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Tea Pots


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#1 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:06 AM

The tea pots that I have seen have small holes in the body by the spout. I'm wondering why a bigger single hole won't better?


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#2 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:27 AM

I always thought they were small to catch most of the loose leaf tea on the way out.


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#3 GEP

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:41 AM

I make one large hole instead of smaller holes. I've been taught that the small holes are meant to catch tea leaves. To me, that doesn't make sense, because in order to make the holes small enough to work, it would be very tricky to glaze them without plugging the holes with glaze. If the holes are large enough to not get plugged with glaze, they won't perform their intended job.
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#4 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:49 AM

We're on the same page Mea, on the tea pots I looked at better than half the holes were plugged up with glaze

 

Also. an infuser should do a better job catching the tea leaves or a strainer over the cup

 

Thanks


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#5 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:57 AM

I have been doing teapots with holes for years. Never had a problem with the glaze filling in. I guess I make my holes larger, and have a tendency of slightly beveling the clay around the hole-sanded the handle of the hole cutter rounded at the base. I really don't care about tea leaves so much, but find that the clay area is firmer for me to add the spout on to the teapot with the clay(even though holey) there to work with. This gives me added support that a large open hole does not have. I have a tendency to have a large area of holes, and a large spout base, as I like the amount of pressure this builds behind the spout so that the tea arcs out when pouring.

 

 

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#6 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:01 AM

Pres, what size holes do you make? The ones I've seen where slightly smaller than 1/8".


Ron


#7 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:17 AM

Ron,

Most of mine are closer to 3/8-1/2 when cut, then you remember that the shrinkage is around 18%.

 

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#8 neilestrick

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:31 AM

To keep small holes from filling in with glaze, wet the holes with a brush before glazing. Because the clay is already saturated it won't take in very much glaze. Immediately after dipping the glaze, blow through the spout to clean out the holes.


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#9 Dick White

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:44 AM

I was taught that the reason for the smaller holes vs. a single large opening between the body and the spout is less about straining the tea leaves and more about the fluid dynamics of pouring through a tapering spout. If the full volume of the tea in the pot is poured through the large hole into the tapering spout, the pressure inside the spout will build and the flow will gurgle out the end of the spout. The "strainer" holes in the body restrict the amount of tea that can flow into the spout and that keeps the flow out the end of the spot more regular. That's what I was taught.



#10 Chris Campbell

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:01 AM

The best way to keep tea leaves out of the cup is to position the spout higher up the body of the teapot ... that way the heavier tea leaves don't get out until the pot is nearly empty.
As to the holes ... if they worked the way the 'catching tea leaves' theory says they should, they would plug up the spout and the tea would not pour at all.
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#11 Diesel Clay

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:59 AM

The holes should work fine if you're using a long leaf loose tea, which most North Americans don't. I was taught to glaze a teapot with a built in strainer by lining the interior, and before the glaze sets up, blow the excess glaze sharply back down the spout so the holes are all clear. It's much less hassle than messing around clearing the holes with a brush/pipe cleaner/whatever, or getting them all wet beforehand.
All of that said, one large hole works just ducky.

#12 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:09 AM

A lot of good info, thanks all

 

Dick: the fluid dynamics of pouring through a tapering spout with smaller holes makes a lot of sense

 

Chris: sounds reasonable. I guess I could even make the first row of holes a bit higher to accomplish the same thing. And about clogging, I can see that happening.

 

Neil: I've been pouring commercial glazes at this time and found that I have to soak or even dunk a pot in water to prevent to much glaze soaking in the bisque. Otherwise the glaze sticks on way to thick.

 

Pres: 3/8 -1/2 sounds way better than 1/8"

 

Callie: when I was a kid when my mother would say "just ducky" which was her code for "Don't Do It". I'm thinking you mean it works OK. :huh: :lol:

 

I'm going to throw two tea pots, one with a few holes and one with one big hole


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#13 neilestrick

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:17 AM

The holes should work fine if you're using a long leaf loose tea, which most North Americans don't. I was taught to glaze a teapot with a built in strainer by lining the interior, and before the glaze sets up, blow the excess glaze sharply back down the spout so the holes are all clear. It's much less hassle than messing around clearing the holes with a brush/pipe cleaner/whatever, or getting them all wet beforehand.
All of that said, one large hole works just ducky.

 

In my experience, with small holes the glaze will set up and plug them before it can be blown out, especially with porcelain which takes in water quickly. And with runny glazes like I use the holes will fill up during the firing, so a thin layer of glaze is necessary, which wetting the holes before glazing accomplishes. It only takes a few seconds to wet them with a floppy brush.


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#14 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:06 PM

Ron,

I have a chart in one of last years posts that has a bunch of teapot info on it, that may help you out if you are just exploring this form for the first time.

 

best,

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#15 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:26 PM

I'll search for it Pres, thanks


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#16 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:32 PM

Go to my website listed in my posts

 

http://picworkspotte...7&by-date=false

 

 

best,

Pres


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#17 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 01:59 PM

Thanks Pres


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#18 Diesel Clay

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:37 PM

Ah, yes Ron, I meant it would work all right :)
I think ducky and "fine" are probably interchangeable in both instances, and vocal inflection is probably also important.

#19 RonSa

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 05:15 PM

 vocal inflection is probably also important.

 

and the look... 

 

I haven't heard that phase in over 50 years.


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#20 S. Dean

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 05:33 PM

Check out this take on a teapot strainer by Jamie Kirkpatrick.  http://www.jkpottery.com/Teapots.html  (Influenced by John Neely).  

 

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