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glazenerd

Slip Recipes

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Spring is on the way, and I saw robins in the yard already- a month ahead of schedule.

 

I have finished my porcelain study, almost done with stoneware, and done with crystalline. So this spring and summer, I am going to look more closely at slips and standard cone 6 glazes. I have an interest in slips; to be used in non-traditional applications. Have these thoughts rolling around about using slip as color nodes, or for colorant fields for a runny glaze to leach color from as it runs through it.

 

I am sure there are books out there, but I usually do not read them until after I get done experimenting. Do not learn very much by reading them; they tend to be shy on technical information (chemistry). So if you have some generic slip recipes floating around that I can "rearrange"; please send them along please.

 

Nerd

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Preeta:

 

Mostly oxides, stains are tough to draw color out of unless you use an amphoretic (highly caustic) oxides like zinc. Some of my thoughts do not include colorants at all; but incorporating some chemistry to alter how the glaze reacts, reflects, and distorting the appearance. Slips just strike me as an area in pottery, where its full potential has not been tapped into.

 

Nerd

 

An example would be lava glaze. The chemistry used to create it, could be incorporated into the slip. Then you could apply a base glaze that would react to it; and as it passes through the area where the slip is applied: that area would create a lava effect. The rest of the piece would have an appearance of a normal glaze. That would give the potter the freedom to "decorate" with lava glaze instead of being restricted to just dipping a portion of the piece in a lava glaze. In essence, using slips as reactants. I have not looked into slips all that closely, but I suspect they can be formulated to nearly dissolve into the glaze as it passes by.

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Breakthrough glazes, James Chappell pages 187 - 194. Not slips but using two glazes, the base boils & breaks through the top glaze.

example : base glaze cone 6 (mottled gloss brown) : Albany slip 92%, rutile 6 %, EPK 2% bentonite 2% CMC 1 tsp. / Top glaze cone 6 (off white) : Lithium Carbonate 6.9%, CaCO3 6%,rutile 11.1%, ZnO2 19.9%, SiO2 22.6%, bentonite 2%, CMC 1 tsp. Fire to cone 6 in oxidation. 

Can add colorants.

One of my fav. books to start experiments with.

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:o  :huh:  lava glaze?!!! OH BOY nerd. you are talking texture here too. you blew another door wide open. from another thread where you posted a tile i thought you were working on colour with slip. but now texture too!!!! and reactions?!!! ooooooooh!!!!

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Glaze test results, that I ran yesterday. No slip was used- just glaze experiments.  Cone 6 OX.

 

 

In this experiment; I was using a chemical boundary to force the glaze run into the area I selected. The brown lines are markers, so I could follow where the glaze went, and where it did not. It was 50% successful.

 

 
Experiment was testing variegation in a single glaze application: this is not a layered glaze. A Raspberry Creme, would be a good name for this glaze.
 

Nerd Exp.3

 
Variegation was also being tested on this piece. This is also a single application, with additional glaze loaded on the neck. At the base of the neck, I had applied a chemical barrier to prevent the glaze from running any further than I had marked. The copper broke to the blue side, and likewise cream colors broke through as well (in a single application). The more remarkable result: this glaze has a Si/AL ratio of 9.25; which should have produced a very high gloss. I add 2% of an optically negative element, which resulted in a nearly matte glaze.

 

 

Nerd

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Here's an easy way to make deflocculated slip without having to measure out a bunch of stuff: Completely dry out a bunch of your clay body. Break it into pieces. They don't have to be really small. Then put it in a container and fill it with water until it covers the clay. Let it sit overnight. The clay will slake down into mush at the bottom of the container. Do not stir it! Carefully pour off all the water on top. What you have left will be a very thick slip. Add sodium silicate by drops while mixing smooth with a stick blender until you get the consistency you want.

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