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Tea Pots


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#21 Min

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 11:27 AM

The best way to keep tea leaves out of the cup is to position the spout higher up the body of the teapot ... that way the heavier tea leaves don't get out until the pot is nearly empty.
 

 

Think this depends on how you like your tea, I was taught to put the spout low on teapots and high on coffee. Reason being that the tea is stronger at the bottom of the pot where the leaves are, if you pour from the top of the pot you are pouring the weak tea first. Coffee pots don't have this issue so pour from the top. 


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#22 RonSa

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 12:05 PM

I guess teapots just don't look pretty there is a science behind them too.


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#23 Pres

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 04:49 PM

I had a booth at Penn State festival years ago-mid 90's. In the heat of one day a guy came up the road stopping at potter's booths. He was carrying a bucket of water. He stopped at every potter, talked to the potter and then poured water into the teapots the potter had. He did this often enough that I had plenty of warning before he got to my booth. He was very nice, we chatted a while, and he told me he was buying a teapot or two, and wanted pots that poured well felt good, and were nicely finished. He asked if he could check out my teapots, as I had about 8 on display. Each one he poured from, making comments etc. He had a crowd behind him, really creating a scene in a lot of ways on a busy Friday. After pouring and perusing, without a word he bought three-the first three he had bought that day. He emptied his bucket, packed a pot in it, and carried the others in the bag I provided. Lucky me! The rest of that day all of my tea pots were sold. Science yes, luck even better, and I check everyone I ever sell to make certain it pours well, feels good, lid stays on, and the handle works. After a while it becomes second nature. However, every time I set out to do teapots it is a new challenge as it is usually only a few months of the year I do them.

 

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#24 Joseph F

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 05:02 PM

I had a booth at Penn State festival years ago-mid 90's. In the heat of one day a guy came up the road stopping at potter's booths. He was carrying a bucket of water. He stopped at every potter, talked to the potter and then poured water into the teapots the potter had. He did this often enough that I had plenty of warning before he got to my booth. He was very nice, we chatted a while, and he told me he was buying a teapot or two, and wanted pots that poured well felt good, and were nicely finished. He asked if he could check out my teapots, as I had about 8 on display. Each one he poured from, making comments etc. He had a crowd behind him, really creating a scene in a lot of ways on a busy Friday. After pouring and perusing, without a word he bought three-the first three he had bought that day. He emptied his bucket, packed a pot in it, and carried the others in the bag I provided. Lucky me! The rest of that day all of my tea pots were sold. Science yes, luck even better, and I check everyone I ever sell to make certain it pours well, feels good, lid stays on, and the handle works. After a while it becomes second nature. However, every time I set out to do teapots it is a new challenge as it is usually only a few months of the year I do them.

 

best,

Pres

 

Awesome story.



#25 preeta

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:37 AM

well. i think the original intent of small holes WAS to catch the leaves. but in reality they dont work. i've used it all my child hood with all sorts of tea. and the long good expensive tea - still a few manage to escape. (wonder if reading tea leaves are a so i've been studying old english paintings and there is always a stylish strainer with each tea set to catch teh leaves. the holes are not small enough.  i have seen heirlooms of cutlery containing a matching strainer. or a fancy tea set come with a matching strainer (strainer made of metal but maybe a matching procelain handle)

 

in india every tea set is served with a strainer. (certain regions drink chai - (it is the indian work for tea). most of india drinks regular black tea usually with milk and sugar).


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