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Looking To Start Mixing My Own Glazes


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#21 Roberta12

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 04:54 PM

Joseph F, thank you so much for posting that clip from Steve Loucks.  I was sitting behind the tallest man in the world and could not see the screen at all.  Afterward I searched to see if Steve had written a book, but alas, no.  I didn't even think about looking for the youtube video! 

 

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#22 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 04:59 PM

So here's my list as of now, any additions or deletions?

 

Nepphiline Syenite
FeldSpar Potash/ Mavhair #63
Silica 325
Frits 3134 and 3124
EPK
Dolomite

Lithium carb
Gerstley borate
Alumina Hydrate
Bentonite
Whiting
Wollastonite

Copper carbonate
cobalt oxide
red iron oxide
Rutile
Tin Oxide

I need:
Sieves (three different sizes where mentioned here on this thread)
A way to improve the ventilation


I have:
Scales
P100 respirators
1, 2 & 5 gallon buckets
Glove and googles (not sure if I need them)

 

If you're buying frits i'm not sure you need gerstley borate too. I like a 120 mesh but it does take a lot longer than 80 mesh. 


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#23 RonSa

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 05:49 PM

Thanks Joseph for the video and pdf

 

Joel, I had a feeling I could use one or the other, thanks.


Ron


#24 Min

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 06:13 PM

I would add Minspar (kinda have to say that given my nickname) plus maybe add zircopax. Cobalt oxide will give you specks in the glaze, if you don't want specks go with cobalt carbonate. Careful on the rutile you buy, there are different grades of that, I like the fine ceramic grade (you can use titanium dioxide if the rutile you get leaves a muddy colour to your glazes). Gerstley is cheap and some recipes are difficult to adjust with frits to get enough boron into them, I would get a bit of that plus the frits. For the bentonite, since you will be making clear glazes go for the white bentonite, I think it's sometimes called Volclay? can get specks from the regular grade of bentonite. Yes, on the gloves, good idea to wear them when working with glazes. We all have our preferences for screen size, I like 80 mesh, doesn't take long to run a glaze through that size. If you already have kiln wash you could leave the alumina hydrate, since you are not working with porcelain you won't need that for adding to wax resist in pot galleries and alumina in the glaze is easy to get with the epk. Your P100 is a fitting mask/respirator and not one of those paper disposable ones right? Holy cow, this sounds way more complicated than it should, hope you can muddle through all this  :wacko:



#25 glazenerd

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 06:20 PM

That list works for me... Nerd



#26 RonSa

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 06:23 PM

Yes, my p100 is a proper fitting mask and not one of those paper ones that make you think you are doing the right thing, Thanks for asking.


Ron


#27 Joseph F

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 07:31 PM

What about zircopax? Unless you plan on only using Tin for white glazes? Which is pretty expensive and usually not worth it unless your wanting a softer white.



#28 GEP

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:12 PM

What about zircopax? Unless you plan on only using Tin for white glazes? Which is pretty expensive and usually not worth it unless your wanting a softer white.


To each their own, and different recipes will yield different results too, but I've tried subbing Zircopax for Tin Ox a few times, and have never liked it. Zircopax glazes don't break on edges and textures. I'll gladly pay $30/pound for Tin. Tin breaks on edges, makes a brighter white, and has more subtle variation throughout.
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#29 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:23 PM

I find tin is a lot like rutile and it makes these swirls of different glass, zicropax is flat.

 

Min your are right about the ferro frits 3134 3124, I am used to using one that's 50% B2O3. There seems to be a lot of choice anyway while I had a look on digital fire under ferro frit.

 

I also happened to notice the company I get materials from sell a high alkaline frit and have missed off 7%~ BaO in the description. Selling it under 'good for crackle glazes' That doesn't seem right.


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#30 Joseph F

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:23 PM

 

What about zircopax? Unless you plan on only using Tin for white glazes? Which is pretty expensive and usually not worth it unless your wanting a softer white.


To each their own, and different recipes will yield different results too, but I've tried subbing Zircopax for Tin Ox a few times, and have never liked it. Zircopax glazes don't break on edges and textures. I'll gladly pay $30/pound for Tin. Tin breaks on edges, makes a brighter white, and has more subtle variation throughout.

