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LeeU

Black Wax Resist

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It's for doing

. The black remains, the wax burns off. You slip trail or brush the wax on then fill in the spaces with glaze. Wax probably won't work to screen with, original formulas were oil based I believe.. (I linked the video mostly because I like the brushes the women are using)
LeeU and RonSa like this

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I would love to hear recommendations for black wax resist. I want to use it, but I tried Aftosa's and half of it flaked off after glaze firing. It would have been better if it had ALL flaked off. :( 

 

I used it to add design and matte texture against glossy glaze. For example, jewel green glaze and then a matte black design. Very pretty. I dug up some photos of this type of technique but I didn't have black wax resist so it was painstakingly done with black matte glaze which I painted carefully over with wax resist. Theoretically this could be done with black wax resist if it didn't flake off!! 

 

Here is the project that would have been great with black wax resist: 

 

med_gallery_67168_1310_64129.jpg

 

This is one of my VERY FIRST PROJECTS so it kind of makes me cringe. The tiles aren't even square. >.<

 

med_gallery_67168_1310_443519.jpg

NancyAmores likes this

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they are fine!  good color choices.  you might want to get a book from your library about making and decorating tiles with a wonderfully clear description by a lady in cleveland,  her name is Angelica Pozo and she has written 2 books.  both are very worthwhile.  i always go the library route because i have no space for the thousands of books i have read over the years. and no $.  

 

i think the second book is where she suggests a motif to be done in many different ways, an example of her continuing to teach with simple examples that anyone can do.  some authors skip around but this is a quality book with good examples and lots of photos.

 

she talks about cuerda seca and gives a recipe.   i called her and she clarified one step for me but it was something i did not want to pursue right then.

GiselleNo5 and D.M.Ernst like this

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Somewhere I have a jar of some balsam liquid that I got in Spain for making Cuerda de seco. It is used as a linear decoration to allow for raised glazed areas. I think maybe it ( the traditional blend) won't work for large areas. It is basically a greased line with manganese.

Marcia

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I have also been looking into this.  I was planning to use Amaco velvet undergalze for the black line area, then going back over with wax before glazing.  I was thinking if the underglaze is not dark enough than adding some synthetic colorant.  Has anyone tried this method yet.  I know it seems time consuming but I havent come up with anything else.

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I have been looking into this style of tile also.  The only thing I could come up with was using Amaco velvet underglazes, then applying wax over it.  I thought if the underglaze wasn't dark enough to add some synthetic colorant.  Has anyone else tried this method yet?

 

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I used to use it a lot in raku to make little dots then cover with clear glaze. under glaze seemed to run under the clear raku glaze - I think because it was 80% ghersly borate which is a powerful flux.

 

I use it now for a dull black next to a shiny black. The commercially made black wax is not available here anymore so I make my own with mason stain and regular was. It settles out and you have to mix it a lot. Our tile people use cureda secca a lot on tiles that they make with olive oil and mason stain.

GiselleNo5 likes this

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Wow--who knew? Thanks. Cool video---the detailed precision of the tile work is amazing (tho definately not enticing to my inherent lack of patience for mechanical design-type lines; give me a mop brush and a sponge and forget the ruler LOL). I did note how he used the stick to keep his hand steady-- will use that tip at some point, for sure.   

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Here is another youtube on cuerda seca which translates as "dry line" . The repetition of the patterns are transferred by pouncing... rubbing graphite through pinholes in the paper stencils. This is a traditional technique for majolica common in Spain and Italy.The line is traditionally made with a balsam oil or grease mixed with manganese.California tiles following the Spanish tradition may have developed more available material and Aftosa has the black wax resist.

 

 

Marcia

LeeU likes this

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Interesting video Marcia,

 

The board the person is using to rest their hand on, is there space between it and the tile or does the glaze dry that fast?

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there is space.  you can make something similar by gluing thin or thick, depending on use, erasers to a yardstick.  or a thicker board.

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Interesting video Marcia,

 

The board the person is using to rest their hand on, is there space between it and the tile or does the glaze dry that fast?

I think there is a space. I have an easel for round pots, nut I have seen all types of support for leaning over murals while painting.

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