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Mossyrock

Transferring A Drawing To A Clay Slab

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I would like to transfer a drawing onto a moist clay slab.  I have tried copying it on my printer then putting the print-side down & ribbing the back, but it doesn't transfer.  Is there a certain type pen or marker I could use to trace the drawing onto paper (what kind?) that would then transfer to the slab?  I've tried several types that I have around the house, but nothing works.  I thought a dry erase marker on wax paper might work but it didn't.  Thanks for any ideas.  The transfer is for guidelines for carving so it's OK if they fire out.

yappystudent likes this

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Hi Brenda,

I use a litho crayon on paper, then follow the "litho process" from CAD video. It involves mixing "ink" of linseed oil and mason stain and a wash of gum arabic and water. Watch the video and take notes for the recipe. I have used it for photos too, but you need a printer as from kinkos or the post office in foreign countries. I taught this at a workshop in Vallauris, France as part of a raku Masters Class.

This is raku and the drawing was originally with a litho crayon. The University Bookstore may have them in the Art supplies section if they have a printmaking dept.

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2596-heronrakutransferjpg/

 

Next, these are from photos copied at Kinko's then inked following the litho process

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/5016-immigrants12-copy/

 

Marcia

Mossyrock and bciskepottery like this

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I did a search online and it looks like Dick Blick, Amazon, and Jerry's Artarama sell these crayons by the box. #1 is softest and higher numbers get harder -opposite of drawing pencils. Boxes ranging fro $6.80 to $10

usually in a campus bookstore, you can buy them by the stick rather than the box.

 

We used them in drawing classes at Art school. they are about 2.5" long.

Marcia

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Hi Brenda,

I use a litho crayon on paper, then follow the "litho process" from CAD video. It involves mixing "ink" of linseed oil and mason stain and a wash of gum arabic and water. Watch the video and take notes for the recipe. I have used it for photos too, but you need a printer as from kinkos or the post office in foreign countries. I taught this at a workshop in Vallauris, France as part of a raku Masters Class.

This is raku and the drawing was originally with a litho crayon. The University Bookstore may have them in the Art supplies section if they have a printmaking dept.

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2596-heronrakutransferjpg/

 

Next, these are from photos copied at Kinko's then inked following the litho process

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/5016-immigrants12-copy/

 

Marcia

Thank you Marcia!  The first link gives me an error message.  I'll check out the litho crayon on Amazon and the CAD video on litho process.

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Chris,does it leave the image after firing?Marcia

I am trying to remember where I got that process from ... it might be an old CAD or CM article ... the potter used it to put images onto rounded forms like vases so I don't think any lines were left behind ... as far as I can remember it burned out ... I only used the process a couple times so the details have not stayed with me.

I think it also works on images printed up with old printers that have the carbon type toner.

If anyone does a test and fires it, please let us know.

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post-2431-0-29644600-1485642453_thumb.jpgspent two days watching Kim Kirchman transfer drawings into paintings on newsprint paper and then transferring the colorful images onto slabs.  they were then made into mugs, butter dishes with lids and a bowl.  beautiful work.   outstanding color and line.  using amaco velvet underglaze and stroke & coat together in a palette.  the lines were drawn with velvet black ug and tuxedo black stroke & coat together.  the lines were drawn with tiny plastic bottles with very fine nibs.  

 

still processing this info and hoping to use the technique myself.  i get really tired of green.

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Marcia Selsor likes this

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I have also traced an image with ballpoint pen that I wanted to carve into a slab. I squeegeed it onto the clay ink side down and then wet it. The ink transferred to the clay well enough to give me guidelines. This is a very low tech way but worked really well for what I wanted to do and used only materials I already had in the house. 

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It had been a few years since I did this ... I traced the picture with a Sharpie marker then placed it on the slab so it was marker side down. Then wet the page with rubbing alcohol and the marker transfers to the slab.

I will give that a try Chris.  Thanks.  I want the image to fire out....I just need it there to give me some carving guidelines.  Did you use just regular bond paper?

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I have also traced an image with ballpoint pen that I wanted to carve into a slab. I squeegeed it onto the clay ink side down and then wet it. The ink transferred to the clay well enough to give me guidelines. This is a very low tech way but worked really well for what I wanted to do and used only materials I already had in the house. 

I think the thing I was missing was wetting the paper to make the ink transfer.  I'll give it a try with water and, as Chris suggested, with rubbing alcohol.  I'm looking for carving guidelines so it's fine if it burns out in the firing.  Thank you.

GiselleNo5 likes this

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attachicon.gifkirchman demo 001.JPGspent two days watching Kim Kirchman transfer drawings into paintings on newsprint paper and then transferring the colorful images onto slabs.  they were then made into mugs, butter dishes with lids and a bowl.  beautiful work.   outstanding color and line.  using amaco velvet underglaze and stroke & coat together in a palette.  the lines were drawn with velvet black ug and tuxedo black stroke & coat together.  the lines were drawn with tiny plastic bottles with very fine nibs.  

 

still processing this info and hoping to use the technique myself.  i get really tired of green.

Wow, beautiful pictures!  I think that's a workshop I would have enjoyed and learned a lot.  I use velvet underglazes and I use S&C, but I never thought of mixing the two together.  Did she then put a clear glaze over everything?  

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Brenda

I reloaded the first image. here it is. it is working for me.

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2596-heronrakutransferjpg/

Humm, I tried it from this link and got the same message.  

attachicon.gifCAD.png

 

 

Me too..  I also searched for Heron in the gallery and didn't find one with that file name, but there are some beautiful herons by Marcia.

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I am trying to post this straight from my jpg folder

 

the tile with heron was drawn with a litho crayon and inked directly with the mason stain/linseed oil.Raku fired

If you want multiple copies , xerox from a machine at kinks. remember to reverse the copy in you want the exact image to result after the transfer.

 

the second image shows the gradation you can achieve when doing this method. Either using a photo or a drawing with tonal variation. These were images from archival immigration records that I transferred porcelain tiles for an installation about American immigrants called Mi Familia Americana/ My American Family. If you need any further explanation , just ask.

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NancyAmores and Mossyrock like this

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mossy, yes, she covered them all with one of amaco's clear glazes.  would give you the number but the notebook is outside in the car. the amaco glaze number is LG 10.             it probably doesn't matter which of the amaco clear glazes you would use, it is thinned a lot. too cold today to go out after yesterday and friday outside for hours in the cold.  she also wood fires very hot and does not lose the color.  the third image is soda fired in her wood kiln. 

 

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