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Pres

Qotw: Do You Like Innies Or Outies?

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Chilly    331

I was going to answer and say I've only made one lid, and that was an innie.  Then I thought while reading all the comments, and realised I've actually made 6 lids.

 

And

 

Yes, they were all innies.  As a hobby potter it seemed to be the easiest way to get them to fit the pot.  Slab lid in shallow bowl shape, allow to firm up, set on bowl with gallery, and trim to fit.

 

Allow to shrink and fire together for bisque, separately with lid on stilts for glaze fire.  Lid with circle unglazed inside.

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RonSa    189

Ok, so I have 3 different types of lids, numbered. Take a vote on what you would call an innie, and an outie. The second number 3 is for a teapot as the longer galley into the pot will help to hold the lid on.attachicon.gifLidForms-1.jpg

 

 

best,

Pres

 

I was thinking of a fourth type of lid that is typically found on a ginger jar.

 

I didn't throw this

post-80153-0-02362300-1492086395_thumb.jpg

post-80153-0-02362300-1492086395_thumb.jpg

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Pres    896

Ron, to me that is definitely an outie. The lid fits outside of the rim of the pot resting on the shoulder.

 

 

What? I fire all of my lids on the pots. Over the years I have found that this ensures proper lid fit in the finished product. I do wonder about firing them separately, but find that I like the look of the bare clay in contrast to the glaze areas. As for feel, I put toothpaste between two edges like lids and turn the pieces to ground them smoother. Makes them move without the rough feel. If I were firing porcelain, it would probably be a different story.

 

 

best,

Pres

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Innies all the way! 1 and 3 are innies, and they're the only kinds I make. I don't like cap lids. Just a preference. I like the little "plink" sound of dropping a lid into a gallery. I will add a flange to a gallery lid for a teapot for the counterweight, and for a French butter dish because it's not a French butter dish without one.

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Min    783

Few more styles of lids. my go to lid for jars is #2, reason being is that I don't like seeing a stark white line of clay on the top of the pot when the lid is on, I like having the lid cover the unglazed rim of the pot. I make all lids the same size for each type of pot plus make a couple extra. Ron, if you make lid style #2 angle the bit that goes into the pot like in the diagram, gives you some wiggle room for fitting the lid. Also make it a tiny bit thicker than you need it so it can be trimmed if necessary. For teapots I like #9. Making the lid from the same batch of clay as the pot and throwing the lid a fraction bigger than you need since they are fast to throw and seem to shrink a tiny bit more than the base, more so the wider the lid gets like for a casserole (#3 lid for me) . I always fire lids in place. A little silicon carbide mixed with toothpaste used as a grinding compound will make the touching unglazed parts silky smooth plus help with any sticky parts if a lid fits too tightly.

2434d97f197652c5fd2a1e2d8ca53bae.jpg

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Pres    896

Thanks for the addition Min. I think folks will get some insight from these.

 

bet,

Pres

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RonSa    189

Thanks Mea

 

#9 is the type of lid I've been making for jars and my first teapot that I just finished. I meant to make a longer flange like the one shown but I miscalculated so next time I'll get it right. 

 

What grit size would you recommend for the silicon carbide?

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Mark C.    1,807

#1 is what I make most of the time-cannisters-cookie jars -casseroles-innies as Pres said.

#7 is what I call a flanged lid-usually the pot walls are more straight up vertical than this example

#9 is what 99% of all my teapots are.

 

What-back in the 80's I came to make all the same forms the same size to simplify lids making

Butter dishes are 17cm

honey pots 10 cm

 

That way if you need a lid you know the size. I write this on a card pinned to the wall-still there 35 years later.

I fire ALL lids in the pots-if bisquing I flip them over in pot to same vertical space. In glaze fire always upright in pot.

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Pres    896

Like Mark,

I too fire my lids upside down on  most of the pots, saves space and handles. . .sometimes I can be a little reckless. However, when I throw honey jars I fire them upright as I have a second piece that goes down in to the jar to form a spoon for the honey with a drizzle hole in it. I also make all of the teapot lids the same dimension. . saves a lot of time, and if one lid breaks, another works.

