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Evelyne Schoenmann

Qotw: Are There Redundant Things In Your Studio?

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The moving marathon our friend Marcia is just living through gave me the idea to this weeks question . I followed her messages here and on fb what exactly she was getting rid of before moving to Montana. And then I went down to my studio and thought: hmmmm.... if I had to move my studio tomorrow, what would I throw away?... what would I give away?... what would I take with me? My studio is cluttered with lots of things I don't really need (remember our diving-into-the-waste-bins QOTW?!), but would I get rid of them just because of moving the studio? I admire you Marcia!!

 

Come on people, go to your studio, have a good look around and tell us what, say 3-5 things you would dispense with when moving.

 

It's just for fun, don't worry,  don't panic, you can keep everything you like! :D

 

Hugs!

 

Evelyne

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I am still in the stages of setting up, and I clean out clutter pretty ruthlessly, so the only thing I can think of that would go is some containers of stamps I made that I've kept but never ever use. In fact, I've been thinking of offering them to the potters here if people pay for shipping.

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I'm in the midst of a big cleanout / rearrangement of my studio right now.  It currently looks like a bomb went off.  (And I'm also producing work for a firing.... bad combo.)

 

Changes in the direction for the future is part of it.  Getting older is dictating part of it too.  Settling in for the "next chapter".

 

Lots of the "might be good someday" is heading out the door ;).   Someday just seemed to not arrive yet.  I can't wait.

 

Another example:  I used to run a summer woodfiring workshop here at my studio every year.  Did that for a LONG time.  Then slowly I was spending just about every summer in Japan... and had to cancel doing those.   (Once I ran one of those here a few days after I returned from 2 months in Japan...... BIG mistake.)  Now I know that I'll not do the workshops here anymore.  So two Randal kickwheels, one Brent kickwheel, and one Lockerbie kickwheel are headed out the door.

 

Heavier wareboards that are still good.... but are heavier wood than what I now use (light, thin birch plywood).... away they go. 

 

And so on.

 

best,

 

................john

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A couple of formica slabs with wire frames for small sculpture, magazines, 5 gal buckets and a small satellite dish that I was going to use as a hump mold someday.  These have accumulated since I moved my studio ten years ago.  Denice

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Funny you should ask. I dumped most of my hump molds because I slump slabs in air from sandwiched rims..much lighter to move.Got rid of garbage barges full of decayed plastic containers. I think the heat has destroyed them anyway. CLeaning has been a good thing. Oh yes, the magazines went to good homes. many books went to the library or got sold earlier. Have to leave the propane tanks but they are pretty much empty. And yes, the might be good some days are gone. ONly tried and true left.

Marcia

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I guess the female sweater form that hangs on the wall is a redundant item. . . I had thought that it might make a great hump mold, but have never decided to use it. It does make an interesting statement hanging on the wall though, just can't figure out what that is. . . anymore.

 

 

best,

Pres

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Evelyne:

 

This weeks question, Marcia moving; and the responses I am seeing gives me an idea for a QoTW:

 

What are the top five things in your studio that you would not part with, if you had to downsize?

 

Personally, I have spent the last 3-4 months cataloging, taking pictures of; and organizing the notes from seven years of testing clay and glazes. I have thrown out the equivalent of a 55 gallon drum of 5" round test tiles. probably close to 500-600 lbs worth. Sorta like walking down memory lane in a way. I saved a few: the ones that made lights go off, connected dots of information, or gave the answers I was looking for. Yes, I saved "baby blue."

 

Nerd

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I tend to clean out sections every 5-8 years in rotation . The job is more manageable . I just did the hardest wall last winter.Papers recipes and tests.

I have some under table clay that has been there for 30 years-thinks its hard yet??

My next move will be into an urn.

If I ever move I'll be done with clay.43 years in same studio

Mark

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I am in a fancy hotel in LA near the Staples Center, everything lit up and decked out for Christmas, in an area already filled to overflow with neon, and buy-buy-buy ads on jumbotrons fastened to the outsides of buildings--this place is nuts.  I'm here for a training in data collection and pretty much hating every minute. I suspect I may not end up doing the job that is attached to the training. It's been hard on the bod, the mind, the mood, and the home-body in me who is missing her studio. With the studio and the art being the driving force of my very existence these days, I have to say there is not one single thing I would or could leave behind if I had to move. NOT ONE THING, and I can't wait to get back to it! 

