Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Wooden Throwing Tools


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 RonSa

RonSa

    Still learning

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 193 posts
  • LocationNortheast Pa

Posted 11 January 2017 - 09:10 AM

I have various throwing tools, as I'm sure as do others, I'm beginning to wonder if I should apply some type of finish/oil to them.

 

I'm thinking of Boiled Linseed oil might be a good oil to use.

 

Any thoughts 


Ron


#2 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,199 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 11 January 2017 - 09:38 AM

I have never put anything on my wooden ribs and some of them are forty years old,  I understand that petroleum jelly is  easy maintenance.  Wooden ribs are usually made out of a wood that resist water,  letting them dry overnight should take care of them.     Denice



#3 Magnolia Mud Research

Magnolia Mud Research

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 192 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 11 January 2017 - 05:58 PM

I use linseed oil on mine, based on my own experience and that of Dutch farmers that wear wooden shoes when working in wet mud.  Without the linseed oil treatment the shoes 'rot' before they are 'worn' out.  My shoes were worn out on concrete in about 3 years, but only because of the concrete, not water damage. 

 

LT



#4 RonSa

RonSa

    Still learning

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 193 posts
  • LocationNortheast Pa

Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:23 PM

Thanks LT,

 

Linseed oil can take months even years to dry while boiled linseed oil dries in 24 hours. I guess it can't hurt to try it on one tool and see how it goes.


Ron


#5 docweathers

docweathers

    Gismo Guy

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 624 posts
  • LocationSpokane Wa

Posted 11 January 2017 - 10:34 PM

I put green soap  on my  wooden tools. It not only protects the wood  but reduces the amount of gunk that sticks  to them.


Larry

Lawrence Weathers

Gismo Guy

Spokane WA


#6 oldlady

oldlady

    single firing an electric kiln to cone 6

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,152 posts
  • Locationharpers ferry west va and pinellas park fl

Posted 11 January 2017 - 11:06 PM

doc, could you please identify by brand name the thing that has always been called "green soap" without any explanation of what it really is?  i have wondered for 35 years.  it is also a parting agent when making plaster molds, i think.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#7 docweathers

docweathers

    Gismo Guy

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 624 posts
  • LocationSpokane Wa

Posted 12 January 2017 - 12:02 AM

I got my green soap  on eBay. It is made by 

 

COSCO soap and detergent company, 1930 Troulman St, Ridgewood, NY.

 

Here's the link to The stuff that I have on eBay http://www.ebay.com/...AOSwlfxXFkoFAnd

 

It's really slippery stuff.


Larry

Lawrence Weathers

Gismo Guy

Spokane WA


#8 MatthewV

MatthewV

    Alaskan

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • LocationAlaska

Posted 12 January 2017 - 03:20 AM

I use boiled linseed oil on wooden tools. It makes them feel nicer too. My veneer plywood tabletops were also treated with several layers of linseed oil also seem to be holding up just fine after a year of heavy use.


Make More Mistakes


#9 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,926 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:09 AM

I use a furniture finish from IKEA on my tools of late, it is just a rub on and dry off. At the same time, I made a bunch of tools in the HS and used a 50/50 of turpentine and linseed oil. I would soak the tools in this for a few hours, take them out rub them down with a cloth and let them dry. Worked real well. These days, I make some tools using bamboo kitchen tools, seems like the bamboo does not get damaged by water even when laying in it for days.   :)

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#10 RonSa

RonSa

    Still learning

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 193 posts
  • LocationNortheast Pa

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:03 AM

Thanks again, boiled linseed oil it is.

 

Pres, if you are talking about Behandla Wood Treatment from Ikea then that product is basically watered down boiled linseed oil.


Ron


#11 Magnolia Mud Research

Magnolia Mud Research

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 192 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:12 AM

Ron,

 

I don't know if the stuff in my can was boiled or not.  It was whatever was available at the hardware store.  Yea, I know there is a difference, but since there was only one type of kan at the store, I took what was available.  What I am using for my tools now, is so covered with dust it is unreadable.  Probably was boiled, but don't know.  It dries in about a day +/- , probably boiled.  Pint can ~ 30 yrs old. 

 

LT



#12 RonSa

RonSa

    Still learning

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 193 posts
  • LocationNortheast Pa

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:56 AM

If it dries in a +/- a day its boiled.


Ron


#13 oldlady

oldlady

    single firing an electric kiln to cone 6

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,152 posts
  • Locationharpers ferry west va and pinellas park fl

Posted 12 January 2017 - 11:13 AM

thank you, doc.


"putting you down does not raise me up."




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users