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Joanie m

New Prebuilt Shed For Studio?

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One of those cheap metal sheds that you put together might work,  you wouldn't have to put cement board on the wall and you can get one for two to four hundred dollars.  Make sure you get one tall enough to stand up in and the door way is tall enough.  We bought the smallest one to put the lawn mower in and garden tools.  I am 5'8" and can't stand up in it and I am always hitting my head on the doorway when I duck to go in.   Potter

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joanie, i did exactly that here in florida.  the shed is 10x16 feet and contains everything i want except a glaze kitchen.  my situation is a little different because it is my second studio, i have a much larger one up north.

 

if you would like to see how it is set up, click on my name in this post and go to a page which offers several choices.  choose "my gallery" and look for the pictures showing the florida studio.

 

with more choices, read more $, i would have gotten one 12x16 or 12x20.  used sheds are not expensive here and are readily transported by flat bed trucks to the place you want them.

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One of my students just ordered one for a small ceramic studio on her property from Tough Shed. She first wanted to order a large building, they have a large piece of property but found out the wait with permits would be over a year, she lives in a town with very strict regulations. The largest building she could have installed in her area without permit delays was a 10 x 10 structure with a glass front so it doesn't feel so tiny at around $6000.00. If she continues to like ceramics then she will need something larger and she will use the 10 x 10 for kiln and ware. She will be putting in everything for a small studio, the building arrives end of January, I'll keep you posted on what she does and how things go if you like.

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I had a metal kiln shed built with gas and electric that cost about 3k.  The following week I picked up a 10x16' shed for glazes/mixing etc. from Craigslist, $200, grrrrr...  Definitely not as big as the kiln shed, but two would have done nicely, lol....

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Thanks everyone for your great info. Regarding size, I was thinking 12 x 15 at most. Could I use concrete pavers, the flat ones like 8x12 for under the kiln? As for water, I was going to try a combo of elevated rain barrel that I can fill with a hose and a utility sink with clay trap tub system below. Not sure if that would be too much water weight for the shed floor. I may only be able to partially fill. I was going to fix up a space in our barn, but to insulate and build walls in the space I had hoped for was going to cost big bucks. Too much for my new ie status. Art, I would enjoy hearing of the progress of your student also starting this great adventure. Pottery addiction is great!

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maybe a little more info would help.  do you already have the shed?  is the framing metal or wood?  metal, wood or plastic skin? how thick a plywood floor on what size joists or does it have a floor at all?  is the shed on skids and if so, what size and spacing.   a brand name helps since most are available in many parts of the country.  those folks also have a floor load figure so you can plan weight locations.  if it is under construction, you can add heftier joists to help with weight.

 

are you just beginning to shop for the shed?  do you plan to do any of the work yourself or are you buying a totally finished product?  how close are you to getting it?

 

did you get a look at my shed studio pictures for ideas about your sink?  my kiln is on wheels and elevated above the wood floor.  there are ways to protect a wood floor.

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Old lady, it feels funny saying that, I am thinking of a wood structure that are common here in Ohio, built by the Amish and delivered by flat bed truck. They are on skids with wood floors. I could contact the company regarding weight tolerance for the rain barrel. I have just started looking for sheds and would like to get this figured out for Spring. It would then need to be insulated,wired, and finished on the interior. I'd like to be able to use it year round so I need heat. I did look at your studio in FL. You do great work. I will be looking into the book Marcia recommended above. Thanks!

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aaaahhhhh!   well, now we have something to work with.  you can order anything you like from the amish builders, including a heavier floor and/or more skids closer together.  the cost of 2x6 versus 2x4 construction would be small in such a small space.  what fun you can have setting this up.  my favorite thing to do is design houses and build them.  sigh..........  last one was 2006.  

 

i would design it so a garden hose is sufficient to give you water if you cannot connect to a simple cold water pipe somewhere.  the outflow can be stored like mine is in a 55 gallon barrel or another arrangement to water your garden.  and you can get the electrical outlets you need where you want them.  that is really good.

 

heat and AC can be installed easily since you are ordering a complete building including well fitting doors and windows and insulation.  maybe one of those new through the wall units like dhpotter installed.  

