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What Type Of Sand? To Add To Clay.


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#1 Joseph F

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 07:56 PM

I am going to start wedging sand into some of my clay for some vase I plan on designing to sell to local places.

I did some Google searching but most places just said find 100% Silica sand. But I am not sure how accurate that is for electrical kilns.

I assume you just can't use any sand as I assume it could be ocean sand and have salt residual in it and be bad for elements?

Is there a brand that is trusted? Or what do I ask for? Any tips?

#2 JBaymore

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 08:45 PM

A lot of sands are actually made up of weathered feldspar, granite, and the like.  Some contain weathered shells (as in calcium carbonate). 

 

Normal IS silica sand.  Coarsely weathered silica (flint/quartz).

 

At cone 9 range.... many sands that are NOT silica sand..... melt.  SOme with calcium carb tend to outgas...and casue "issues" or many sorts.  Calcium oxide (what calcium carb turns into... is a flux on silica.  SO a "melting agent".

 

The best answer is ............ test, test, test.

 

And remember that non ceramic sands are not tested for consistency for what you are doing with it.  So what is fine for other uses as far as variance goes....... may come back and bite you in the butt.

 

best,

 

.....................john


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#3 Joseph F

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 08:49 PM

Bite in butt is what I am worrying about. I might put this on the back burner then until I have more time to spend months testing.

Thanks for quick reply.

#4 Joseph F

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 09:22 PM

I think I'm just going to take my bone dry trimmings and wedge them into my wet clay. Or take my trimmings in a bucket and wet them to a muddy grout type feeling and add it to my thrown forms. This will do for now until I can fool around with more sand.

#5 Mark C.

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 10:09 PM

Laguna/Axner sells ceramic sand-I think its in 100# bags dirt cheap. I have a bag-not sure if I have opened it?I'll look .


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#6 Magnolia Mud Research

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 10:42 PM

calcine the sand you plan to use and see what happens. 

Mix a little with your clay body and see what happens. 

 

I use sand-box sand from Lowes in cone 10 reduction as part of a clay-sand texture slip, and it does not induce significant melting of the clay.

 

LT



#7 glazenerd

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 11:26 PM

Take you bisq rejects and hammer them into grog: throw it back in.

Nerd



#8 JBaymore

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 05:54 AM

 

 

I use sand-box sand from Lowes in cone 10 reduction as part of a clay-sand texture slip, and it does not induce significant melting of the clay.

 

With students doing testing over the years.... we've found that Lowes / Home Depot / Toys Are Us sand from different lots from the same stores is different in how it behaves.  And different parts of the country appear to be different also. 

 

best,

 

..................john


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Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

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http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#9 curt

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 06:36 AM

Where I am at silica sand in various (usually coarser) sizes can be purchased from industrial minerals suppliers, quarries, etc. designed and graded for use in construction, light manufacturing. They usually can supply a spec sheet listing oxide breakdown, impurities, etc..

#10 Joseph F

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 06:57 AM

Wow thanks everyone for all the awesome responses.

#11 neilestrick

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 07:50 AM

Don't over think this. Just get silica sand from your raw materials supplier, probably the same place you get your clay. It's cheap and it will work. You just need to decide what mesh to use. For throwing bodies I like 70 mesh. If you want something gritty you could go as large as 20 or 30 mesh.


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#12 Magnolia Mud Research

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 10:57 AM

The main point is that you should select your sand source wisely just as you select your sources for clay and other ingredients.  Variations within a single bag is not very likely, but expect some differences from today's bag compared to the one bought two years ago.  Test the sand to see if it meets your requirements, if it meets them OK, then use it.   

 

The sand I use I expect to surprise me, that is why I add it as surface decoration.   The same with local clay and dirt deposits.  I expect the next bucket to be different from last years bucket.   

 

LT



#13 fergusonjeff

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 09:05 AM

I use white silica sand from local home improvement stores (Lowes, Home Depot, Menards).  It is sold near the cement, but I think it is also used a filter in some water treatments.  It runs about $5 for 50 pound bags.  I add a few pounds of sand and a few pounds of fireclay to every pugmill load (~35 pounds) of cone 6 clay to reduce warping.  Has made a big difference. 

The silica sand is usually a 20-50 mesh size.  I used the same sand in the mortar mix for a wood-fire kiln.  Playground sand would make me a little worried since it can vary a lot more.



#14 Joseph F

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 09:28 AM

I am just going to have to try it. I am wanting to make the surfaces of taller vases more natural in appearance.



#15 perkolator

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:53 PM

I started getting silica sand from my local Industrial Mineral supplier to replace expensive grog in my kiln wadding -- turns out it's the exact same 100# bag of sand that is sold in my local Home Depot in the masonry section.  

It is NOT "playground sand" it is 100% Silica Sand



#16 Joseph F

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:59 PM

I am going to check out Home Depot soon. I am trying all sorts of things to vary my surfaces in electric firings. 

 

Thanks for all the help. 100% silica sand at home depot sounds right up my ally.



#17 alabama

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 10:07 PM

There was in the 18th century up north a type of crock called coarse-ware and it was wheel throw with sand in it. Any sand that is the same size is probably what you're looking for. A couple of weeks ago I bought some "course sand" from the local sand and gravel company..its mixed with the larger particles a little larger than rice! Its for hand building! Do more experiments and let us know the results!!! :)

#18 JBaymore

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:36 AM

Not finding "silica sand" here in Lowes/ Home Depot in the New England area.

 

best,

 

..............john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#19 Joseph F

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 01:24 PM

I will report back if I find some. I will also report back my findings. I haven't checked Home Depot yet. I have just been enjoying myself throwing as tall as I can then cutting it in half. I kept a few nice things. I can only keep a pot around 18'' tall because that is as big as my kiln will allow once it shrinks it will fit! 

 

Really enjoying the process of throwing tall. Can't wait to add sand into the mix for some beautiful texture.



#20 fergusonjeff

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 03:18 PM

I am not sure if I can post a link or not, but I will try.  It might be easier to find as "industrial quartz".  Here is the silica sand I find on Home depot's web site.  The stuff I have bought is the same, but in 75 pound bags.  Menards has the same thing in a 20-50 mesh size in a 50 pound bag.

 

http://www.homedepot...-4095/202080636

 

https://www.menards....525121588110161






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