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removing wax


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#1 Kabe

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 10:32 PM

I'm sure that most of us have had that moment when the wax we are using to create a foot line or protect a lid edge has dripped down the side of a pot. Most the time that means that we will have to rebisk the pot and try again. The question is, could the wax be cooked off in a regular oven at about 400 degrees? The flash point for wax is just under that temperature. OR would I just be making a stinky kitchen and a mess in the oven. Sure wouldn't want the Christmas Goose to smell like burnt wax. Has any one tryed this? ain't clay fun Kabe

#2 Benhim

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 03:33 AM

I would advise against baking the pot in your kitchen oven. It would probably work, however you could achieve the same thing in your electric kiln easily. If it were not a piece I needed immediately I'd save it for my next bisque load. If I did need it I'd pop it in my kiln and try to cook it off at about 500 degrees F. Best of luck.

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#3 scoobydoozie

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 08:18 AM

Has anyone tried a propane or acetylene torch or maybe even a kitchen creme brulee torch to remove unwanted wax? Just curious... Have had the idea but haven't been brave enough to try it.

#4 Marc McMillan

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 10:27 AM

Has anyone tried a propane or acetylene torch or maybe even a kitchen creme brulee torch to remove unwanted wax? Just curious... Have had the idea but haven't been brave enough to try it.




I've tried the propane torch. It yielded black markings and/or a residual mark where the wax was. It always left an uneasy fealing about whether the glaze would stick.

Marc

#5 Humboldt Potter

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 10:36 AM

Has anyone tried a propane or acetylene torch or maybe even a kitchen creme brulee torch to remove unwanted wax? Just curious... Have had the idea but haven't been brave enough to try it.



I use a propane torch quite successfully to remove stray wax. If you are concerned about any residue after torching, just take some sandpaper and sand it off your bisqueware. Just make sure the piece is cool enough to handle, obviously.

Also, many times I can just sand off a wax droplet without using the torch or refiring. This works for small drips.
Elaine

#6 Kabe

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 10:54 PM

I would advise against baking the pot in your kitchen oven. It would probably work, however you could achieve the same thing in your electric kiln easily. If it were not a piece I needed immediately I'd save it for my next bisque load. If I did need it I'd pop it in my kiln and try to cook it off at about 500 degrees F. Best of luck.



Great advise from everyone. thank you. (I didn't even try to run this oven idea past my wife.) She is alway so logical. It has saved us both from some of my best plans. I didn't think about the fact that I could just sort of warm up the kiln. Does the commercial wax resist come of any easier? ain't clay fun! kabe

#7 Benhim

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 01:34 AM

I really like paraffin wax which is a bit of a dicey proposition as it easily catches on fire. You need to heat it to use it, but the results beat the green stuff hands down. If I am using the green stuff I dilute it down with water by about 30 - 40%. Try that with a small amount and see how you like it. My college did that to save money and I got used to using it that way instead of the "Elmers Glue" consistency it comes in from the manufacturer.

BenCo Ceramics


#8 pjens

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 03:27 PM

I went to a great raku workshop where John used a copydex (rubbery glue) instead of wax as it didn't soak into the bisque and could just be pulled cleanly off again.

#9 Paula Patton

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 05:07 PM

I use commercial wax and I have had pretty good luck using rubbing alcohol and a rag to remove unwanted wax on bisque ware. I use a q-tip to get to smaller areas. The alcohol doesn't do anything to the glaze process. You can put it in the microwave on high for a few minutes, but I'd recommend having a 'craft' microwave as it is really stinky and I would not want my food in there after that! It is always best to just re-fire the piece in another bisque firing, but I usually really need that piece! The rubbing alcohol is also good for cleanup of counter tops after waxing and I clean my brushes with it too. Hope this helps!

#10 Rakuken

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:46 AM

I'm sure that most of us have had that moment when the wax we are using to create a foot line or protect a lid edge has dripped down the side of a pot. Most the time that means that we will have to rebisk the pot and try again. The question is, could the wax be cooked off in a regular oven at about 400 degrees? The flash point for wax is just under that temperature. OR would I just be making a stinky kitchen and a mess in the oven. Sure wouldn't want the Christmas Goose to smell like burnt wax. Has any one tryed this? ain't clay fun Kabe


I use a heat gun to remove unwanted wax. The type used for stripping paint.

#11 Diana Ferreira

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 02:27 AM

thanks for the tip regarding the butane torch to get rid of unwanted wax :-) I use wax sometimes, but really hate the drip-moments.
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#12 clayboy62

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 01:26 PM

Hi Kabe,
I use a propane torch in combination with rubbing alcohol to remove the wax. Works really well.
The 99% stuff works the best. It is a bit more expensive, but it is worth it.

Brush on the alcohol over the wax spill and let it sink in. Apply a second coat and light with a torch.
Be careful as it may flare. Keep the bottle away from the flame.

Let it burn out. Sometimes the flame will not be visible so wait 30 seconds or so.

Brush on a couple more coats of alcohol. The 1st will evaporate quickly on the hot pot.

Depending on the amount and type of wax, you may have to repeat this a few times but I do it a min of 2 times.

When finished and cool, reapply the wax to the foot and glaze as normal.

#13 Mark C.

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 02:36 PM

We cook off wax all the time-usually in a hot kiln -on the bag wall
we use parafin on flat bottom forms and heat is one of the best ways to remove it
All footed forms get mobil-A sponged on the feet--you can sand it off then use a piece of broken bisque ware to rub over the the wax spot-that helps to grind off the wax and leave powder that accepts glaze
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#14 neilestrick

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:29 PM

The only thing that works to my satisfaction is re-bisque firing the pot. Everything else leaves just enough residue that it affects the glazing.
Neil Estrick
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#15 Dinah

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 08:41 PM

I agree with Neil Estrick to rebisque. I've read about using petrol to dissolve the wax, but never tried it. Sounds too niffy and fiddly for me. Can I urge folks who are using a combo of paraffin and candle wax to use a double boiler arrangement? Hotplates cost about $15, find an old sauce pan either one you've scorched or at thrift store, and fill it with water and place your wax mix in a smaller container; I "repurposed" one those small buckets containing a patio candle, warm it up each time in this water bath. I leave my brushes and foam brushes in it to cool down. For several years now and they're fine. I just don't sizzle them in HOT wax. Nice to use old favorites time and again for wax resist. Nice not to worry about fire hazard.
Dinah
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