Babs, flowerdry and Chilly like this

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I work in a 12'x12' space, so real estate is a bit dear and I don't have space for any epic hoarding efforts. I have some styrofoam slump moulds that probably need to go because every time I open the glaze materials closet, they fall on my head. There's an ugly-ass pair of green coveralls on that top shelf that should go, too. I have some much nicer stripey ones, plus a bunch of aprons. And if I were moving, I'd get rid of any broken plastic, any and all newspaper, and I'd do a test tile edit as well.

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I have some under table clay that has been there for 30 years-thinks its hard yet??

My next move will be into an urn.

If I ever move I'll be done with clay.43 years in same studio

 

I have some of that "under table clay" also..... and probably at the 30 year level also.  ;)  Really plastic and not able to make anymore due to raw materials sources being gone (my kingdom for Pine Lake Fireclay and PBX fireclay).  Some I take out every now and then to use.

 

Been in the same studio ....at 39 years here.

 

I can't conceive of moving my studio at this point.  If it has to happen due to age/health...... likely I'll be done with clay also, Mark.  At the moment my wife and I are getting the house and studio ready for the "age in place" phrase that is the current politically way of saying...... becoming OLD and staying put.

 

best,

 

................john

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John I can relate to that age in place-I did the 50 year roof (never doing that again) 25 year exterior paint(never doing that again)  a few years ago

Next are the shower grab bars . I'm not yet middle 60s but am thinking ahead.

 

As to reduntant studio things I have 5 power wheels-but only use 4 so one is really extra .

I also have more glaze materials than I will ever use in my life

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 I can relate to that age in place-I did the 50 year roof (never doing that again) 25 year exterior paint(never doing that again)  a few years ago

Next are the shower grab bars . I'm not yet middle 60s but am thinking ahead.

 

Those shower grab bars and bathroom remodel went in about 7 years ago now.  New furnace about 5 years ago. New kitchen JUST went in and finished 3 weeks ago (needed it... last done in 1977).  Cedar clapboard siding is in process (contractors are here today).  New 50 year roof next year.

 

I'm 67 1/2......... time flies when you are having fun.

 

best,

 

.............john

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I'm having my garden re-modelled, so I can reach to the middle of all the veg beds and those I usually replant each year.  Going from 300mm high raised brick beds to the whole area paved and going to buy 900mm square/octagonal plastic wood planters that are 600mm high.  Planning for a less bendy back as I pass 60 next spring.

 

As for throwing out, last lot of tidying filled two sacks with: plastic containers and lids that didn't match, wrinkled newspapers, and assorted items that might make good formers/hump/slump moulds.  My "studio" is half of a 10' by 8' greenhouse, so there is not much spare space for junk.

Marcia Selsor likes this

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Redundancy? What is redundant can change depending on the day of the week for me. Since I got the pugmill and had to move everything in the studio around to fit it in I have found that having filing cabinets in the studio redundant. Now I DO need the stuff in the cabinets but have decided I can put them in the room next door instead. I just have to go through THAT room and get rid of some stuff THERE so they will fit between the 2 shelf units.

 

I got rid of my stereo and before you all melt down over that I have all my music on my computer and also have Amazon Music so I can play pretty much anything on want with that or in my phone instead. I currently have 3 printers in there and am trying to decide if one of them is redundant or not, the jury is still out on that. I have flat files and a huge light box table left over from my graphic artist days but even though I am not using the table currently it is too nice and too BIG to do anything else with. I have taken over a few drawers in the flat file for stencils, silkscreens, drawings and such which I use for clay but most of the drawers are full of art papers and finished artwork.

 

I wish I had more room than I do but I will figure out what to edit and give away or put in storage for a future time. The pugmill has caused a serious case of the but-fers. Meaning I could do this BUT FOR that or I could move this BUT FOR This. I will solve the problem just need some time to put the new puzzle of my studio together in my head.

 

T

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If I had to move.....hmmmmm.......my old Evenheat kiln, tools I have had for years and never used, dried up commercial glazes people have given to me that are in firing ranges I have no interest in, broken shelf pieces I will never use, and some old warped bats.

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I love all these focuses . making home for growing old in is exactly why we're moving to this place. We really aren't happy in current location and have missed life in Montana where we want to grow old. mellow friendly pace of life there. THe house is much lower maintenance that the old one we had in Billings. THe one in Texas is way too big but nice surrounding except for the heat and bugs that eat everything in my garden and on trees. planning a manageable greenhouse is the North. as for what I won't leave behind: good work tables on wheels, slab roller, pugmill, clay mixer, paper pulp mixer, still have ball mill but..it may go. Wheels, perfect height for me wedging table, chemical storage shelves for container, ware arts on wheels, on wheels that doubles for a crate for my grandmother's crystal cabinet ,

I am really hoping to roll everything onto the container. Got rid of 50% of my books. some of the chemicals can stay until spring. THe mirror is coming. Propane torch bottles staying. Not allowed on the container. This will be the last time for studio move. I am thankful it is in a place we both love. The plan is to move the studio and some of the household and get the old house ready to sell by next summer.

