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Looking To Start Mixing My Own Glazes


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#41 RonSa

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:14 AM

I'll be adding Zicropax, Talc and 80 mesh test and full size sieves to my list.

 

I do like it when the glaze breaks as GEP mentioned but there will be times when I won't what that to happen so I'll get both zicropax and tin oxide.

 

I've noticed, and I'm sure everyone already knows, that recipes never include how much water to add or even the specific gravity. I thinking all this depends on how I apply the glaze and its better to start with less and add more water as I go. Right now I'm pouring and brushing and I want to get away from brushing and start spraying or dipping.

 

So my guess is if I have 100 grams of dry glaze materials I might start with 50mL of water and go from there. Is this sound or is there a better way?


Ron


#42 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:21 AM

I generally start with 2/3 the weight of water. So if I am making a 5kg batch of glaze I will chuck 3-3.5 jugs (1000ml) of water in the bucket first, add dry and mix up then measure SG the next day and add water as needed.

 

I find 2/3 weight will get you to about a custard consistency 


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

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#43 RonSa

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:37 AM

Thanks Joel


Ron


#44 glazenerd

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:48 AM

Ron:

You will find that the amount of water required from recipe to recipe varies little. The exception to that rule is when clay/s or bentonite, or gums are added. Ball clay/s, bentonite, and gums absorb up to four times their weight in water.

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#45 Joseph F

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 02:03 PM

Ayjay

It's a glaze that has a lot of iron in it. So it turns a creamy white with breaks of brown. If you lower the tin it turns more brown.

#46 Joe_L

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:51 PM

All I can say is what a timely post and what a lot of useful info as I'm going to be starting on this road sometime soon.#

Joe



#47 oldlady

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:47 PM

joe, when you start spraying glaze, do not thin the glaze too much.  if you are going to start single firing, you will find that the glaze dries instantly when applied to dry greenware.  that is a big plus for single firing.  if you use your sprayer on ** BISQUE** it will take a little while to dry but it will work.

 

(many of my glazes are milkshake thickness and they work very well like that.)

 

SORRY, TOO LONG A DAY. SO I EDITED IT.


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#48 RonSa

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 08:31 AM

Lithium Carbonate and Spodumene seem similar, should I still get both?


Ron


#49 Callie Beller Diesel

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 03:25 PM

Pull them up next to each other in Insight. You can do that with individual materials in order to compare them. Lithium Carbonate will only supply lithium to the glaze, while spodumene is a mineral, and will supply other things as well.

Also, you can have a look at the Digitalfire Materials database on their website. The two are written by Tony Hanson, so the two resources are meant to go together. His tutorial videos are a bit like listening to paint dry, but if you follow along with exercises that he does in your own program, I find them to be quite helpful.

And on the whole opacifier thing, I'm currently experimenting with a combination of opacifiers (tin, zircopax and titanium), because I am one of those people who can tell the difference between 9 different white paint chips, and I'm picky. The clay body beneath any glaze really does heavily influence the outcome heavily, but the effects are usually first noticed in a clear and a white glaze.

#50 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 04:59 PM

I have never used lithium carb, easy to get enough in there with spodumene/petalite.


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#51 RonSa

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 05:01 PM

Thanks Callie I didn't know I could do that in Insight.  I'm still finding my way around the program.

 

And Yes, there are blue whites, yellow white, cream whites and so on.

 

Thanks Joel, I was hoping that was the case


Ron


#52 Joseph F

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 08:57 PM

Finding a perfect white is like an eternal quest. I am still searching. Getting closer though.



#53 glazenerd

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 09:05 PM

Perhaps those who are looking for the perfect white should consider yttrium oxide. Yes, it is $30 a lb, but given the price of tin ox and the amount required it should be considered. Yttrium gives a nice warm white at 2-3%.

 

Nerd

 

Ron: let me give you some insight. On Insight, enter 1 gram of lithium carb, then 1 gram of spodumene, and then 1 gram of petalite. Notice the difference in weight / molarity; it will give you a frame of reference about potency. You can also do that with all the feldspars- will give you a comparative frame of reference. One of the big issues with mixing your own glazes is learning the material database.



#54 NancyAmores

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 01:28 AM

Here's an article from CAD that has recipes that look a lot like the Coyote Shinos, haven't yet tried them but they look nice. Good luck, can't wait to see what glazes you try first!



#55 Roberta12

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 08:56 AM

Here's an article from CAD that has recipes that look a lot like the Coyote Shinos, haven't yet tried them but they look nice. Good luck, can't wait to see what glazes you try first!

Thanks for the link Nancy, I was going to share that also!  I mixed up several batches of that "shino" a couple of years ago.  One batch had copper carb in it for a nice soft green that broke brown where it was thinner.  I think I did 4%  copper carb.  And yes, it does look almost like the Coyote "shino".  It's a very durable, stable, glaze. 

 

Roberta



#56 RonSa

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 09:35 AM

Thanks Nancy

 

Tom,

I never heard of yttrium oxide and had a hard time finding it until I came it on Ebay.

Thanks for the insight on Insight


Ron


#57 glazenerd

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 03:30 PM

Ron:

 

You want to play with Yttirum ox... send me an address in PM and I will send you a small sample. I am a Nerd, we keep these kind of things around ya know.

 

Nerd



#58 RonSa

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 03:43 PM

Thanks Tom


Ron


#59 njabeid

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 05:18 PM

Make sure the lithium carbonate is finely ground. I am also learning to make glazes, and my first purchase turned out to be as coarse as salt or sugar. It made interesting shiny dots in the satin glaze, but now I have the finer particle size the glaze works better.

 

For fun you should try a bit of Strontium carbonate. It gives a sumptuous satin surface and good colour response.



#60 RonSa

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 04:03 PM

Finally, I have my order placed.

 

Rant On:

I've placed larger orders with 1/100th the problem as I had with this order. I had to go through 3 different suppliers before I could find one willing to ship to me. This is after the first two saying no problem, "Yes, we can ship this" and then only after I called wondering about the delivery date I was informed they can't.

 

My credit cards are good so that is not the problem.

:Rant Over

 

Is this a normal thing with ceramic suppliers? They seem to be the most unprofessional group I have ever had to deal with.

:Now its really over, thanks for listening.


Ron





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