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StacieBatten

Trouble Getting Kiln Information

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I recently acquired a kiln, and sadly I have no clue about it. It was my grandmother's, but she never got anywhere as far as information on it due to family health problems. Please if you have any information on these kilns will you please pass it along?? Thank you in advance!!!post-81174-0-94121700-1487805916_thumb.jpgpost-81174-0-54447200-1487806188_thumb.jpgpost-81174-0-27632700-1487806384_thumb.jpg

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may i suggest you look for a company whose name is JenKen.  they are in Lakeland florida.  this may be one of their early ones.  there is a recent discussion on them here.

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Your pictures show a good deal of information:

 

The kiln requires 45 amps; so your circuit will need a 60 amp circuit. Find a good electrician to look over the controller and do your wiring.

Max temperature looks to be 2300F -- cone 8, so your top temperature may be cone 6.

The kiln sitter is an older, Dawson manual model. Here is the manual for it: http://jenkenkilns.com/JenKenPDF/dawson-PK.pdfIt has three heating levels - low, medium, high. A starting firing schedule is two hours low, two hours medium, then high until your reach temperature. You will need to use cones to determine when you reach temperature.

 

The Jen-Ken site has a number of technical manuals; you might have to skim through them to see which might be helpful as one is not listed for the D-24 model.

 

Check with potters in your area to see if any fire a manual kiln. They can tell you a lot about how to proceed. There are also good books out there on firing an electric kiln that might be helpful.

Mark (Marko) Madrazo and LeeU like this

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Just put it in a dry area with the lid open, preferably with a dehumidifier. It will take a while. Wouldn't hurt to open up the control boxes to let the wiring dry out. You could also put a small space heater inside it with the lid open to warm it up. Hopefully the water hasn't degraded the bricks.

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Wet is bad. That's the last thing you want to happen to your kiln. You'll need it to be good and dry before you try to fire it up, and probably go through the electrical system to see if anything has corroded.

 

 

Amen, or have someone you dislike very much to test fire it for you. :lol:

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