Marcia

Marcia

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Marcia,

 

I can't imagine completely moving at this point in our lives even if I did not have the studio.  The household and stuff is daunting enough.  Bravo to you for undertaking such an endeavor.

 

I could not imagine moving to another property even in the same town in which I live!

 

I actually have the option of moving to Japan should I want to (piece of land with studio and wood kiln access available to me there from a very generous and dear friend).  As a potter...... the "fantasy" come true.  But what a project to actually move.  And internationally to boot.  And such a move would not be good for my wife....... who is not "connected" to the Japanese people like I am and does not speak Japanese at all.  Then there is the idea of leaving the family (kids and grandkids).  Were we rich and could fly them over for visits and fly back to the US on a whim...... that would make it easier... but still not good.   And then there is also living the expatriate life.  I don't ever see it happening.  Still visit, yes....... moving there, no.

 

Still working on the studio.  Working on a lot of what I now know are "But-fers".  (Thanks!)

 

best,

 

................john

 

PS:  Current "but-fer" is that to get the kickwheel that I plan to sell OUT of the place it is in now, I have to move a HEAVY large 4' x 8' work table.  And to move that table, I have to move all the heavy stuff that is stored UNDER that table.  But-fer that, getting the wheel moved so I can put something ELSE there where the wheel was would be pretty easy.

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I think my most redundant thing is old clay that I never plan on using. If that counts. I have so many bags of random clay that isn't labeled, but I know is cone 6. Maybe one day I will just make a ton of random stuff out of those clays. But I doubt it. I will probably toss it out one day when I actually need the space. 

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Gunnas and Butfers

Well I'm gunna clean my shed ; the butfers are stopping this.

I have the odd day when I almost could but then I have this glorious thought, the kids can do this, hell I "would've"  another uselful word, cleaned up but fer them.

It is on my bucket list, the only thing there....

I do have a lot of buckets of clay under my table, I live on a sandy plain so I can contribute to the wettablility in my own small way.

Lots of stuff collected for texture need to be reinstated in the landscape.

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Marcia,

John,

It is daunting but a necessity at this time. The move to Texas was to benefit Matt's career. IT has, but we never intended to live here forever. So it is now or never. downsizing is a good thing. Matt is an Army brat so he knows how to live with minimum baggage. I rarely moved during my life. BUt after attending my. 50th HS reunion this year, I am keeping my yearbook. I did get rid of more than 50% of my books with a lot going to the local. Library fundraiser. Downsized redundant stuff in the studio. good thing. LOads to the land fill included old artwork from 20 years ago, plaster molds, sheetrock slab boards, things never used including all those potentially cool things.

I think I have it organized to begin loading on Monday. CUrrently in Germany with Matt and meeting a potter friend today. BE back on Sunday to load on Monday.

And then. Smaller house, bigger studio, and. Greenhouse gardening.

Looking forward to baking again, making warm stick to your ribs soups, stews, etc.

Pot lucks with friends.

Marcia

 

 

I can't imagine completely moving at this point in our lives even if I did not have the studio. The household and stuff is daunting enough. Bravo to you for undertaking such an endeavor.

 

I could not imagine moving to another property even in the same town in which I live!

 

I actually have the option of moving to Japan should I want to (piece of land with studio and wood kiln access available to me there from a very generous and dear friend). As a potter...... the "fantasy" come true. But what a project to actually move. And internationally to boot. And such a move would not be good for my wife....... who is not "connected" to the Japanese people like I am and does not speak Japanese at all. Then there is the idea of leaving the family (kids and grandkids). Were we rich and could fly them over for visits and fly back to the US on a whim...... that would make it easier... but still not good. And then there is also living the expatriate life. I don't ever see it happening. Still visit, yes....... moving there, no.

 

Still working on the studio. Working on a lot of what I now know are "But-fers". (Thanks!)

 

best,

 

................john

 

PS: Current "but-fer" is that to get the kickwheel that I plan to sell OUT of the place it is in now, I have to move a HEAVY large 4' x 8' work table. And to move that table, I have to move all the heavy stuff that is stored UNDER that table. But-fer that, getting the wheel moved so I can put something ELSE there where the wheel was would be pretty easy.

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