 

best,

Pres

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Mark C.    1,807

Heres some old work with the different style lids

The first is an innie like most of my canisters and cookie jars are today. You can trim these easy to fit before throwing the lifters

the second in a rarer flanged teapot lid

The 3rd is an old typical teapot lid-I still have this pot

The 4th is an English stye teapot salt glazed 

The last is a innie lid soup Tureen-back when people bought these (out of style now)

 

 

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post-8914-0-97947100-1492120137_thumb.jpg

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Min    783

 

 

What grit size would you recommend for the silicon carbide?

 

I use 100 mesh but that's just because that's what I have. If you can find water based valve grinding compound at your local automotive supply place that works too. Could only find the oil based stuff here so made my own with toothpaste and silicon carbide. (leaves your pots minty fresh too ; )

I've posted this picture before but it shows how much I smear on, doesn't take much.

post-747-0-84013000-1492121484_thumb.jpg

post-747-0-84013000-1492121484_thumb.jpg

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RonSa    189

 

 

 

What grit size would you recommend for the silicon carbide?

 

I use 100 mesh but that's just because that's what I have. If you can find water based valve grinding compound at your local automotive supply place that works too. Could only find the oil based stuff here so made my own with toothpaste and silicon carbide. (leaves your pots minty fresh too ; )

I've posted this picture before but it shows how much I smear on, doesn't take much.

 

 

I was thinking I might be able to use rubbing compound (tripoli) but that's closer to 800 mesh, way to fine. Value grinding compound is easy to find, thanks

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Mark C.    1,807

Heres yesterdays load and you can see french butterdishes and canisters and regular butterdish lids-innis and outies

post-8914-0-42959800-1492125021_thumb.jpg

post-8914-0-42959800-1492125021_thumb.jpg

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RonSa    189

Heres yesterdays load and you can see french butterfishes and canisters and regular butterfish lids-innis and outies

 

 

Thanks Mark but butterfish never agreed with me. :)

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Mark C.    1,807

 

Heres yesterdays load and you can see french butterfishes and canisters and regular butterfish lids-innis and outies

 

 

Thanks Mark but butterfish never agreed with me. :)

 

Its my auto spelling on my new Mac-I'll fix that

You know butterfish are good eating with the high fat content

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Pres    896

Dang, and I thought I was going to learn about a new form! <_<

 

best,

Pres

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RonSa    189

 

 

Heres yesterdays load and you can see french butterfishes and canisters and regular butterfish lids-innis and outies

 

 

Thanks Mark but butterfish never agreed with me. :)

 

Its my auto spelling on my new Mac-I'll fix that

You know butterfish are good eating with the high fat content

 

 

Yes I know its good eating, I thought you had dinner on your mind.

 

It may not have been your spell checker, you just needed to move your finger a little to the left.

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Pres    896

Finishing up two more burial urns. These have one lid that is an innie, where I put the Name, Dates, etc. The next lid protects the innie, and is an outie as in a ginger jar. Glue/caulk the inner lid, put on the outer and bury in a vault for urns.

 

best,

Pres

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Pres    896

An interesting link for those of you doing burial urns. . . utility that allows you to put in the weight of the individual, and get and equivalent in ash volume in cubic inches or in cups of liquid. Pretty handy for those of you doing them for animals, people etc. 

 

http://www.mainelyurns.com/what-size-cremation-urn.html

 

best,

Pres

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RonSa    189

Not really, the cremains from a 5'10" 350lb adult will yield the same amount of ashes as a 5'10" 150lb adult. That is because the ashes are only from the skeleton.

 

Figure about 200-220 cubic inches for an adult.

The standard urn for an adult is about 6"W X 4" d X 8"H (final inside dimensions)

 

Ask any funeral director for confirmation.

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Pres    896

Oh well, just passing on what I found on the internet. My bad,

best,

Pres

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RonSa    189

You are in good company since you are not the only one to fall for this. Its a common problem in woodturning circles that comes up all to frequently.

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