Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JamesP

Preventing Glaze From Running On Pipes

Recommended Posts

Good day, I create ceramic pipes and have been having issues with the bowls / bottoms of the pipes encountering runny glaze. I fire mostly cone7to10 in my natural gas kiln and my problem has occurred most when I dip glaze for 3 seconds. I have spray glazed with greater success but it is cold outside where I spray and I want to stay warm inside. I do production so time is important which means brush glazing takes to long and should be out of the question. So do you have any tips on how to prevent my glazes from running and ruining my pipes? Less dip time? Deal with the cold? Face the long time of brushing? Or maybe dip the top half of the pipe and then the bottom half for 1second and brush the glaze in the bowl? To better understand the question and see my work you can visit ceramicsmokeware . com. Know that your time and replies are much appreciated. Thanks, James P

post-68956-0-92886100-1483721009_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most traditional ceramic pipes I have seen are unglazed. Maybe you could wax the bowl and not glaze it. Otherwise use lighter application /less glaze around the bowl and carburetor to avoid clogging. Try a glaze with higher viscosity -less tendency to run.

It will require testing.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to keen on the ceramic pipe dope wholesale thing. I have to hand it to you being Utah based. I did not think of state state as progressive in this way.

Seems like whatever it takes to spay as that works is what you need to do. Just get a small indoor spray booth going? not sure what this would not be easy as they are easy to make and you can even buy them ready made.-they collect the overspray as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cone 7 to 10 is a big range. Most glazes will have issues across that broad a temperature range. Cone 10 glazes will be undefired at 7, and cone 7 glazes will be overfired at cone 10. If you're mixing your own glazes, increase the clay content to stiffen up the glaze. If you're using commercial glazes you just need to fire lower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cone 7 to 10 is a big range. Most glazes will have issues across that broad a temperature range. Cone 10 glazes will be undefired at 7, and cone 7 glazes will be overfired at cone 10. If you're mixing your own glazes, increase the clay content to stiffen up the glaze. If you're using commercial glazes you just need to fire lower.

My glazes are rated for cone6 to 10 and my kiln fires uneven.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to keen on the ceramic pipe dope wholesale thing. I have to hand it to you being Utah based. I did not think of state state as progressive in this way.

Seems like whatever it takes to spay as that works is what you need to do. Just get a small indoor spray booth going? not sure what this would not be easy as they are easy to make and you can even buy them ready made.-they collect the overspray as well.

Well a spray booth would be to small so I think that is not an option

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most traditional ceramic pipes I have seen are unglazed. Maybe you could wax the bowl and not glaze it. Otherwise use lighter application /less glaze around the bowl and carburetor to avoid clogging. Try a glaze with higher viscosity -less tendency to run.

It will require testing.

Marcia

The glaze still runs with wax plus waxing 100's of pipes is not what I want to do. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about spraying the bowls with another stiffer less runny glaze and the rest of the pipe with the other glaze?

They make spray booths all sizes -I have seen one 8 feet wide?To small huh

You are not liking our suggestions-lay off the product a few days and try a few of these ideas-I think testing is whats needed with a clear head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about spraying the bowls with another stiffer less runny glaze and the rest of the pipe with the other glaze?

They make spray booths all sizes -I have seen one 8 feet wide?To small huh

You are not liking our suggestions-lay off the product a few days and try a few of these ideas-I think testing is whats needed with a clear head.

Sorry I didn't mean to come off seeming like that, but I have to spray outside because I have no space for a booth of the larger sizes inside. I do know that I need to apply a lighter layer of glaze so I am on that same understanding. But as far as production goes I don't know how to lay off, thats why I was hoping to post and hear something I didn't think of that sounds flawless. If you know what I mean. So if nothing else thank you for giving me your input and helping out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing to keep glazes from running is less thickness-spraying is one easy way-thinning glaze is another-dipping less time is a another

different glaze -or alter yours to stiffen it as Neil says add clay to glaze-my guess is yo are using pre maid glazes

less firing temp

 

Not sure about flawless its ceramics and it will bite you sooner or later-nature of the beast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JBaymore

Change the viscosity/specific gravity of the glaze batch to give you a thinner coating per unit of time dunked.  Or.... bisque higher to make the bisque less absorbent so that it deposits glaze layer more slowly.  Or.... both.  THEN...... work on your application timing.  And know that the thicker area of the pipe will absorb more of a glaze layer in the same "dip time" than the thinner stem part.  Just how it is.  So dip the stem end into the batch first.... and then lower the bowl end into the batch.  So that the bowl is in the glaze batch the shortest time period (and hence  thinnest deposition of glaze.

 

best,

 

..................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing to keep glazes from running is less thickness-spraying is one easy way-thinning glaze is another-dipping less time is a another

different glaze -or alter yours to stiffen it as Neil says add clay to glaze-my guess is yo are using pre maid glazes

less firing temp

 

Not sure about flawless its ceramics and it will bite you sooner or later-nature of the beast

Well thank you I know I will use one of these to solve my issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change the viscosity/specific gravity of the glaze batch to give you a thinner coating per unit of time dunked.  Or.... bisque higher to make the bisque less absorbent so that it deposits glaze layer more slowly.  Or.... both.  THEN...... work on your application timing.  And know that the thicker area of the pipe will absorb more of a glaze layer in the same "dip time" than the thinner stem part.  Just how it is.  So dip the stem end into the batch first.... and then lower the bowl end into the batch.  So that the bowl is in the glaze batch the shortest time period (and hence  thinnest deposition of glaze.

