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Hi There,

I'm working on some porcelain stud earrings and refrigerator magnets. What is the best glue to use to attach ceramic to non ceramic like metal and the magnets. In the past I have tried superglue, which didn't work at all and hot glue, which works but tends to pop off unpredictably on glazed pieces.

I would like to be able to glue glazed ^6 porcelain.

Thanks!

 

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Mark C.    1,797

use e-6000

it at ace hardware stores-works well on all glazes and glass

 

I will add that when I had a magnet ceramic pin business in the 70s the best glue is a two part epoxy from west systemsI cannot recall if its 105 or 205? (boat supply store or online you need two parts)

I would still use that but I have a bunch. In that application we glued cone 06 unglazed backs to metal pins and magnets .strong as heck.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

yep. e-6000. I like the small four pack. It seems to stay fresher longer by opening one at a time.

 

Marcia

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Min    777

I've had rare earth magnets pop off the back of fridge vases when I used E6000, glue stayed on the pot but sheared away from the magnet. Happened to a few of them, then I started scratching up the magnet with a diamond pad, sandpaper is probably good enough though, and since starting to do that I haven't had any come off. (touch wood) Also found that scratching the side that will be in contact with the fridge helps it stay put on the fridge better too.

 

It's nasty stuff though. I wear a respirator and use it outside or in the spraybooth with a fan on. I've also used Devcon 2 part epoxy which smells far less but is more expensive.

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LeeU    328

My daughter is a jeweler's apprentice and will be finishing my jewelry pieces for me. I do the clay and she puts it together (necklaces/pins/bracelets.) She swears by the 2-part epoxy even if it requires special handling and costs a little more...says everything else will come apart in time.  I think she said their studio uses a West Systems product.

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rakukuku    122

I've been using JB Weld 2 part epoxy to glue ceramic creatures to metal wine bottle stoppers. So far so good.

 

I have also used PC 11. Both work well but the JB weld is softer and easier to mix and comes in tubes instead of jars like PC 11. Easier to squeeze out the tubes rather than dig it out of jars with popcicle sticks. 

 

I have also used gorilla glue epoxy for magnets. works pretty well too. 

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deborah6    0

I've used Metalset A4 11oz Kit Aluminum Filled Epoxy Adhesive for attaching french cleats to the backs of my hanging wall pieces. And I agree with Min, roughing up the service is a good thing to do.

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Tim Allen    8

re: roughing up the surface -- epoxies like WEST system create a mechanical bond and need some way to get a grip on the surface, thus rough sanding or scratching an otherwise smooth surface -- to give it "tooth"

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perkolator    53

West Systems is good epoxy.  I kinda prefer PC-7 and PC-11 I think because it's more available in my area.  JB weld is good depending on application - especially if you need heat resistance

 

Like said, roughing up the surface of the magnet will help a lot for getting a better bond.  My suggestion is to use the rare earth magnets that have the tapered screw hole in them, not the smooth ones.  These are meant for screwing onto objects for a much stronger mechanical bond vs adhesive.  For ceramics, simply leave a hole/recess where you plan to add the screw, add a dab of epoxy into the hole and then use a short screw -- the threads get anchored into the epoxy and that sucker isn't gonna come loose.

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