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Qotw: Are You Afraid Of The White Gold?

Question of the week; porcelaine;

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#21 Pres

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 01:34 PM

I *can* work wth porcelain, and I fully appreciate the aesthetics of it. I just prefer working with clay that feels like ...clay. I love the things that iron does, and I like working with the properties inherent in my material, rather than against them. I want to embrace the grit and the beauty in "impurities."

Yeah, like you Diesel, I prefer working with something I can feel, not butter. My experience with porcelain in limited, but the times I worked with it, it almost felt . . . greasy. I guess I like a little tooth, but not so much as the 50% grog raku clay I worked with in the 70's.

 

 

best,

Pres


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#22 Joseph F

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 01:45 PM

I have thrown a lot of porcelain, but I always go back to a brown stoneware. Just like the final product better, closer to what I love, it isn't superior or inferior in any way. It is just different. 



#23 JBaymore

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 01:54 PM

I have never yet made a piece out of porcelain that I felt was really successful.  The pristine refinement of the material and the purity of the white just do not seem to mesh with the geologic and metamorphic aesthetic I am trying to capture.  And like other's here .... I do not like the "touch" of the clay in my hands. 

 

That being said... I do use porcelain for the lids of my chaire (tea ceremony matcha containers).. Keeps me away from ivory.  I can make it work for the lids.  The white and smoothness gives me a nice bit of contrast to the usual stoneware.

 

LOVE many porcelain works ....made by others.

 

best,

 

.................john


John Baymore
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#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 07:48 PM

I can see that in your work , John.
Nice mature response in understanding oneself. I like that.
Marcia
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#25 Pres

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 07:48 PM


 

LOVE many porcelain works ....made by others.

 

best,

 

.................john

 

Yes to that, I really love to see the purity of the white with some translucency. There are several porcelain artists out there that seem to own the clay, one comes to mind is Martha Grover.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#26 JBaymore

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 08:22 PM

Here  are porcelain artists whose work I find very successful.   kato-san is very materialistic in his approach to what happens to clay and glass in fire.  Fukami-san's has a bit of a "fire and ice" quality about it that is less "warm" than what I try to achieve.  Very powerful forms.

 

FUKAMI Sueharu 深見陶治

 

http://www.360doc.co...351415218.shtml

 

And another:

 

KATO Tsubusa 加藤委

 

http://www.galleryto...st/kts/kts.html

 

http://toku-art.sees.../4128954-1.html

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

 


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#27 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 05:53 AM

I count porcelain as more of a glaze you can throw rather than a clay that vitrifies.

 

I have tried once or twice and thought how horrible it was. Like when I drink a cup of tea and I am sad it's not coffee....


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#28 neilestrick

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 11:52 PM

Porcelain is unique among clay bodies. The lack of plasticity, almost a rubberiness, is terribly appealing once you get used to it. I would rather throw porcelain than stoneware any day, and actually find it easier to throw now. It was a difficult transition, though. I was a good stoneware thrower, but porcelain kicked my butt at first. I switched to porcelain because I wanted the whiteness, but it took me months and months to get used to it. I had to let it dry out until it was really stiff in order to successfully use it. I've been working with it for about 13 years now, so I've figured out what I can and can't do with it. I no longer worry about water- I drench it but work quickly. I don't baby the drying at all- after it's trimmed I just leave it out to dry. I find that drying speed after trimming is a non-issue if you make the walls even. I take a little more care from wet to leather hard, though, as the lip will dry very quickly. It's difficult to get things dry enough to trim in one day like I can do with stoneware. I also don't baby the firings at all. I often bisque my pieces on 'Fast Glaze', which is a 4.5 hour firing. Anything under 4 pounds can handle the fast firing just fine. I prefer to pull handles right on the pot, but I can't do it with porcelain. Instead, I pull them on a bisqued piece, then let it stiffen up and transfer it to the real pot. Once they're attached I can put them in the kiln and dry them out quickly if needed.

 

My students often ask me if they're 'ready' for porcelain, because they feel like they have to use it, like they're expected to 'move up' from stoneware. This attitude goes for moving from brown or buff stoneware to smooth white stoneware, too. I'm all for trying different clay bodies for the sake of expanding one's experience, but I stress to them that there's nothing wrong with using the groggy brown clay. It's all good stuff, just different. 


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www.neilestrickgallery.com

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#29 glazenerd

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 07:43 AM

 

I would rather thrown porcelain than stoneware any day,

Amen brother.



#30 juliad76

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 07:28 AM

Hello I only work with bone china if any one wants any info on this please just ask and I will do my best to answer any questions if you have any that is, I am fascinated by all the other clays but with only a small studio we cant have any contamination, the main items we make are horses and lampshade but have made all sorts of other items both large and small all of course are slip cast.



#31 glazenerd

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:23 AM

Juliad:

 

You can contact me via the PM messaging. Always interested in learning new things about clay/s.

 

Nerd



#32 Chilly

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 06:12 PM

Not yet.  Planning to buy a bag to make some extruded shapes for potter's camp this summer.


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#33 Mark C.

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:40 PM

Since this is a thread about white gold I figured that if anyone had some of that other gold colored gold that you could just mail it to me and I could dispose of it properly.

just click my link at bottom of page for address to sent that old gold stuff to.


Mark Cortright
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