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LinR

How Did They Do That?

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The Blackfish Gallery in Portland in conjunction with NCECA had an excellent exhibit of wood and soda fired pots.  There was a series of small bowls which had been fired upside down, one on top of the other with the lovely wadding mark in the centre of the bowl.  The wadding roughness had been ground off.  As a learning soda/wood fire student I thought the inside of the bowl seemed to be glazed rather than coated with flashing slip.  The surface was smooth and juicy.  I would have thought that putting wadding on a glaze would have left it well and truly stuck and that it would be difficult to sand it down sufficiently to be functional on the inside of a bowl.  Can someone explain what might have been done?  Lin

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Guest JBaymore

Was the inside a shino?  If so, very common technique.

 

A lot of post-firing work is done on many woodfire pots.  Usually with diamond surfaces tools.  Working from coarse to fine grits.  If you do it well......... it is quite functional.  It takes time to do this stuff though.

 

Most woodfirers routinely sand the surfaces of a lot of the pieces with 200, 400, and 600 grit wet/dry silicon carbine paper as a general step in the finishing process.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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Randy Johnston does the inverted firing . . . http://www.mckeachiejohnstonstudios.com/gallery.shtml?0001#all

 

You can add oxides to your wadding to help flash where it makes contact with the ware. What you are likely seeing is a non-glazed interior, with just the wood ash and soda doing its thing on the surface.

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Apologies for not thanking you for your input.  Cyberspace ate my password and I've been trying to get access back in between workshops and preparing for a sale. All seems well now thanks to Jennifer.

I assumed that the bowls had a glaze on them because the inside surface was so juicy and there were drips on the edges of the bowls, facing up of course.

Would a shino glaze release the wadding more easily than others?

Thanks again for your comments.

Lin

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