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How Is This Look Achieved?

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I am a fairly new potter and I love this look. Can someone give me a primer on how the look it achieved? Specifically the leaf/glaze look (the plate I can handle on my own :D).

 

Thanks

 

K

 

 

post-61544-0-90037000-1480955401_thumb.jpg

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My quick guess: leaf impressed into greenware, light green slip brushed lightly on unmasked areas at leatherhard, brown/red slip on sides and back, remove leaf or fire it in bisque, light copper wash at bisque on leaf/wiped back to only remain in veins, dipped in clear, glaze fired. Edit: looks like a buff clay, such as Standard 225

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I have a glaze that will bring out the details of leaf veins from a leaf that is gently rolled into soft clay. After pressing the leaf, It would be possible to wash the outside. The leaf is then used as a texture and as the mask if more contrast is desired.

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That is more complicated than it seems at first. Most potters will roll a leaf into the surface and work from there, but that leaf is actually raised above the surface of the plate ... which would be tricky.

I have never done this but if I was going to try ... first I would soak a real leaf in a bleach solution until all the green was gone and only the skeleton was left. I would lay that out on wax paper and somehow gently coat it with slip and let it firm up a bit. Then I would transfer the leaf to a soft slab and shape the plates.

Any other ideas about how to get a raised leaf impression??

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Try this 'idea' for a raised leaf impression:

 

  1. Take soak your leaf thoroughly in water so that the leaf is pliable.
     
  2. Impress the leaf into the clay and shape the bowl with the leaf attached to the clay. 
     
  3. Take a soft sponge and spray bottle and slightly wet the clay surfaces beyond the leaf to create a thin layer of slip. Use the sponge to wipe away the slip.
     
  4. Allow the shine on the clay to go away, then repeat the spray and wipe steps until you like the amount of relief for the leaf.
     
  5. Put the pot aside to dry.  Remove the leaf carefully or just burn it out in the bisque.

I have used the procedure on thrown vertical cylinders.

 

BTW: Coating the side of leaf next to the clay with mars black acrylic paint before impressing it into the clay will produce an iron red stained area after the bisque firing (mars black pigment is iron oxide).

 

LT

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I actually think that plaster was poured over a leaf that was laid over a master to create a hump mould for the whole plate. Then it's easy to fill the leaf pattern with coloured slip or an oxide wash when you go to make lots of those plates, and it creates a raised leaf.

In fact, I think the master may have been a styrofoam or plastic disposable plate.

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i am waiting for our local specialist in leaf prints - oldlady - to give you her exact method. if you look for her under members and then look at her gallery you can see the leaf plates she has. 

 

but if i remember right its how callie described it. i remember oldlady created a hump mold. i can see why callie is talking about a disposable plate. 

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