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RonSa    188

The tea pots that I have seen have small holes in the body by the spout. I'm wondering why a bigger single hole won't better?

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GEP    863

I make one large hole instead of smaller holes. I've been taught that the small holes are meant to catch tea leaves. To me, that doesn't make sense, because in order to make the holes small enough to work, it would be very tricky to glaze them without plugging the holes with glaze. If the holes are large enough to not get plugged with glaze, they won't perform their intended job.

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RonSa    188

We're on the same page Mea, on the tea pots I looked at better than half the holes were plugged up with glaze

 

Also. an infuser should do a better job catching the tea leaves or a strainer over the cup

 

Thanks

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Pres    896

I have been doing teapots with holes for years. Never had a problem with the glaze filling in. I guess I make my holes larger, and have a tendency of slightly beveling the clay around the hole-sanded the handle of the hole cutter rounded at the base. I really don't care about tea leaves so much, but find that the clay area is firmer for me to add the spout on to the teapot with the clay(even though holey) there to work with. This gives me added support that a large open hole does not have. I have a tendency to have a large area of holes, and a large spout base, as I like the amount of pressure this builds behind the spout so that the tea arcs out when pouring.

 

 

best,

Pres

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RonSa    188

Pres, what size holes do you make? The ones I've seen where slightly smaller than 1/8".

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Pres    896

Ron,

Most of mine are closer to 3/8-1/2 when cut, then you remember that the shrinkage is around 18%.

 

best,

Pres

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neilestrick    1,379

To keep small holes from filling in with glaze, wet the holes with a brush before glazing. Because the clay is already saturated it won't take in very much glaze. Immediately after dipping the glaze, blow through the spout to clean out the holes.

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Dick White    154

I was taught that the reason for the smaller holes vs. a single large opening between the body and the spout is less about straining the tea leaves and more about the fluid dynamics of pouring through a tapering spout. If the full volume of the tea in the pot is poured through the large hole into the tapering spout, the pressure inside the spout will build and the flow will gurgle out the end of the spout. The "strainer" holes in the body restrict the amount of tea that can flow into the spout and that keeps the flow out the end of the spot more regular. That's what I was taught.

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Chris Campbell    1,082

The best way to keep tea leaves out of the cup is to position the spout higher up the body of the teapot ... that way the heavier tea leaves don't get out until the pot is nearly empty.

As to the holes ... if they worked the way the 'catching tea leaves' theory says they should, they would plug up the spout and the tea would not pour at all.

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The holes should work fine if you're using a long leaf loose tea, which most North Americans don't. I was taught to glaze a teapot with a built in strainer by lining the interior, and before the glaze sets up, blow the excess glaze sharply back down the spout so the holes are all clear. It's much less hassle than messing around clearing the holes with a brush/pipe cleaner/whatever, or getting them all wet beforehand.

All of that said, one large hole works just ducky.

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RonSa    188

A lot of good info, thanks all

 

Dick: the fluid dynamics of pouring through a tapering spout with smaller holes makes a lot of sense

 

Chris: sounds reasonable. I guess I could even make the first row of holes a bit higher to accomplish the same thing. And about clogging, I can see that happening.

 

Neil: I've been pouring commercial glazes at this time and found that I have to soak or even dunk a pot in water to prevent to much glaze soaking in the bisque. Otherwise the glaze sticks on way to thick.

 

Pres: 3/8 -1/2 sounds way better than 1/8"

 

Callie: when I was a kid when my mother would say "just ducky" which was her code for "Don't Do It". I'm thinking you mean it works OK. :huh::lol:

 

I'm going to throw two tea pots, one with a few holes and one with one big hole

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neilestrick    1,379

The holes should work fine if you're using a long leaf loose tea, which most North Americans don't. I was taught to glaze a teapot with a built in strainer by lining the interior, and before the glaze sets up, blow the excess glaze sharply back down the spout so the holes are all clear. It's much less hassle than messing around clearing the holes with a brush/pipe cleaner/whatever, or getting them all wet beforehand.