 

best,

 

..................john

I don't know why I didn't think about higher bisq firing. That is a good idea and with the viscosity I think I will add a bit more water to those runny glazes. I suppose I will try some different dipping techniques as well. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Most traditional ceramic pipes I have seen are unglazed. Maybe you could wax the bowl and not glaze it. Otherwise use lighter application /less glaze around the bowl and carburetor to avoid clogging. Try a glaze with higher viscosity -less tendency to run.

It will require testing.

Marcia

The glaze still runs with wax plus waxing 100's of pipes is not what I want to do. Thanks

 

As I said before and John and Mark agreed, use a glaze that won't run so much. John's suggestion of a higher bisque is also good. Why are your glazes running so much? Too much glaze? Over firing? You need to resolve that.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi James,

 

Try dipping the pipes quickly in water prior to dipping (or you could spray/mist/spritz with water).

 

That will decrease absorption and thus reduce glaze thickness.

 

Experiment with amount of time you dip into the water (or spray), and thus how wet the piece becomes, and the amount of time between water dipping and glazing, since the thickness of both the bisque and the glaze will effect glaze absorbtion thickness. (Spraying water on vs dipping in water may keep moisture more consistant.)

 

Depending on the thickness consistancy of the piece, you may opt to only wet the thicker (if there are any) parts, or wet thicker part more thoroughly to assure more consistant wetting.

 

Experiment with how long you dip/spray. You could try simply, more quickly, dip "in and out," forgetting "how many seconds" for now...

 

Also after dipping/spraying, have a dry towel ready to quickly dry off any areas that are wetter so glaze absorbtion will be more equal. 

 

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A summary of answers to your specific question and a couple of my additions:

 

1. A thicker applied glaze layer will run more than a thinner applied glaze layer.  You already know that. 
 
2. A thin coat of glaze does not run.  You already know that.
 
3. Dipping the pipe in water before dipping or bisque firing to a higher temperature will making dipping pickup result in a thinner applied glaze.  That has already been suggested.
 
4. Changing the orientation of the pipe when dipping will change the end that has the thicker layer of glaze.  That has already been suggested.
 
5. Shaking vigorously or slinging sharply after dipping the pipe into the glaze will also remove glaze from the pipe.   My suggestion.
 
6. A quick dip of freshly glaze ware into a bucket of water will rinse some of the glaze off the ware.  Requires finesse in dipping.  Works for me most of the time, but sometimes it removes all the glaze.  A maybe suggestion.

 

7. Combinations of these are also possible.

 

LT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Most traditional ceramic pipes I have seen are unglazed. Maybe you could wax the bowl and not glaze it. Otherwise use lighter application /less glaze around the bowl and carburetor to avoid clogging. Try a glaze with higher viscosity -less tendency to run.

It will require testing.

Marcia

The glaze still runs with wax plus waxing 100's of pipes is not what I want to do. Thanks

 

As I said before and John and Mark agreed, use a glaze that won't run so much. John's suggestion of a higher bisque is also good. Why are your glazes running so much? Too much glaze? Over firing? You need to resolve that.

Marcia

 

Yes it is to much glaze and not over firing. But I will try these tips from everyone and get it right. Thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think wetting the bisque ware with a spray bottle would be a fast quick fix

Your right I used to rinse them and that was a bit extreme so I stopped. But I think that would do well. So next time I will just try my 04 bisq and spray them down. Very helpful, cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your glazes are going to be stiffer at cone 6, runnier at cone 10. If I were you I would just fire at cone 6. You'll save a lot of fuel and your glazes won't be so runny.

Well the bottom of my kiln is cone 5 and the top is cone 10. So i raise the shelves 4.5 inches off the bottom and place my first shelf where it fires cone 6. Lets just say that is how I use my kiln because I am unsure of how I can even the firing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi James,

 

Try dipping the pipes quickly in water prior to dipping (or you could spray/mist/spritz with water).

 

That will decrease absorption and thus reduce glaze thickness.

 

Experiment with amount of time you dip into the water (or spray), and thus how wet the piece becomes, and the amount of time between water dipping and glazing, since the thickness of both the bisque and the glaze will effect glaze absorbtion thickness. (Spraying water on vs dipping in water may keep moisture more consistant.)

 

Depending on the thickness consistancy of the piece, you may opt to only wet the thicker (if there are any) parts, or wet thicker part more thoroughly to assure more consistant wetting.

 

Experiment with how long you dip/spray. You could try simply, more quickly, dip "in and out," forgetting "how many seconds" for now...

 

Also after dipping/spraying, have a dry towel ready to quickly dry off any areas that are wetter so glaze absorbtion will be more equal. 

 

Good luck.

Your right I used to rinse them and that was a bit extreme so I stopped. But I think that would do well. So next time I will just try my 04 bisq and spray them down. I will also try to not count how many seconds so I can just focus on the thickness, thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A summary of answers to your specific question and a couple of my additions:

 

1. A thicker applied glaze layer will run more than a thinner applied glaze layer.  You already know that. 

 

2. A thin coat of glaze does not run.  You already know that.

 

3. Dipping the pipe in water before dipping or bisque firing to a higher temperature will making dipping pickup result in a thinner applied glaze.  That has already been suggested.

 

4. Changing the orientation of the pipe when dipping will change the end that has the thicker layer of glaze.  That has already been suggested.

 

5. Shaking vigorously or slinging sharply after dipping the pipe into the glaze will also remove glaze from the pipe.   My suggestion.

 

6. A quick dip of freshly glaze ware into a bucket of water will rinse some of the glaze off the ware.  Requires finesse in dipping.  Works for me most of the time, but sometimes it removes all the glaze.  A maybe suggestion.

 

7. Combinations of these are also possible.

 

LT

I do shake the pipes but it dries so quickly. So I am going to spray them down well enough to where they do not dry as quickly and try dipping them differently. Your advice is much appreciated. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.