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porcelainbyAntoinette

Clay In Glazes.

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Someone asked me recently how I get the smooth interiors of my bowls. 

Potters that want smooth "non-drip" appearing glazes often struggle with it because they do not understand that clay(and opacifiers) in the clay will basically form a double layer in the areas where drips are formed. 

The only ways to prevent it, is to spray the glazes in a very controlled manner, or to sand drips that form down very carefully after it dried completely. Of cause drips are not necessarily wrong, but it must work along with the design of the object and not fight it. 
 

Anyone that have more ideas around this? 
 

Antoinette Badenhorst

PorcelainbyAntoinette.com

TeachinArt.com

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Guest JBaymore

In case people don't know..... this is what "fettling knives" are made for.  When you have a drippy run of glaze that is then thicker than the surrounding uniform part, and hence has more general opacity and coloring impact from the surrounding glaze layer,..... when dry you "fettle" it down to the same thickness as the rest of the glaze layer around it.  Basically... it is a straight razor and you are "shaving" the glaze off.

 

best,

 

...........john

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Clay for me is not a bad thing, as I understand it, a certain amount of clay allows the glaze to stay in suspension longer thus not needing constant mixing. Pinks are big culprits when using tin and chrome, as they often have to be kept mixed to get the tin pink coloring as shown on test tiles. At least this is how I have experience it, and I do also add Epsom salts to aid suspension in the glaze.

 

 

best,

Pres

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I shoot for at least 10% clay in my glazes. They go on nicer, stay suspended better, and aren't so powdery when loading the kiln. I've got some glaze that have over 20% clay, and they are a delight to apply. They go on smooth, and are tough as nails when handling them.

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I agree there must be clay in the glaze; also to add body and "glue" to the glaze. But it needs to be understood, or else it can become a headache for some. 
Glazes with the right amount of clay in, helps to have a very user friendly glaze. It will also allow easy brush decoration.  

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In case people don't know..... this is what "fettling knives" are made for. 

 I use the straight edge of a flexible metal rib. Same idea, same technique, different tool.

 

dw

 

 

And my favorite tool for this is the yellow MudTool rib. I scrape away glazes for other, different reasons mostly.

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I am curious Joel Edmondson; You say you use vinegar in your glazes. I use vinegar in my clay water on the wheel. It grow bacteria there ,so I was wondering if it does the same in your glazes?
Also it must loose its power over a period of time. How do you control that?

I started to experiment with bentones in my clay bodies to improve plasticity. I have learned that Veegum T also acts as a flux, so I wonder what would happen in glazes if we would add small amounts in the glaze to aid the Thixotropic character.

I am saying small amounts, because we also know that bentones slow the drying processes down.   

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Joe:

 

In the States: EPK is probably used the most, and Om4 ball clay right behind it. I use NZ kaolin, and there are some other ball clays used as well. Bentonites are used a lot: counted as a clay in the pottery community, even though they are really classified as a mineral.

 

Nerd

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