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RonSa    189

Is it ok to brush on resist over dried glaze to prevent another glaze combining with the first?

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Marcia Selsor    1,301
neilestrick    1,381

On some glazes that are low in clay, when the glaze completely dries the wax will peel up since the glaze is too powdery to prevent it. I have a couple that do it. When it happens, it peels up the glaze with it and ruin your nice glaze job. To prevent that from happening, after you're all done glazing the pot and before the glaze has totally dried, lightly go over the wax with a torch to melt it into the glaze. Works like a charm. Or put the pot into the kiln and start the firing right away.

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Min    783

On some glazes that are low in clay, when the glaze completely dries the wax will peel up since the glaze is too powdery to prevent it. I have a couple that do it. When it happens, it peels up the glaze with it and ruin your nice glaze job. To prevent that from happening, after you're all done glazing the pot and before the glaze has totally dried, lightly go over the wax with a torch to melt it into the glaze. Works like a charm. Or put the pot into the kiln and start the firing right away.

The Mobilizer A oil based wax resist, that takes forever to dry, works super well on dusty glazes. Good to know the torch trick, thanks for sharing that.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Hamada discovered the liquid wax resist developed by Hank Melon (sp) in the 50s when Yanagi, Hamada and Bernard Leach were visiting the Bray.

The process he used as well as Dave Shaner, Leach and many disciples is this

Apply the coat for the design.

Brush on wax. Let it dry. Wash edges. Apply the second glaze. Wipe off the triplets on the wax resist.

Gives a nice clean edge.http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/hAkAAOSwZG9WktQu/s-l300.jpg

 

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

NCECA offers so much. It is exhausting and a rush of inspiration at the same time.Thanks for posting from the Process room.

 

Marcia

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oldlady    1,323

no video, just a black rectangle.

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RonSa    189

no video, just a black rectangle.

 

You either may have to enable javascript or you have something blocking the video on your end. An app like NoScript installed on your browser wiil do that.

 

Try this link

 

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Pugaboo    438

This is SO great I have been having just this problem. I decorate the clear glaze the image, wax, then glaze the rest of the piece. Leave to dry and EEEKKKKKK!

 

All my lovely work is ruined because the clear glaze peels up leaving awfulness behind.

 

I've also had it happen with my white glaze.

 

I'm off to order the Mobilizer-A.

 

T

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flowerdry    128

Don't personally have much experience with this, but our studio manager uses the wax over glaze technique a lot and swears by Aftosa brand.

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preeta    80

oooh Ronsa. welcome to the world of wax resist. endless possibilities. my favourite is carving the wax resist on the glaze and then washing the exposed area out and then applying another glaze. i dont do precise lines so i dont mind the wax peeling (in fact i prefer it). what i like about that is i get two layers of single glaze. not one on top of the other :) with iron rich glazes the edges of the carved out wax resist usually breaks into a different colour looking lovely.

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RonSa    189

my favourite is carving the wax resist on the glaze and then washing the exposed area out and then applying another glaze.

 

Ohh, the possibilities! Thanks

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Min    783

Don't personally have much experience with this, but our studio manager uses the wax over glaze technique a lot and swears by Aftosa brand.

 

Yeah, I think that would be a petroleum based one too. On their info sheet it says it takes 3 or 4 hours to dry which would make sense.

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preeta    80

 

my favourite is carving the wax resist on the glaze and then washing the exposed area out and then applying another glaze.

 

Ohh, the possibilities! Thanks

 

oh dont thank me. thank hamada. its his technique that i learnt when Marcia posted about it on a thread here. i havent seen the videos here but i have used wax to do multiple glazings without it being too time consuming. 

 

the thing about hamada's technique - for me was - that it made you think differently - and blew my mind to endless possibilities. it is brilliant in its simplicity.

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RonSa    189

On some glazes that are low in clay, when the glaze completely dries the wax will peel up since the glaze is too powdery to prevent it. I have a couple that do it. When it happens, it peels up the glaze with it and ruin your nice glaze job. To prevent that from happening, after you're all done glazing the pot and before the glaze has totally dried, lightly go over the wax with a torch to melt it into the glaze. Works like a charm. Or put the pot into the kiln and start the firing right away.

 

Is it possible to wax over bisque then use a torch to remove it so one could glaze over the bare bisque?

 

Kind of like the liquid frisket used with airbrushes?

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preeta    80

 

On some glazes that are low in clay, when the glaze completely dries the wax will peel up since the glaze is too powdery to prevent it. I have a couple that do it. When it happens, it peels up the glaze with it and ruin your nice glaze job. To prevent that from happening, after you're all done glazing the pot and before the glaze has totally dried, lightly go over the wax with a torch to melt it into the glaze. Works like a charm. Or put the pot into the kiln and start the firing right away.

 

Is it possible to wax over bisque then use a torch to remove it so one could glaze over the bare bisque?

 

Kind of like the liquid frisket used with airbrushes?

 

Why not use latex on glaze that you peel off before firing. not sure how latex would react over too powdery glaze. would it stick well enough?

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RonSa    189

Any type of latex (as in paint) or is there a formula designed for ceramics?

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preeta    80

Ronsa i know there is one designed for ceramics. the water colour one wont work. but i dont know if any type of latex would work too. the key with latex is just like water colour you ultimately have to take it off before firing. 

 

then there is shellac too. i think any shellac will do. i havent tried it yet. its something i would like to at least once. paint with shellac and then wash a couple of layers of clay away so the design stands out. the water carves out the design. like wax it burns off. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/etched-in-clay-how-to-make-beautiful-relief-surfaces-with-shellac-resist/

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neilestrick    1,381

 

On some glazes that are low in clay, when the glaze completely dries the wax will peel up since the glaze is too powdery to prevent it. I have a couple that do it. When it happens, it peels up the glaze with it and ruin your nice glaze job. To prevent that from happening, after you're all done glazing the pot and before the glaze has totally dried, lightly go over the wax with a torch to melt it into the glaze. Works like a charm. Or put the pot into the kiln and start the firing right away.

 

Is it possible to wax over bisque then use a torch to remove it so one could glaze over the bare bisque?

 

Kind of like the liquid frisket used with airbrushes?

 

 

You cannot burn off the wax and get it back to bare clay. The surrounding glaze will pop off as it heats up, and it just won't burn off cleanly.

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RonSa    189

Thanks, I just need to console myself to wait until my next supply order. Dang thing is I just placed one on Wednesday.

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