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#1 Lucy POTTERY

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 04:44 AM

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Hi to everyone. Please check my YT channel and let me know:-) https://www.youtube....ITzcuqsUJaaP-mw



#2 Sputty

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 04:52 AM

Your use of broken glass has just reminded me of film I saw of potters in Iran, who grind glass up to a powder, mix it to a slurry with water, and use it as a glaze.

If you've got 30 minutes, it's an absorbing film:

 

BBC - Handmade on the Silk Road: The Potter

 

(How do I embed videos here, rather than just link to them? Other people seem to have managed it...)



#3 Chilly

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 07:09 AM

Be warned that clay and glass have different rates of expansion and contraction and they are simply not made to be put together.

 

This forum is full of questions about glaze fit, and the problems associated with it.  That's with using two products designed to be together.

 

At some time in the future the glass will disassociate itself from the clay, usually explosively.  You will not want to be in the same room when it does so.


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#4 RonSa

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:29 AM

 

Sputty, Like This

[media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aucqjnDl68M[/media]

Take notice of the media tags before and after the complete url the

 

 

Also

 

In the reply box you'll see this icon ips_bbcode.png?t=4b93cd7f1f76df9c2c1783a click on it and in the BBCode drop down box choose media then follow the prompts


Ron


#5 Stephen

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 09:30 AM

Chilly is right, I checked with the main art glass producer (at least was, Spectrum folded this year) and they flatly say it shouldn't be done. Even if it appears to work it won't and the piece will fail eventually. It causes safety issues because that failure is likely going to happen when someone is handling the piece. They have tried to get the word out to people who list instructions on technique but it still persist.

 

The two mediums are not compatible.

 

Its a shame though, beautiful work!



#6 Benzine

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 11:13 AM

That BBC video was excellent, thanks for posting it!

 

They sure got that glass to look a whole lot like traditional glaze.  I like the addition of the tree sap.  It seems like their equivalent of liquid gum.


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#7 Sputty

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 11:25 AM

Sputty, Like This

[media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aucqjnDl68M[/media]

Take notice of the media tags before and after the complete url the

 

 

Also

 

In the reply box you'll see this icon ips_bbcode.png?t=4b93cd7f1f76df9c2c1783a click on it and in the BBCode drop down box choose media then follow the prompts

 

That's great - thanks for the how-to! Much better!



#8 preeta

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:05 PM

what about jugtown? they have put pieces of glass on their handles on their large crocs. 

 

here is mark hewitt showing how he uses glass on his pottery. i've noticed some of them are functional ware too. on tumblers. however he uses glass for decoration, not as a glass to cover the whole pot. 

 


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#9 bciskepottery

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:44 PM

Glass can work for decoration.  But for functional work -- on insides -- not a good idea unless your glass and the glaze share the same COE.  Otherwise, they are going to heat differently, expand and contract differently, and cool differently -- every time the bowl or mug goes into a microwave or oven.  Eventually the bonds will loosen and craze, crack, shiver, etc. whether the piece if functional or non-functional. 

 

If you look at the finished piece in her gallery, you can still see outlines of some of the pieces of broken glass used . . . not completely melted. 

 

Makers need to understand how their materials interact and the limits of their materials. 



#10 RonSa

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:50 PM

Your use of broken glass has just reminded me of film I saw of potters in Iran, who grind glass up to a powder, mix it to a slurry with water, and use it as a glaze.

If you've got 30 minutes, it's an absorbing film:

 

He also added tree sap and said without it the glaze would not last long (21:30) . I'm guessing he means before firing and not after?


Ron


#11 Sputty

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 02:11 PM

 


 

He also added tree sap and said without it the glaze would not last long (21:30) . I'm guessing he means before firing and not after?

 

 

I assume it added raw adherence - and perhaps toughened the (unfired) glaze to minimise any handling damage - before firing. Any tree sap will burn out way before maturation temperature, and presumably add little or nothing to the chemistry of the glaze.

It's also worth bearing in mind that the translation to English subtitles hasn't been done by someone with technical knowledge of pottery, so it may be that nuances have been lost.

What I love about this film is the utter lack of artifice or pretentiousness of pots or potters. It is depressing that the world is moving on and away from these people and their roles.



#12 MatthewV

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:12 PM

You could view "glass" as a fritted glaze ingredient. It has silica, potassium, sodium, and some colorants. It is low in alumina and I would guess there is no boron. 


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#13 oldlady

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 06:19 PM

i have seen what happens when the glass in the bottom of a plate finally separated.  a piece disappeared.  

 

the question is where did it go?  someone's tummy, the dishwasher, the food on the plate?  

 

the missing piece was tiny but sharp.


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