All of that said, one large hole works just ducky.

 

In my experience, with small holes the glaze will set up and plug them before it can be blown out, especially with porcelain which takes in water quickly. And with runny glazes like I use the holes will fill up during the firing, so a thin layer of glaze is necessary, which wetting the holes before glazing accomplishes. It only takes a few seconds to wet them with a floppy brush.

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Pres    896

Ron,

I have a chart in one of last years posts that has a bunch of teapot info on it, that may help you out if you are just exploring this form for the first time.

 

best,

Pres

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RonSa    188

 vocal inflection is probably also important.

 

and the look... 

 

I haven't heard that phase in over 50 years.

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Min    777

The best way to keep tea leaves out of the cup is to position the spout higher up the body of the teapot ... that way the heavier tea leaves don't get out until the pot is nearly empty.

 

 

Think this depends on how you like your tea, I was taught to put the spout low on teapots and high on coffee. Reason being that the tea is stronger at the bottom of the pot where the leaves are, if you pour from the top of the pot you are pouring the weak tea first. Coffee pots don't have this issue so pour from the top. 

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RonSa    188

I guess teapots just don't look pretty there is a science behind them too.

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Pres    896

I had a booth at Penn State festival years ago-mid 90's. In the heat of one day a guy came up the road stopping at potter's booths. He was carrying a bucket of water. He stopped at every potter, talked to the potter and then poured water into the teapots the potter had. He did this often enough that I had plenty of warning before he got to my booth. He was very nice, we chatted a while, and he told me he was buying a teapot or two, and wanted pots that poured well felt good, and were nicely finished. He asked if he could check out my teapots, as I had about 8 on display. Each one he poured from, making comments etc. He had a crowd behind him, really creating a scene in a lot of ways on a busy Friday. After pouring and perusing, without a word he bought three-the first three he had bought that day. He emptied his bucket, packed a pot in it, and carried the others in the bag I provided. Lucky me! The rest of that day all of my tea pots were sold. Science yes, luck even better, and I check everyone I ever sell to make certain it pours well, feels good, lid stays on, and the handle works. After a while it becomes second nature. However, every time I set out to do teapots it is a new challenge as it is usually only a few months of the year I do them.

 

best,

Pres

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Joseph F    865

I had a booth at Penn State festival years ago-mid 90's. In the heat of one day a guy came up the road stopping at potter's booths. He was carrying a bucket of water. He stopped at every potter, talked to the potter and then poured water into the teapots the potter had. He did this often enough that I had plenty of warning before he got to my booth. He was very nice, we chatted a while, and he told me he was buying a teapot or two, and wanted pots that poured well felt good, and were nicely finished. He asked if he could check out my teapots, as I had about 8 on display. Each one he poured from, making comments etc. He had a crowd behind him, really creating a scene in a lot of ways on a busy Friday. After pouring and perusing, without a word he bought three-the first three he had bought that day. He emptied his bucket, packed a pot in it, and carried the others in the bag I provided. Lucky me! The rest of that day all of my tea pots were sold. Science yes, luck even better, and I check everyone I ever sell to make certain it pours well, feels good, lid stays on, and the handle works. After a while it becomes second nature. However, every time I set out to do teapots it is a new challenge as it is usually only a few months of the year I do them.

 

best,

Pres

 

Awesome story.

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preeta    80

well. i think the original intent of small holes WAS to catch the leaves. but in reality they dont work. i've used it all my child hood with all sorts of tea. and the long good expensive tea - still a few manage to escape. (wonder if reading tea leaves are a so i've been studying old english paintings and there is always a stylish strainer with each tea set to catch teh leaves. the holes are not small enough.  i have seen heirlooms of cutlery containing a matching strainer. or a fancy tea set come with a matching strainer (strainer made of metal but maybe a matching procelain handle)

 

in india every tea set is served with a strainer. (certain regions drink chai - (it is the indian work for tea). most of india drinks regular black tea usually with milk and sugar).

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