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Pugaboo

Pricing Private And Semi Private Lesssons

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Pugaboo    438

Okay you all know I was thinking, now that I have insurance, about starting to offer limited private lessons in my own studio. I have taught at the local art center a few times and have found I really enjoy teaching, seeing that light go on in their eyes when they get something is very satisfying. Well anyhow I was still in the thinking stage while working in the studio today when I had one show up on my doorstep. Literally... I looked up and there she was.

 

I had spoken with her a few times before about some of her projects that she was really struggling with where she currently is and gave her some pointers and such. I told her she could call me and I would help her with the latest as well. When I spoke with her I hadn't really thought about formally teaching but she told me today that she and a friend want to come take semi private lessons with me, just the 2 of them together.

 

They both know the basics of clay but have moved beyond beginner and are branching out in to design work and such. Design work and hand building is what we would focus on as well as tackling some of the forms like mugs that she really wants to learn how to do.

 

My question for those of you out there teaching private and semi private lessons... what kind of pricing structure should I use?

 

I would provide the space, tools, equipment, specialty materials for design work, and knowledge. I am trying to decide if I should include the price of clay in with the lesson, sell that to them separately, or have them buy and bring their own. Then I also have to tackle the issue of firing costs and such.

 

I would offer once a week classes, open ended... meaning they can take as few or as many as they want. When they get tired of me they can simply stop the lessons. There would be a minimum 2 hour class period to sign up for and I would prefer to offer a standard 3 hour weekly class. Would it be better to offer a set number of classes for a set number of hours each week? I would offer no open studio time only class time.

 

They are really REALLY interested and want to start next week so kind of need some input from you guys!

 

T

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MatthewV    258

I dunno. There are many factors.

 

I charge $280 for an 8-week class that includes everything (including studio access). I can take 8 wheel or 12 hand building students

I did $110 for a 4-week youth class that included materials and such.

I don't do paid private lessons.

 

I generally feel that the materials are cheap so I include them in beginning classes.

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neilestrick    1,381

Here's how I do it:

 

1. I get $75 per hour for my time, whether it's kiln repair or workshops or whatever. So if someone wants a private lesson, that's what it costs. Nobody wants to pay that much so I don't ever do private lessons. I'm fine with that. I'd rather do my other work anyway.

 

2. You should not do open ended classes. You need to lock people in for a specific amount of time (8 weeks), otherwise you end up as a storage space for their crap. They'll come one week, then come back 3 weeks later and you have to store their work. Plus there won't be any continuity to the class. You can't teach a class of beginners if they aren't all there every week. Also, you can't do a budget if it's open ended because you'll have no idea what your income will be week to week.

 

3. I don't include materials in the tuition cost. Some students will use a lot of clay, others not so much. Students need to learn the value of the materials. They should buy the clay from you. It's another small income stream for you, and it's the only way to make sure they're not putting something bad in your kiln. I include the firing and glazing costs in the price of the clay. It's way easier for everyone that way.

 

4. I charge $215 for 8 weeks, student buy their own tools and clay. Kids classes are $85 for 4 weeks, clay included (kids don't use much clay at all).

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Mark C.    1,805

Neil said (You need to lock people in)

The cops will find out about this sooner or later dude about you doing this..

T if you lock them up it will cause problems

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I do private lessons 1-3 people for 1.5hours $60.  5 weeks is a good mini and it includes the first 25lb bag of clay. I find that I can schedule several of these a week and instead of draining my energy I really like the interaction with adult learners. I've made life long friends and have one lady who's been coming to me for 5 years. The 1-3 people makes it nice for them to buddy up or bring a friend, or choose to have the lesson all to their selves. 

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glazenerd    816

Not going to comment on pricing, but rather legalities.

 

You already know about " liability" , but working out of your homes creates " severability" issues. Giving lessons on someone else's property creates " severability" from broader scopes of liability. Working from your house removes severability and puts more of your personal assets at risk. Severability laws vary from state to state: need to check them before proceeding.

Nerd

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bciskepottery    925

Make sure there is no conflict of interest between your new community studio job and your taking on personal students.

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Pugaboo    438

I told them before I accepted the position that I was teaching private students. They had no issue with it. My private lessons are also more expensive than their group lessons when divided down to 6, 3 hour sessions. Some of the pottery studio members do take lessons from me wanting to get personal one on one instruction on particular projects or techniques.

 

Private and group lessons have completely different dynamics you either like one or need the other.

 

T

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Judith B    52

I live in Japan so I guess it might be different but thought I was going to throw my 2 cents in there.

 

Here a 2 hours lesson is about 30 dollars and that includes the basic materials (reclaimed clay, tools and receiving teaching). To use new clay, one has to pay extra. Then there is a firing cost depending on the size of the object. This lesson if taken only 1 times includes the teacher doing basic trimming and glazing for you.

Then, the hand building set of 6 lessons is around 150 dollars

There is also a small fee per hour to use the electric wheel.

 

Then there is a monthly fee for unlimited use that does not include clay (except if you use reclaimed clay) and firing costs.

 

All of these lessons are semi-private, the teacher goes from a student to another and answers any questions you might have but everyone is working on something different so it is tailored to you in a way

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