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Advice Needed! Cone 06 Clay With Cone 6 Glaze - Yikes!

glaze kiln issues cone 6 cone 06 whiteware

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#1 hibernaculum

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:27 PM

Hi Y'all - I'm super stressing cause I don't know if I can reverse my mistake. The studio I work at uses a kiln that can fires to a max of cone 10, but regularly fires at cone 06 and uses EM342 whiteware clay. I somehow totally missed the memo and thought I heard them say we fire at cone 6 (!) so I went ahead and bought some really beautiful cone 5-6 glazes, covered a handful of pieces in them, and, to probably no one on this forum's surprise (but to my total dismay) they came out all kinds of wacky :( Is there any way I can salvage my pieces? 

 

One thought - could I fire the pieces again at cone 6? Would the clay be able to withstand that? 

 

Your ideas would be appreciated - thanks!

 

 



#2 Denice

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:31 AM

I am not familiar with that clay but if it is low fire clay the answer is no.  I have seen low fire clay melt into a puddle when fired to high.  You could hurt the kiln, shelves and other peoples work.  You wouldn't have a good glaze fit between the 06 clay and 6 glaze, more glaze problems than I can list.  Sorry they need to be thrown away, all potters have things like this happen to them.  It is part of the learning process.   Denice



#3 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:01 AM

Denice is right on with her advice. This is why so many studios do not allow outside clay or glazes. Whenever you fire a ^06 clay at 6, you are basically firing clay that is in most cases a ^6-10 glaze. Imagine the melt down in the kiln of all of that clay! I shudder to think of the bill for the repairs.

 

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Pres


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#4 hibernaculum

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:32 PM

Bullocks - I was afraid of this! Denice you're so right, this is a great learning opportunity and one I'll be sure to double, no, triple check in the future!

 

I had another thought - do you think I could potentially clear glaze over my pieces (as they exist now, with the strange and incomplete cone 6 glaze) and refire them at cone 06? That way I hopefully wouldn't do any damage to anyone else's pieces, and no puddles would be created, but perhaps I can salvage some small bit of my work? 

 

Thanks again! 



#5 Chris Campbell

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 01:15 PM

Sure you could, but at this point you are wasting time and energy. They are not going to look any better ... maybe just shiny.
Time to take it as a lesson learned and move on. :- )
Your next pieces will certainly be 100% better.
Chris Campbell Pottery
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>TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT"

" If a sufficient number of people are different, no one has to be normal "

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#6 Mark C.

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:43 PM

Ceramic lessons are often hard ones-but you have one under your belt now.Move on and always ask about the memo.


Mark Cortright
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#7 hibernaculum

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:11 PM

I don't mean to be obnoxious by asking yet another question about this - I think now I'm mostly curious what you all think would happen, as I've made peace with the fact that I'll more than likely need to part with these pieces- but would it hurt to fire them at cone 06 again? I have no clue what would happen...

Thanks again for all your insight! 



#8 Chris Campbell

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:23 PM

You are not being obnoxious at all ... ask away!!

Think of it like a cake ... you put the batter in a pan and bake it at 120 degrees instead of 350.
No matter how long you bake that mix it is never gonna be a fluffy cake.
If you cover it with icing it it still won't be a fluffy cake.
If you bake it again, it will only be a harder, drier tougher lump of icky batter.
Best to throw it out and start again.
Chris Campbell Pottery
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http://ccpottery.com/

>TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT"

" If a sufficient number of people are different, no one has to be normal "

Fredrick Bachman

#9 glazenerd

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:39 PM

The fluxes in a cone 06 glaze are first: usually different than those used in a cone 6. Secondly, a cone 6 glaze can have as much as 50% less flux levels compared to cone 06. So you could fire these pieces ten more times, and the result will be pretty much the same. There is just not enough flux, or the right kind of flux for low fire glazes.

 

I could fill many paragraphs with the mistakes I have made, the misfires, and the "dumb" mistakes I have made. The good news, dumb mistakes are easily fixed by learning. I will say it for the 100th time: you learn just as much by the mistakes as you do by doing it right....such is the learning curve of pottery.

 

Nerd



#10 hibernaculum

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:17 PM

Thank you all so much for your guidance on this one - I really appreciate it, I will take this lesson to heart and forge ahead! Onward to the wheel once more :) 



#11 Chilly

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 01:26 PM

but would it hurt to fire them at cone 06 again? I have no clue what would happen...

 

 

+1 to all above answers, but you will probably only believe the answers after you have experience them for yourself.  

 

Probably no harm will come to others work, you will just be wasting time, glaze and firing energy.  By all means cover with clear glaze, place on a cookie to protect the shelf and ask if they can be re-fired.

 

Some people can accept the "no it won't work" answers, the rest of us have to try it for ourselves.  You wouldn't believe how many times some of my stuff has been re-fired, then put back on the top of the kiln waiting for my next "what-if" moment. 


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#12 Magnolia Mud Research

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 03:42 PM

I would try glazing with the cone 06 glazes over the other "stuff" just to see what happens. My expectation would be some movement of the top coat, so I would plan for the consequences. Also inform the instructor and kiln operator so they can also plan where to put the pieces in the kiln.

LT

#13 hibernaculum

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Posted Yesterday, 10:25 AM

Hello everyone! I'm happy to report that my little mishap turned experiment worked out a-okay! I buffed the pieces lightly with sandpaper so they had some texture, put one coat of cone 06 glaze over, and retired - I'm pretty happy with the results! The pieces definitely have some strange texture and coloring, but in an intriguing way - thanks again for all your help :)



#14 Joseph F

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Posted Yesterday, 11:44 AM

Hello everyone! I'm happy to report that my little mishap turned experiment worked out a-okay! I buffed the pieces lightly with sandpaper so they had some texture, put one coat of cone 06 glaze over, and retired - I'm pretty happy with the results! The pieces definitely have some strange texture and coloring, but in an intriguing way - thanks again for all your help :)

 

can't tease us like this without pictures!







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