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RonSa

Looking To Start Mixing My Own Glazes

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RonSa    189

Thanks Callie I didn't know I could do that in Insight.  I'm still finding my way around the program.

 

And Yes, there are blue whites, yellow white, cream whites and so on.

 

Thanks Joel, I was hoping that was the case

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Joseph F    865

Finding a perfect white is like an eternal quest. I am still searching. Getting closer though.

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glazenerd    816

Perhaps those who are looking for the perfect white should consider yttrium oxide. Yes, it is $30 a lb, but given the price of tin ox and the amount required it should be considered. Yttrium gives a nice warm white at 2-3%.

 

Nerd

 

Ron: let me give you some insight. On Insight, enter 1 gram of lithium carb, then 1 gram of spodumene, and then 1 gram of petalite. Notice the difference in weight / molarity; it will give you a frame of reference about potency. You can also do that with all the feldspars- will give you a comparative frame of reference. One of the big issues with mixing your own glazes is learning the material database.

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Roberta12    135

Here's an article from CAD that has recipes that look a lot like the Coyote Shinos, haven't yet tried them but they look nice. Good luck, can't wait to see what glazes you try first!

Thanks for the link Nancy, I was going to share that also!  I mixed up several batches of that "shino" a couple of years ago.  One batch had copper carb in it for a nice soft green that broke brown where it was thinner.  I think I did 4%  copper carb.  And yes, it does look almost like the Coyote "shino".  It's a very durable, stable, glaze. 

 

Roberta

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RonSa    189

Thanks Nancy

 

Tom,

I never heard of yttrium oxide and had a hard time finding it until I came it on Ebay.

Thanks for the insight on Insight

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glazenerd    816

Ron:

 

You want to play with Yttirum ox... send me an address in PM and I will send you a small sample. I am a Nerd, we keep these kind of things around ya know.

 

Nerd

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njabeid    5

Make sure the lithium carbonate is finely ground. I am also learning to make glazes, and my first purchase turned out to be as coarse as salt or sugar. It made interesting shiny dots in the satin glaze, but now I have the finer particle size the glaze works better.

 

For fun you should try a bit of Strontium carbonate. It gives a sumptuous satin surface and good colour response.

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RonSa    189

Finally, I have my order placed.

 

Rant On:

I've placed larger orders with 1/100th the problem as I had with this order. I had to go through 3 different suppliers before I could find one willing to ship to me. This is after the first two saying no problem, "Yes, we can ship this" and then only after I called wondering about the delivery date I was informed they can't.

 

My credit cards are good so that is not the problem.

:Rant Over

 

Is this a normal thing with ceramic suppliers? They seem to be the most unprofessional group I have ever had to deal with.

:Now its really over, thanks for listening.

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Joseph F    865

Who did u order from? What country are you in. I personally use US pigment for most of my orders.

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RonSa    189

PM sent

 

I just looked at US pigment, I wish I had known about them sooner. Thanks for the heads up

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curt    117

Finally, I have my order placed.

 

Rant On:

I've placed larger orders with 1/100th the problem as I had with this order. I had to go through 3 different suppliers before I could find one willing to ship to me. This is after the first two saying no problem, "Yes, we can ship this" and then only after I called wondering about the delivery date I was informed they can't.

 

My credit cards are good so that is not the problem.

:Rant Over

 

Is this a normal thing with ceramic suppliers? They seem to be the most unprofessional group I have ever had to deal with.

:Now its really over, thanks for listening.

Yes I think it is. Or at least my experience has not been good in this area.

 

And if you want see how bad it can really get try dealing with them from overseas.

 

Wondering if there is a Yelp or similar site for customer ratings of the service quality, etc.. of various ceramic suppliers (globally). Possibly off topic here so mods please feel free to redirect or move to another post if appropriate.

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RonSa    189

My dry materials finally arrived. Next up, time to start testing.

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Joseph F    865

My dry materials finally arrived. Next up, time to start testing.

 

Congrats. 

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Pres    896

My glazes can (for the most part) be made with this shopping list I used to start my studio with.

 

Silica 2 bag

China Clay (EPK) 2 bag

Ball Clay (OM4) 1 bag

Potash Feldspar 2 bag

Neph Sy 1 bag

Talc 1 bag

Whiting 1 bag

Wollastonite 1 bag

G. Borate 1 bag

Dolomite 10 kg

Frit 3124 5 kg

Frit 3134 1 bag

Frit 3195 5 kg

Frit 4110      

Tin Oxide 2 kg

Cobalt Oxide 250 g

Cobalt Carbonate 2 kg

Titaninium Dioxide 5 kg

Copper Carbonate 5 kg

Chromium Oxide 2 kg

Red Iron Oxide 1 bag

Rutile 5 kg

Manganese Dioxide 1 kg

Zinc Oxide 5 kg

Zicropax 5 kg

Bentonite 1 kg

 

The quantity ordered somewhat reflects how often the materials are used.

