Jump to content
Jamie.Clark

Going To Buy Wheel And Kiln... What Do You Like?

Recommended Posts

Jamie.Clark    1

Hi all, 

 

I'm new to the forums and I'm getting ready to buy a new wheel and kiln and wanted to get everyone thoughts on brands and models. What to stay away from, what you like... As far as the kiln I'm looking at least 18" in height.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,381

Do a little searching here on the forum and you'll find billions of discussions about kilns and wheels.

 

For wheels, it's good idea to go try some out, either at your local distributor or at the local art center or college.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tanvi504    3

I am also fairly new to pottery. I first bought the Shimpo RK 55 wheel which I didnt like. It slowed down considerably every time I tried to center which is because of its weak motor. Then I bought a Brent CXC which I looooveeeee. This wheel is so powerful its amazing. And I purchased an L&L easy fire 18S kiln which is also really good. Very easy to operate and has ample space if you are just starting off. Just my two cents. :) Good luck !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

Wheels: Stuart and Bailey. I have had my bailey for about 17 years. Replaced some belts once and I blame that on a toxic environment that rotted the rubber off the wheels of my casters, soles of shoes, nylon off bags, etc. I think it was from the Matamoros MX dump. Anyway, My wheel is great, quiet and slow. I don't like fats wheels. The legs are adjustable. Also replaced the potentiometer with some guidance from superb customer support. I have a lot of Bailey equipment.

 

 

Kilns: I have 2 Super Axners 11 years old with over the top insulation, its coated elements. They are built by Olympic and the bigger one is no longer made. There are a lot of good kilns out there. Consider buying close to your location , if possible.I bought a Crucible test kiln off the floor at NCECA about 20+ years ago.Change a switch once. Fired to ^7 a lot. Same toxic environment corroded the bottom band off the base segment. But it still fires just fine.

 

 

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GEP    863

Wheels: Bailey and Thomas Stuart. I love the big integrated splashpans on these. I slightly prefer the splashpan on the Bailey because there is a gate that you can open and push all of your clay trimmings out into a bucket. However, just like Marcia I've had some small (easy to fix) maintenance issues with the Bailey, whereas the Stuart feels indestructible. Both are nice and quiet.

 

Kilns: L&L.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,381

I have 11 Thomas Stuart/Skutt wheels, and would never buy any other brand. The big splash pans keep my studio very clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Denice    243

I have always bought used kilns at my local ceramic supplier,  I'm not good at working on them and they work on the kilns they sell.  I have had a Paragon for 45 years,  Skutt for 35 years and a AIM test kiln for 20 years.  Older kilns aren't  computer controlled, so if you need that feature you need to research controllers that are on the kilns your looking at.    Denice  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

I own an L&L kiln that I have had since the 80's, it has no kiln setter or programmer on it. I also own a motorized Amaco kickwheel with a huge splash pan-sets in the basement and has not been used in years. That wheel was replaced with a Brent CXC that I have used with no upkeep since the early 90's. I have purchased Baileys for school when I worked there, and they are still running well. I would never buy another kiln other than the L&L, and am considering purchasing one in the the next year or so with a programmable unit. Wheels I do believe I would look into a Stuart, if I find I would like to replace the CXC, but before I did, I would have to sit at one and try throwing at least 20# to see how it handles it. My needs are varied, as I will throw chalice stems and bowls off of a 15#-20# hump, throw patens, bowls both off the hump and on bats, larger jars approaching 20#, and other items. I hate to have a wheel that groans when I crank on it, or even slows down. So I prefer one that fights back!

 

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Min    781

I took Neil's advice from a few months ago and paid the extra for a Genesis controller on a recent kiln purchase (ConeArt). Haven't used it for long but so far I'm loving it, really user friendly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LeeU    329

My wheel is a Brent ie-x and my kiln is the L&Le-23S-3. I love them both. I don't have a lot of wheel experience but the Brent makes the whole process seem easier than expected, because of its features, like reverse spin and removable legs for setting it up on a surface if desired. The kiln is a joy to use. The shorter height of the 23S is great for me for loading/un and setting shelves. It is super programmable and the settings of the Easy Fire and the Vary Fire produce reliable results (or I have been very lucky!). Both pieces of equipment were worth the spendoolies and I'm glad I didn't compromise. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
S. Dean    76

I bought a L&L Easyfire e28s kiln last spring.  With 3" brick, it's a tad under 7cu feet.  The shape is wider (28" vs 23") and lower (18" vs 27") than the typical 7 cubic foot kiln such as the L&L e23t.  These dimensions work better with the shape pots I make, and it is also easier on my back for loading.  If you keep an eye out, L&L will run a sporadic special where they include the vent if you buy a shelf kit.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RonSa    189

All things being equal, its almost like asking which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of lead? :)

 

That said, lets wait until the experts chime in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

You fill the space with different sized pots if throwing round forms. I making hand built pottery you can fill things easily. Like most other things. . . Ceramic it takes a bit of experience.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joseph F    865

I just usually put my handles in the corners of the hexagon, so I find it doesn't take away at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oldlady    1,323

you might be surprised to see that things can hang over the edges of the shelves so the shape is not as critical as you might think.  there are many ways to load a kiln, and just as many opinions about it.

 

as a new member, you will have the opportunity to look at the gallery section of this website.  there are lots of wonderful things to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,381

Bigger diameters load more efficiently, and squares load more efficiently than circles. But you can make anything work for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kaolinwasher    44

the portable lightweight, Artista potters wheel is great  just purs so smooth and does not lag when forking on it  and very affordable  as long as you don't plan on making 10gallon crocks with it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Saki    4

If this is your first purchase, may I recommend looking into a used wheel? If you are not sure what you need, this would be a good way to get your feet wet and figure out what features are important to you (e.g., if you aren't throwing huge pots, you probably don't need a lot of wheel that can center 225 lbs).

 

I bought a slightly used brent wheel that I found on craigslist for less than half the price of a new wheel. It works so well that I don't foresee an upgrade any time in the near future. (although I do covet the shimpo whisper wheel—it is so quiet!) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kev    0

Shimpo Whisper wheel works really good for me. Very quite, free spins when not pushing on the pedal and reversible. Did i mention its quite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×