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AndreaB

Getting Underglaze Onto Greenware With Brush Strokes

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Hi peps,

 

I have an unfired stoneware planter that needs to be decorated. However my painting skills leave much to be desired. Because I don't have any spraying tools I will have to rely on using brushes. 

 

How can I achieve an even coat?

 

post-65376-0-45906600-1491648570_thumb.jpg

post-65376-0-45906600-1491648570_thumb.jpg

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I can't say too many nice things about sumi brushes when it comes to painting on glaze. They're designed for Japanese ink painting. They have very soft bristles that leave no brushstrokes and hold a lot of glaze without having to redip in the jar too often.

I've had my big flat Hake brush for at least 20 years. The bristles have worn down but are not falling out. Like other Asian bamboo handle brushes of this ilk, they're designed to hold a ton of watery ink and to achieve an even flow of liquid over a thirsty surface (rice paper, etc) which they do really well.

I have a smaller more typical 'round' bamboo sumi brush that I use for almost all my small ceramic jewelry work, it also holds a lot of glaze without having to redip it often and leaves virtually no brushstrokes. The tip forms a fine point for detail.

I've not really been able to tell, on my small pieces at least, what I've dipped and what I've brushed as long as I use the sumi brushes.

Do a web search on sumi brushes would be my advice.

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Use thin underglaze, several thin coats rather than one thick one. Apply with a wide flat brush. Can you put it on your wheel and turn v slowly, or a banding wheel? You can always gently rub down any over thick bits with a fine grain sanding sponge or sandpaper before bisque firing. Good luck.

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To add to what previous posters have said, keep in mind that underglazes can be diluted with water, much like paints. To get an even coat, I will often dip my brush in water to smooth each coat, after applying. This can also be done to blend colors, when creating a gradient.

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]The final product. I'm very happy with the result. Unfortunately I must have hit the rim of the pot loading into the kiln because there is a crack.  I am a bit disappointed with the fading of the leaves, but then it leaves a subtle image. I'll know better next time.

 

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oldlady, Sputty and GEP like this

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Thanks so much for following up and showing us a picture of your outcome.  It is quite lovely. By the way, the crack on the rim might not be because you bumped it.  The cause could be things like uneven drying, or stresses during forming.

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