurations. So I'm not sure what's going on with the Skutt. Even with the difference in brick thickness I would expect it to get to cone 8.

 

The big question here is whether or not gejoreni has 208 volt service. If it's going in a home studio, then the kiln will need to have the elements replaced with 240 volt elements, which will then make it a cone 10 kiln.

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@neil, Thanks all for the quick response. So that's actually something I overlooked  - I purchased this kiln used in a bid (my first kiln). I do not believe I am wired for 208 - but it's going to be near a breaker - I wonder if it's better to have it wired or just replace the elements. I'm expecting i'll have to replace some of the elements anyway. I got (what I think) is a great deal I paid $120 for it on a gov surplus website - I have to drive three hours to pick it up tho :(

 

the link

https://www.publicsurplus.com/sms/auction/view?auc=1821933

 

Is it realistic to change the elements on this? my dad is an EE so I'm sure he could help me with the details but maybe a couple quick tips would be nice. 

 

THANKS!

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You need to find out if your service is 240 volts or 208 volts. Is it going in a house? If so it will be 240 single phase. The elements have to match the service. You can't put in 240 volt elements if you're running on 208 volt service or vice versa.

 

As for porcelain, get a cone 6 porcelain. Firing to cone 10 will burn out your elements really fast, especially with 2.5" bricks. If you've used some cone 10 glazes in gas kilns before, they won't look the same in an electric because you can't fire in reduction in an electric. Embrace cone 6. :)

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Ok - I'll stick cone 6. I read this is a great one: http://www.lagunaclay.com/clays/northeastern/wc617.php

As for switching from 206 to 240 - is that just a matter of changing the elements?

 

Yes. Figure out what you've got for service and order the corresponding elements.

 

Do you have the outlet for the kiln wired up yet? You'll need a 60 amp breaker for that kiln. Code requires that the breaker be 25% greater than the draw of the kiln. That kiln draws 48 amps on single phase, so a 60 amp breaker. I'd get it all wired up and test the kiln before ordering elements, in case you need switches or other parts, too. If it's got the old interbox plugs (the black pugs between the sections), those are a weak point in the system. If you've got the money, get the upgraded boxes that are hard wired together. That will come with a new wiring harness, which is a good thing to do, too. I don't think it comes with feeder wires, though, so also get those if you replace the elements. Wiring is cheap, and a good thing to replace in an old kiln. Also replace any bad bricks when you replace the elements. If you have specific questions about which parts to order, call Skutt. They have great customer service and will set you up.

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Looking at the photos at the same time you do the elements replace the top ring of bricks as well. You will, need to take them out which will be easy once the elements are gone. The top row is toast and to many are broken. Get these from Skutt as well as your elements all at once-look to see what other bricks need replacing once you have the kiln as well.

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Mark, I'm starting to think this deal may not have been as sweet as I was originally thinking :). Looking at the outlet plug it almost looks like it's converted to 240. Or does 208 look that way too? Is the top row of bricks a must have or should have. Curious if I can postpone some of these costs. This is getting expensive fast.

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Looking at the photos at the same time you do the elements replace the top ring of bricks as well. You will, need to take them out which will be easy once the elements are gone. The top row is toast and to many are broken. Get these from Skutt as well as your elements all at once-look to see what other bricks need replacing once you have the kiln as well.

@mark - watching this video - it would appear the damage may not need repair. I'm curious if your experience would say to replace those bricks.

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What I noticed in the photos is the bottom element is completely out of the bottom groove. That needs to be replaced or you can try to get that back in-Neil has the best advice on this.

The bricks in the front -4-5 of them are busted up bad from top loading and putting weight on them-hence they broke off.

The absolute best time to replace them is when the element is out-so if you replace the elements replace those 4 to 5 bricks -one or two in the photos needs it bad-since its no longer making a seal on the lid-so yes I would replace them otherwise you will cook the bands and the band on the lid.

There are a lot of plug configurations and 240 or 208 could be the same plug-I'm not that savoy on plugs since there are many many types-your kiln plate says 208 so I would assume that -if you do not have 208 where you are and you have 240 then you need new elements as Neil has outlined.Whatever your home power is 208 or 240 you have to stick with that and get the same elements.

As to the paragon brick video your top brick are way worse than any in that video-You need 4-5 new ones on the top front ring..

You got a good deal on it but if its the wrong voltage its got to be fixed and if thats true put the new bricks in when the elements are out.The plate says cone 6-so call Skutt and ask about an upgrade and whats needed as Neil has suggested-he is the Electric Kiln guy here.

You got a great buy on this kiln you just need to sink some more $$ to finish the job-ceramics is not cheap no matter how you go.

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On the plug question, the configuration of the prongs is the same for both 208V and 240V. It varies by amperage, i.e., you can't put a 30A plug into a 50A receptacle. The plug on the cord in the picture looks like the proper 50A plug, just an after-market replacement.

 

208V service is very common (but not universal) in commercial settings but sometimes is 3-phase and sometimes is single phase. 240V is always single phase. It is highly unlikely that you would have 208V service in a residential neighborhood. If a kiln is wired for single phase, the only real difference between 208V and 240V is the resistance of the elements to generate the same amount of heat inside the kiln. 208V elements can be run on 240V circuit of the appropriate amperage (which Neil covered) - it will just heat a little faster and the elements will burn out sooner. 240V elements will work - badly - in a 208V commercial setting. They just won't get hot enough to reach cone 6; cone 06 probably, but not much higher. The solution is easy, just replace the elements with ones designed for the available voltage. If you change them, it would be good practice to mark on the rating plate the new voltage so nobody is confused in the future.

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On the plug question, the configuration of the prongs is the same for both 208V and 240V. It varies by amperage, i.e., you can't put a 30A plug into a 50A receptacle. The plug on the cord in the picture looks like the proper 50A plug, just an after-market replacement.

 

208V service is very common (but not universal) in commercial settings but sometimes is 3-phase and sometimes is single phase. 240V is always single phase. It is highly unlikely that you would have 208V service in a residential neighborhood. If a kiln is wired for single phase, the only real difference between 208V and 240V is the resistance of the elements to generate the same amount of heat inside the kiln. 208V elements can be run on 240V circuit of the appropriate amperage (which Neil covered) - it will just heat a little faster and the elements will burn out sooner. 240V elements will work - badly - in a 208V commercial setting. They just won't get hot enough to reach cone 6; cone 06 probably, but not much higher. The solution is easy, just replace the elements with ones designed for the available voltage. If you change them, it would be good practice to mark on the rating plate the new voltage so nobody is confused in the future.

A+ answer - This is perfect. My plan is to test it when I get it - if all but 1 of the elements work I might replace just the 1 at 208 - then when the rest burn out replace all with 240. I've got jenken about 30 minutes away from me. You think I would be able to use their elements? I wonder if they are the same configuration - could save some $ and time that way. anyway this forum is amazing. 

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I've got jenken about 30 minutes away from me. You think I would be able to use their elements? I wonder if they are the same configuration - could save some $ and time that way. anyway this forum is amazing. 

 

 

No, put Skutt parts in a Skutt and Paragon parts in the garbage and buy a Skutt... :D

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I've got jenken about 30 minutes away from me. You think I would be able to use their elements? I wonder if they are the same configuration - could save some $ and time that way. anyway this forum is amazing. 

 

 

No, put Skutt parts in a Skutt and Paragon parts in the garbage and buy a Skutt... :D

 

 

lol - yes sir! I'll get them direct.

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