I would up the 3124 to a full bag. I have found that the two frits 3124 and 3134 are the ones I use the most of.

 

best,

Pres

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Mark C.    1,800

I have rarely ever ordered dry materials online except for US pigments which seem to work fine-never an issue.

I always buy direct from suppliers-like Laguna ( my annual truck load of clay and materials) or our local ceramics shop.

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oldlady    1,323

matthew, your list seems very complete but just because the title of this thread is one newcomers will look for, i want to add a little to it. i know you have a studio for teaching and sharing with other potters.  is that why you used kg for the amounts less than a bag?  for an individual, it seems like overkill on some of them.  is that last frit 3110 and not 4110?  only a question.  and no amount listed for it. 

 

i would suggest buying C&C ball clay for whiteness. OM4 is the old standard but it is grey.  glazenerd might have a scientific reason for going to C&C but i only know i want a white ingredient when it is available. 

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RonSa    189

I just mixed my first glaze today

 

 

Cone 6 Transparent 20x5 Base Glaze

WOLLASTONITE
FRIT 3134
EPK
Silica
Minspar 200

 

Poured the mix in a graduated cylinder to 100ml and it weighs 132grams. It looks a bit watery to my inexperienced eye. The little info I've found basically says "it depends" and from what little I've read I'm seeing 100ml might come to 150-180 grams.

 

I'm I on target?

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Ron,
 
Close and on track.

 

You are correct in thinking the slurry is a little too thin.  Set it out in the sun and let the water evaporate.

I start mixing a new glaze with a measured amount of water, usually about 60 grams of water per 100 grams of dry solids.  This starting ratio gives me a glaze slurry that is intentionally 'thick'.  I can then adjust by adding measured amounts until I achieve a slurry that meets my requirements.  After I find the total water amount that gives me a good glaze slurry for the application method I will be using, that amount of water becomes part of the recipe.  I use metric ratios of water to solids because it is easier to for batch mixing.  Afterwards I also measure the specific gravity and use that number to see if water has evaporated enough to add more water to a batch for glaze that has been stored for some time. 

 

 

LT

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RonSa    189

I started with 100 grams of water, I'll cut back on that, thanks.

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Min    781

Another way is to let it sit overnight then either scoop out some of the water from the top or wick it up with a squeezed out sponge. Yes, you might loose an infinitesimally small amount of soluble stuff that might have leached out but don't think it will make an noticeable difference with this recipe. If you are used to brushing glazes then dipping glazes will seem thin by comparison. I don't use that glaze but I'm thinking your 1.5 - 1.8 is too high. I would start around 1.4 - 1.45 for a clear glaze. Maybe someone who uses that glaze will chime in here with what sg works for them. Another thing, keep your bisque temp/cone constant or sg becomes somewhat irrelevant.

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RonSa    189

Another way is to let it sit overnight then either scoop out some of the water from the top or wick it up with a squeezed out sponge.

 

You must be reading my mind, I was just looking at the glaze and noticed that its settled a bit. I was going to wait until tom morrow then siphon out the water and return it back a little at a time.

 

@ 1.40 to1.45 looks like I wasn't that far off

 

This is one you had recommended before

 

mc6g low expansion    COE 6.17

=========================================

 

  EP KAOLIN...................    22.00  

  SILICA..........................    26.00  

  WOLLASTONITE...........     4.00  

  Frit 3134.......................    29.00  

  Talc...............................    10.00  

  Custer Feldspar.............     9.00  

                              =========

                                           100.00

 

I'm thinking I could swap Custer Feldspar for Minspar?

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Min    781

 

Another way is to let it sit overnight then either scoop out some of the water from the top or wick it up with a squeezed out sponge.

 

You must be reading my mind, I was just looking at the glaze and noticed that its settled a bit. I was going to wait until tom morrow then siphon out the water and return it back a little at a time.

 

@ 1.40 to1.45 looks like I wasn't that far off

 

This is one you had recommended before

 

mc6g low expansion    COE 6.17

=========================================

 

  EP KAOLIN...................    22.00  

  SILICA..........................    26.00  

  WOLLASTONITE...........     4.00  

  Frit 3134.......................    29.00  

  Talc...............................    10.00  

  Custer Feldspar.............     9.00  

                              =========

                                           100.00

 

I'm thinking I could swap Custer Feldspar for Minspar?

 

Nope, not reading your mind, I've added too much water more than once or twice.

 

There is going to be a slight difference in the chemistry by swapping the spars but I don't think it will make a significant difference since there is only 9% in the glaze. Might lower the coe a tiny bit, I'll check it later if you like. You doing the different coe fit tests? yay if you are!

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