 

if you have a Habitat for Humanity  Re-store locally,  you might find good windows and doors at a bargain price.  you have time and if you supply the windows, they can be installed during construction and save you money.  a couple of $50 windows can make a huge difference.

 

as far as the kiln goes, you might consider having it enclosed so you can occupy the rest of the studio while it is firing.  concrete pavers and a normal kiln stand should do the trick.  i used my first one inside a carpeted bedroom.  the kiln was on top of a group of concrete blocks instead of a stand.

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I have followed discussions of studios for a while. Mine is nearly complete (if that is ever possible!). Considering using 3/8 inch plywood for the wall covering due to cost savings over drywall. I love to hang things and don't want my space to be so precious that I would be afraid to hammer a nail. They would be painted a light color. Any reason to not consider plywood? Got to save a few dollars to afford the pugger!

Thanks in advance!

Penny

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Joanie!,

Congratulations on taking the plunge. I purchased a prebuilt wooden building some years ago with the intent of moving my pottery making there. I took the valuable information provided by members of this forum when I finally was ready to do the wiring! Lots of receptacles, more than you think you will ever need and as large a breaker box as you can get! I did build a metal shed off one side for my kiln. Heavy plastic under gravel with concrete pavers to set the kiln on. I sacrificed wall space for a door from the studio to the shed. Mine is a dry studio with the bucket system.

Good luck!

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penny, my walls are of the oriented strandboard that is commonly called plywood.  yes, nails go into it very well to hang up everything.  i use drywall for shelves, one drywall shelf holds lots of pots and since my work is flat, it dries flat.

 

i've never noticed that one costs significantly more than the other, just never considered using drywall on the walls.

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I would not use sheet rock -use strand board or plywood to cover insulation. That way you can screw or nail to it (I like screws) as they can change locations easy.

My throwing room in studio is covered with 1/8 inch thick mahogany material like door skins are made from. Its caulked at the seem and painted -I also covered the room in thick plastic-taped the seems culled the edges first before wood covered that. No breeze or air movement thru that.

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Guest JBaymore

I would not use sheet rock -use strand board or plywood to cover insulation.

 

Building Code here where I live would not allow that.  5/8" drywall for fire rating over insulation and wood studs.

 

best,

 

..................john

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I would not use sheet rock -use strand board or plywood to cover insulation.

 

Building Code here where I live would not allow that. 5/8" drywall for fire rating over insulation and wood studs.

 

best,

..................john

might depend if the fire rating was required in the first place, I don't know your area but many detached structures fall under different requirements depending on where and what size.

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Out buildings of small size in our area do not fall under the same restrictions as living space in homes. I would check for your area on this as well as for whatever size your are thinking. Keeping it unattached as well will change its fire rating sometimes.

 

If its attached to living structure I would have suggested sheetrock but I think its a small shed in yard. NH has some tough laws to require that everywhere.

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Mark, I agree... in Calif. where everything is quickly becoming over regulated seems to me most of the time unattached structures fall under much less restrictive building codes and when you don't need any permits I think you can do pretty much what you want as long as it doesn't change the occupancy classification. I'd have to reread but I thought the building she was talking about delivered by the Amish fell under those rules of not requiring permits.

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Guest JBaymore

Here in my town..... just about EVERYTHING needs a Building Permit.  And if it is a "people work in it" space....... codes apply.  A "wood shed" type structure if it was less than a total of 100 square feet dimension would not need a permit. 

 

When I moved here....... 40 years ago......... you could do just about anything yourself (excavation, foundations, electrical, plumbing, additions, alterations, etc.) and unless you were building a new house.... you  didn't need a permit.

 

Too much regulation!!!!!!!!  We are now living in the "WARNING: hot coffee is hot" world.  It is nuts.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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true that different areas have very different ideas of what is "safe" or "necessary".   have worked in a number of states and cities and find that the "universal" building code book is not.

 

if the building is 100 square feet or less, the rules do not apply.  unless you want it closer to the property line than the rules allow, then they might.  

 

you would think building code developers are potters, everything is possible but "it depends."

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