Jump to content
Fredrin

Us To Uk Frit Substitution Chart?

Recommended Posts

Apologies if this topic has been raised many times before.

 

Just wondering if there is such a thing out there as a substitution chart for UK/European potters who encounter American brands of frit.

 

I have found this one at ceramics today, which is helpful for Silica/Alumina Ratio, Molecular Formula and Percentage Analysis, but it would be ideal if there was one that specified particular UK brands such as Potclays, Potterycrafts etc as an alternative to the Ferro frits.

 

Can anyone lend any advice on this? I am excitedly reading through John Britt's Mid-Range Glazes book but a little dismayed that almost all the recipes contain US frits!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Standard Borax Frit is pretty much a straight swap for Ferro Frit 3124, 3134 is pretty close too and would probably be ok with a straight swap.

 

Frit 3195 could probably be made up from half the amount of calcium borate frit and extra silica to match.

 

Thanks Joel.

 

Yes, I see that most of these recipes use Frit 3110, 3124, 3134 and 3195, so good to know that these are easily replaceable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The naming on pottery crafts website is strange, I am sure they have the same frits but they are calling standard borax frit "Borax (E)"

 

I have always found http://www.ctmpotterssupplies.co.uk/rawmaterialsone.html the cheapest for raw materials even adding the 20% vat not in their prices. 

 

When I have a little time I will work out a match for the exact chemistry but I think they are close enough to swap in and out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scarva in Northern Ireland sell a selection of Ferro Frits that they describe as American.

I can testify that their delivery service to mainland UK is excellent.

Sally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the best I can do to match chemistry, doesn't mean they will melt exactly the same as the right frit but could be a start. Hard to get enough sodium in and always too much alumina or calcium. They use a lot of soda ash while making frits I think. Don't know how usable it is for a glaze material as it's soluble. 3110 was pretty much impossible to replicate.

 

gallery_23281_1027_102841.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the best I can do to match chemistry, doesn't mean they will melt exactly the same as the right frit but could be a start. Hard to get enough sodium in and always too much alumina or calcium. They use a lot of soda ash while making frits I think. Don't know how usable it is for a glaze material as it's soluble. 3110 was pretty much impossible to replicate.

 

gallery_23281_1027_102841.png

 

Thanks again, Joe. Looks like you got pretty close with 3124 and 3195 there. Will give those a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2017 at 11:31 PM, Fredrin said:

 

Thanks again, Joe. Looks like you got pretty close with 3124 and 3195 there. Will give those a try.

Hello Fredrin, did you gave it a try? Do the substitutions work for 3134 and 3195? Best, Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.