 

 

I am not disagreeing with you at all. I have a 5 gallon bucket with a glaze that has 12% Tin Oxide in it. I use it all the time its my liner glaze for most of my pots. However not having any zircopax at all seems like a lot of Tin Oxide being used for glazes where zircopax could be used instead. Doesn't Zircopax stiffen the melt? I am pretty sure I read that somewhere(could be way off).

 

One thing I don't like about zircopax compared to tin is the color of high zircopax recipes reminds me of sinks and toilets. I rarely use it over 5%. 



#31 GEP

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:33 PM

The way I see it, I spent only $300 on glaze materials last year. $150 of that was for Tin Ox. Making one's own glazes is still really cheap, even when Tin is involved.

Anytime I held a Tin glaze test next to a Zircopax test, the Zircopax glaze looked like flat muddy yellow.
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#32 RonSa

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 07:24 AM

I setup an account with Digitalfire and downloaded and installed Insight (level 2) and it looks like the XML file that contains recipes are no longer available. :(

 

 

I know water is a big component in glaze recipes and I have access to three different sources (all well water):

  1) hard tap water that has a lot of calcium

  2) hard tap water that has been soften using salt. According to the manufacture there is less salt in 8oz of water then there is in a slice of regular white bread.

  3) tap water that has an iron content - according to the lab were I get it tested and it is potable (although I have this strange attraction to magnets  :rolleyes: )

 

My guess is #1 would be the best?


Ron


#33 glazenerd

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 08:14 AM

#1..calcium is good for the bones and glazes.  The concentration levels (PPM) is not high enough to have overly noticeable effects.



#34 RonSa

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 10:47 AM

I setup an account with Digitalfire and downloaded and installed Insight (level 2) and it looks like the XML file that contains recipes are no longer available. :(

 

My error, it never came with the recipe XML file, I just needed a chance for my coffee to kick in.


Ron


#35 oldlady

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 11:20 AM

ron, the cost of a few gallons of distilled water is less than a dollar a gallon.  even if you move, that will be the same every time.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#36 RonSa

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 01:37 PM

LOL, I had considered that as option #4 but I thought it might be considered a bit obsessive.


Ron


#37 Min

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 04:37 PM


 

 

 

To each their own, and different recipes will yield different results too, but I've tried subbing Zircopax for Tin Ox a few times, and have never liked it. Zircopax glazes don't break on edges and textures. I'll gladly pay $30/pound for Tin. Tin breaks on edges, makes a brighter white, and has more subtle variation throughout.

 

 

US Pigments still has it on sale for 22/lb, I just got 5 lbs, was $6- for shipping (to the US)

 

https://uspigment.co...estannic-oxide/



#38 GEP

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 07:30 PM

To each their own, and different recipes will yield different results too, but I've tried subbing Zircopax for Tin Ox a few times, and have never liked it. Zircopax glazes don't break on edges and textures. I'll gladly pay $30/pound for Tin. Tin breaks on edges, makes a brighter white, and has more subtle variation throughout.

 
US Pigments still has it on sale for 22/lb, I just got 5 lbs, was $6- for shipping (to the US)
 
https://uspigment.co...estannic-oxide/

Thanks Min. I once bought $22/pound Tin Oxide from Highwater. I'm guessing it's the same stuff sold at US Pigment. It was years ago so I don't remember exactly what was different, but it was different from the one my local supplier carries (Baltimore Clayworks). I'm not not saying it was worse, just that it was different. For the sake of consistency and pickiness, I decided to keep buying it locally.
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#39 Mark C.

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 08:10 PM

80 mesh screen is all thats needed

electronic scale-under 30$ on amazon will do fine


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#40 ayjay

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 06:13 AM

 

I am not disagreeing with you at all. I have a 5 gallon bucket with a glaze that has 12% Tin Oxide in it. I use it all the time its my liner glaze for most of my pots.

 

Does using 12% do something other than make a simple white liner glaze?

 

I use 4% Tin Oxide added to my clear liner and it makes a perfect white liner glaze.






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